TuxMachines

Subscribe to TuxMachines feed
Your source for Linux and Open Source news, reviews, and howtos.
Updated: 39 min 56 sec ago

OSS Leftovers

Thu, 2017-11-16 23:13
  • From consumers to contributors: The evolution of open source in the enterprise

    The use of open source software is commonplace in enterprises, but many organisations are still reluctant to contribute their own code, despite the benefits it can bring

  • The value of open source software

    A renaissance is happening with open source software. IT managers are constantly searching for new ways to harness the power of open code, especially as more companies move to the cloud.

    [...]

    Anyone can freely use, change, and share open source software in modified or unmodified form. While companies working in commercial open source add value by turning what may appear as raw material to other enterprises into whole products. Embracing an open source mindset is an invitation for innovation, and enables organisations to break free from proprietary vendors.

  • Nuls—the Global Open Source Platform for Blockchain-Based Applications to Be Adopted in Business Scenarios
  • Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

    “26,000 new blockchain projects last year!” screamed the headline. “But only 8 percent remain active!” The implication is that blockchain’s future is at risk, given the high mortality rate among its offspring. Yet nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, we need many more blockchain projects to fail to clear out some of the noise, leaving room for “Linux of blockchain”-type projects to remain.

    And yet there is cause for concern, though not in blockchain specifically. Instead, the greater concern should be for open source, which has never been more popular with software users even as the developer population feeding it has remained flat. Unless we can find ways to encourage more contributions, open source efforts like blockchain threaten to crumble under the weight of user expectations unmet by developer productivity.

  • Open source fisheries give a fillip to fingerling production
  • Why is collaboration so difficult?

    Many contemporary definitions of "collaboration" define it simply as "working together"—and, in part, it is working together. But too often, we tend to use the term "collaboration" interchangeably with cognate terms like "cooperation" and "coordination." These terms also refer to some manner of "working together," yet there are subtle but important differences between them all.

  • China’s National People’s Congress Officially Promulgates Standardization Law

    The National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China officially promulgated China’s Standardization Law on November 4, 2017. The original Chinese version can be accessed on the China legislature site. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has been closely monitoring the rollout of the reform of China’s standardization system, and has actively engaged the Chinese government throughout the process of updating the standardization law.

read more

The Latest Openwashing

Thu, 2017-11-16 23:12

read more

Security: Boeing 757, Security Education Companion, Kaspersky 'Damage Control' and FUD

Thu, 2017-11-16 23:09

read more

US Government Embrace of FOSS in the Pentagon

Thu, 2017-11-16 22:16

read more

Linux 4.15 Development Updates

Thu, 2017-11-16 21:49

Games: Project Hospital and More

Thu, 2017-11-16 21:40

read more

WordPress 4.9 “Tipton”

Thu, 2017-11-16 20:32

Version 4.9 of WordPress, named “Tipton” in honor of jazz musician and band leader Billy Tipton, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard. New features in 4.9 will smooth your design workflow and keep you safe from coding errors.

Featuring design drafts, scheduling, and locking, along with preview links, the Customizer workflow improves collaboration for content creators. What’s more, code syntax highlighting and error checking will make for a clean and smooth site building experience. Finally, if all that wasn’t pretty great, we’ve got an awesome new Gallery widget and improvements to theme browsing and switching.

read more

GhostBSD 11.1 OS Arrives with Own Software Repository, Drops 32-Bit Support

Thu, 2017-11-16 20:01

More than a year in development, GhostBSD 11.1 is based on FreeBSD 11.1 and comes with Xfce and MATE flavors both available for 64-bit (amd64) systems as 32-bit (i386) support is being dropped starting with this release. This is also the first release of the BSD-based OS to ship with its own software package repository.

"After a year of development, testing, debugging and working on our software package repository, we are pleased to announce the release of GhostBSD 11.1 is now available," reads today's announcement. "With 11.1 we drop 32-bit i386 supports, and we currently maintain our software packages repository for more stability."

Also: GhostBSD 11.1 Released: FreeBSD With MATE & Xfce Desktop Experience

read more

Slax Linux Distro Gets New Release After Two Years, Drops Slackware for Debian

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:59

Slax 9.2.1 is now available for download as the latest stable release of the Linux distro, and it's the first to be based on Debian GNU/Linux. That's right, Slax no longer lives up to its name and drops Slackware for Debian. As its version number suggests, Slax 9.2.1 is based on Debian GNU/Linux 9.2.1 "Stretch."

"After several years of inactivity Slax project has been brought to life again in new version 9.2.1," said the developer in today's release announcement. "I've decided to go for Debian because it made my life much easier and I believe that it will make yours too."

read more

5 Coolest Linux Terminal Emulators

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:55

Sure, we can get by with boring old GNOME terminal, Konsole, and funny, rickety, old xterm. When you're in the mood to try something new, however, take a look at these five cool and useful Linux terminals.

read more

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Will Bring Undecorated Maximized Windows for Mutiny Layout

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:53

First off, the development of Ubuntu MATE 18.04 starts based on the core components of its bigger brother, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, such as the Linux 4.13 kernel, X.Org Server 1.19 display server, Mesa 17.1 graphics stack, and many of the latest security patches from upstream, a.k.a. Debian Testing (Buster) repositories.

And now for the goodies coming to the final Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next year, as Martin Wimpress and his team promise to bring hardware acceleration to Marco, MATE desktop environment's default window manager, as well as undecorated windows for the Mutiny layout for ex-Unity users.

read more

ExLight Linux Distro Now Based on Ubuntu 17.10, Features Enlightenment Desktop

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:52

ExLight Build 171112 is the latest update to the Linux distro, which is based on the recently released Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, but also borrows some package from the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" repositories (a.k.a. Debian Testing).

The biggest change in this release is the replacement of the Linux 4.9 LTS kernel used in previous versions of the distribution with the more recent Linux 4.13 kernel series. ExLight Build 171112 runs a specially crafted kernel 4.13.0-16-exton based on upstream's Linux 4.13.4 kernel.

read more

MX 17 Linux: The Best of 2 Linux Worlds

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:49

MX-17 Beta 1 images are available for download here. If you are looking for a computing platform that is a bit different and very reliable, check out the latest MX 17 Beta releases. Try out the various installation options. See how they work on your slowest legacy hardware.

If you like what you see, keep using the Beta release on USB until the final release of MX 17 comes out shortly. Then you can install it to your computer's hard drive in frugal mode, keep your existing Linux distro where it is, and choose which one to run with each new boot-up.

The beauty of MX Linux is you do not have to deal with wiping or partitioning your hard drive or fussing with the unpredictability of maintaining a dual-boot setup.

MX Linux is a powerful, easy-to-use computing platform that goes beyond lightweight performance without filling your computer with software bloat.

read more

Raspberry Pi 3 clone offers Allwinner H2, H3, or H5 SoCs for $9 to $29

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:47

Libre Computer’s open source “Tritium” SBCs run Ubuntu or Android on Allwinner H2+, H3, or 64-bit H5 SoCs, and have an RPi 3 like layout and 40-pin header.

Earlier this year, Shenzhen-based Libre Computer successfully funded its quad Cortex-A53 Amlogic S905X based Le Potato SBC on Kickstarter for $25 to $35. Now, the company has returned to Kickstarter to launch a second hacker SBC with a Raspberry 3-like form factor, layout, and 40-pin expansion interface. The Tritium is available in packages of $9, $19, or $29, depending on whether you want it configured with the Allwinner H2+, Allwinner H3, or Allwinner H5.

read more

Wandboard.org launches i.MX8M-based SBC with RPi expansion

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:45

Technexion’s Wandboard.org unveiled open source “Wand-Pi-8M” SBCs that run Linux on a quad-A53 i.MX8M, and offer WiFi/BT, GbE, HDMI 2.0, and a 40-pin RPi link.

Technexion and its Wandboard.org community project opened pre-orders on three successors to its i.MX6 based Wandboard and almost identical Wandboard Reload SBCs that tap NXP’s long awaited, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M SoC. Unlike the Wandboards, the smaller, Raspberry Pi like (85 x 56 x 19.3mm) Wand-Pi-8M-Lite ($89), Wand-Pi-8M-Pro ($99), and Wand-Pi-8M-Deluxe ($119), are standard SBCs rather than sandwich-style COM-and-carrier products. The boards ship in Spring 2018.

read more

GNU/Linux in HPC

Thu, 2017-11-16 19:11

read more

10 easy steps from proprietary to open source

Thu, 2017-11-16 11:29

First, we should accept that no software is perfect6. Not proprietary software, not open source software. Second, we should accept that good proprietary software exists, and third, there is also some bad open source software out there. Fourth, there are extremely intelligent, gifted, and dedicated architects, designers, and software engineers who create proprietary software.

But here's the rub: fifth, there is a limited pool of people who will work on or otherwise look at proprietary software. And you can never hire all the best people. Even in government and public sector organisations—who often have a larger talent pool available to them, particularly for cough security-related cough applications—the pool is limited.

read more

Pages