Reddit

Subscribe to Reddit feed
All things Linux and GNU/Linux -- this is neither a community exclusively about the kernel Linux, nor is exclusively about the GNU operating system.Linux, GNU/Linux, free software...
Updated: 15 min 30 sec ago

Linux 4.16-rc2 released

Mon, 2018-02-19 04:43

Let's stop telling people that GPU Passthrough is hard, okay? It's not that difficult.

Mon, 2018-02-19 02:05

I keep seeing comment after comment on posts where someone mentions GPU passthrough, and a few replies about how it's "hard".

GPU PASSTHROUGH IS NOT HARD, and I will show you.

You'll need:

  • Proper Hardware. Most modern CPU's and Mobos are capable of passing through a GPU or other PCI device. I run on an AMD FX-8350 mounted on an ASRock 970 Extreme 4 with 16GB of RAM. There is an nVidia GT 730 attached to the host, and an AMD R7 240 to the VM. I've also passed through a USB controller, because Spice USB redirection and gaming don't mix well (odd input errors, causing me to die in games often.)

  • The fine free softwares QEMU & libvirt. On Ubuntu, use "apt install qemu-kvm libvirt-bin virt-manager spice-client" to install these packages. I don't know what the package names are for other distros. VNC software for Windows administration is recommended, unless you're snazzy and have two monitors or something. I use a TV with two HDMI inputs, switching between one or the other.

  • The virtio guest drivers. You can find them here.

  • (optional) an extra HDD or SSD for your Windows partition, to minimize disk writes, improving performance. QEMU uses a COW type disk image. Why write twice if we don't have to?

  • (optional, but highly recommended) a separate KB/M for your VM, or whatever input device you prefer. I use my Steam Controller. Works great.

Got all that? Good.

Now, the "hard part". In /etc/default/grub, add "amd_iommu=on" (or intel_iommu=on, IIRC) to your kernel line. Reboot. That didn't seem very hard, now was it?

Back to the easy stuff.

Using Virt-Manager, create a new VM. This is very straightforward, and will be minimally covered here. If you're using a separate disk for your VM (if you can, do it!), make sure to choose the Custom Storage option when creating your VM. Choose a SATA disk bus.

The default networking option is sufficient for most use cases. Choose virtio for better performance.

Be sure to add a second SATA CD-ROM device for the virtio guest drivers in addition to the one for your Windows install image.

Now, install Windows (or whatever OS) in your VM. Don't forget to load the virtio drivers, or your networking/virtio storage devices may not work.

Shut down the VM after installation, and add your GPU using the Add Hardware -> PCI Host device option.. If you're using HDMI audio, don't forget to add it, too. Adding the USB controller at this time is also recommended. If your GPU has drivers, either download them from within the VM, or use dd to create an iso of your driver disc, and add it to the storage pool.

Install the drivers for your GPU (and any other passed through device, if need be), reboot your VM, and enjoy!

Refer to /r/vfio or Alex Williamson's blog for additional info.

submitted by /u/Songandsilence3
[link] [comments]

Someone should make a site for linux noobs like myself to angrily vent

Mon, 2018-02-19 01:37

I don't know if it's just me, but it seems like Linux is some sort of metaphor for the real world. It does everything you wanted, that windows never could, but you have to work HARD to figure out how to get it. Windows is more like having rich parents who spoil you, but are very strict. Everything works right out of the box, but it's somewhat limited what you can do.

With linux, and my experience so far, it feels like I need to get a PhD in Bash to fix issues that should be self explanatory in Windows. Maybe it's just me, but I doubt I'm the only one who feels like this.

It would be nice if they made a site where I could just rant without having to worry about my tone, or any sort of rules, but since it's Reddit, I'm trying not to act as angry as I actually am.

Is this a dumb idea? Does it already exist?

submitted by /u/LittleMrsAme
[link] [comments]

Chomper - An Internet Blocker for Linux

Mon, 2018-02-19 01:33

Chomper is an internet blocker for helping prevent procrastination/mindless web surfing. It's in the same vein as Cold Turkey or SelfControl. However, neither of these programs support Linux, and the only similar program hasn't been developed in over 7 years. So, I developed Chomper.

Chomper has a simple command-line interface through which you can implement blacklists and whitelists at the URL level (e.g. you can block amazon.com/gp/video/*, but not amazon.com). You can see a demo of its use in a gif at the Github repo. I've been using it successfully for the last week, and I finished polishing it off so that it's fit for general use. It's GPL-licensed. Please try it out, and let me know how you like it!

submitted by /u/MiltonWatterson
[link] [comments]

Deja Dup is not as trustworthy as it seems

Mon, 2018-02-19 01:24

I have 2 drives, one 2tb hdd and one 240gb ssd. I went to backup the SSD before I installed a new OS on it, waited for it to complete, and then installed the new OS. After entering Deja Dup on the new OS, I went to restore the backup... But it was missing. I told deja Dup to backup on the 2tb drive, but it ignored my instructions and instead backed up to the home folder, which is now, might I remind you, formatted.

submitted by /u/InhumanThree1
[link] [comments]

When was the last time you actually had to boot an older kernel, from within the same version?

Mon, 2018-02-19 00:52

On Debian and Ubuntu at least, they save every kernel revision that ever gets installed, for even minor revisions (like 4.9.12 4.9.13, etc). This uses lots of space, and needs to be cleaned manually still, especially if you have a separate /boot...
When was the last time one of you actually had to use an older kernel version after a minor update? I always felt like they should only preserve major releases, like the latest 4.9, the latest 4.10, but maybe I am wrong...

submitted by /u/n3rdopolis
[link] [comments]

Should I relent, and let my son have Windows?

Sun, 2018-02-18 21:46

We are a Linux house because of my long held views on it being better than Windows in so many ways. I try to pass on my floss beliefs to my children, so they also use Linux on their laptops. We have no Windows devices on the network.

But...my son watches the YouTubers playing games only available on Windows. He has Steam for Linux, but the games he wants aren't available.

I get it, but I've learned to accept this and if devs don't support my choice of os then they don't get my money.

But he doesn't see it that way and just wants the games. I see it as a massive potential compromise on the network, and a pain for me to maintain securely. Not to mention it being negative in the freedom dimension. Right?

So, as per the title, should I let him have Windows? And what is the safest way to isolate his machine from the network?

submitted by /u/fluxusfinesmith
[link] [comments]

This is why using command line is actually easy

Sun, 2018-02-18 21:29

You just type some simple names of premade programs. The programs do all the hard work.

That is what you can say to anyone who is worried that the command line is hard to use.

submitted by /u/jones_supa
[link] [comments]

UBports soliciting help with Unity 8 desktop development

Sun, 2018-02-18 21:06

From Ubuntu Touch Q&A 23:

Unity 8 Desktop

Unity 8 on the desktop has also been coming together. While it's both good and pretty, it's not 'pretty good'.

Work still needs to be done to get Unity 8 working properly on Nvidia GPUs. However, a Developer ISO will be coming out soon, so if you're interested in testing Unity 8, then get excited!

If you are a developer and already know a bit about Unity 8 development, help is appreciated, so go ping @mariogrip!

submitted by /u/GizmoChicken
[link] [comments]

Fixing the default calibration for an evdev device on the kernel?

Sun, 2018-02-18 20:35

So I was having problems using a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller on my Linux desktop and also on Android devices because of how the default calibration for the analog sticks is mapped. Basically it won't register the full range of input going up or right for both analog sticks.

I could fix this by using "evdev-joystick" and adjusting the calibration values.

(Described in detail here with solutions I found: https://joaorb64.github.io/2018/02/14/Configuring-a-Nintendo-Switch-Pro-Controller-on-Linux.html)

Now, is this something kernel patch-able or something like that? What can be done to facilitate the use of this device on Linux?

submitted by /u/joaorbezerra
[link] [comments]

UBports soliciting help with Unity 8 desktop development

Sun, 2018-02-18 20:34

From Ubuntu Touch Q&A 23:

Unity 8 Desktop

Unity 8 on the desktop has also been coming together. While it's both good and pretty, it's not 'pretty good'.

Work still needs to be done to get Unity 8 working properly on Nvidia GPUs. However, a Developer ISO will be coming out soon, so if you're interested in testing Unity 8, then get excited!

If you are a developer and already know a bit about Unity 8 development, help is appreciated, so go ping @mariogrip!

submitted by /u/GizmoChicken
[link] [comments]

Pages