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Updated: 41 min ago

Games for GNU/Linux

Tue, 2016-10-18 14:06

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Clear Linux Now Riding On Linux 4.8.1, Ships AVX2-Optimized Python

Tue, 2016-10-18 13:39

Intel's Clear Linux open-source operating system continues advancing as one of the less heard of but highly performant rolling-release distributions for servers, cloud, containers, and other applications.

Clear Linux Highlights #4 was published today to make known some of the latest improvements. Some of the recent packaging changes include landing GNOME 3.22 components, adding Wayland 1.12, introducing Apache Maven, and updates to various existing packages. Some of the notable updates are using Linux 4.8.1, systemd 231, Vim 8.0, Emacs 25.1, and Node.js 6.8.

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Ubuntu Leftovers

Tue, 2016-10-18 13:32
  • New Tool Lets You Easily Install the Ubuntu Touch OS on Your Mobile Devices

    Softpedia was just informed by Marius Quabeck from UbuntuFun.de about a new tool that lets users super easily install the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on their devices.

    The tool is developed by Marius Quabeck himself and is called magic-device-tool. The first stable version, magic-device-tool 1.0, is now available to everyone and promises to offer a simple and easy-to-use batch tool for installing Canonical's Ubuntu Touch mobile OS, as well as Android, Cyanogenmod, or Phoenix OS.

    In other words, you'll be able to replace your mobile operating system on your device with any of the following: the latest Ubuntu Touch release, Cyanogenmod - with or without the GAPPS (Google Apps) package, the factory Android image, as well as Phoenix OS. Please note that you'll only be able to run one of these OSes on your mobile devices.

  • Canonical Brings Ubuntu OpenStack, Ceph to ARM Servers

    Telco and enterprise customers are looking for an alternative source of silicon beyond Intel for data center silicon, Canonical officials say.
    ARM officials took a step forward in their effort to build the software ecosystem around its efforts in the data center when Canonical said that its Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph offerings are now commercially available on servers powered by ARM's 64-bit chip architecture.

  • Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Storage now available on ARM v8-A

    Unified solution will benefit majority of public cloud services, Canonical explained

    Canonical and ARM have announced a strategic partnership, making Ubuntu OpenStack and Ceph Storage now available on ARM v8-A-based enterprise solutions.

    Working together with Ubuntu certified System on Chip (SoC) partners, ODMs and OEMs, the two companies will ensure the equipment used by customers, such as servers, storage and networking products can be used with Ubuntu Advantage.

    “We have seen our Telecom and Enterprise customers start to radically depart from traditional server design to innovative platform architectures for scale-out compute and storage. In partnering with ARM we bring more innovation and platform choice to the marketplace,” Mark Baker, product manager of OpenStack at Canonical said.

  • Canonical gives Ubuntu Linux 17.04 the name 'Zesty Zapus' (jumping mouse)

    Linux distributions and silly names go together like peanut butter and jelly. For whatever reason, the maintainers of these operating systems seem to enjoy having fun with what they call them -- some argue it is childish. Even Google -- a billion dollar company -- uses sugary dessert names for the Linux-based Android operating system.

    One of the most well-known Linux distributions to use funny names is Ubuntu. It famously uses the convention of an adjective and a lesser-known animal, each starting with the same letter. The letter is chosen sequentially by alphabet. For example, Ubuntu 16.10 uses the letter "Y" -- "Yakkety Yak". The next version of the operating system will use the letter "Z". While many folks hoped for "Zebra", that would be too obvious. Instead, Canonical has chosen "Zesty Zapus". Don't know what a zapus is? Neither did I. It is apparently a type of jumping mouse. The selection was not made at random, however, as the company has an explanation for the decision.

  • Upcoming Zesty Zapus, Bodhi 4 Beta 3

    Mark Shuttleworth today blogged of the "metaphorical" naming of the release has reached the end of the alphabet with 17.04's Zesty Zapus. Apparently, a zapus is "a genus of North American jumping mice," thanks to Wikipedia, and is the only living mammal to have 18 teeth. The genus includes three distinct subspecies and has inhabited Earth since the Pliocene. They have long tails, long back feet, yellowish-brown backs and white bellies. Zesty means "having an agreeably pungent taste," according to the collective dictionary databases of KDict.

  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 - quick screenshot tour

    Ubuntu MATE became an officially supported family member not so long ago. Linux notes from DarkDuck have already published a review of Ubuntu MATE 16.04.

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What the history of open source teaches us about strategic advantage

Tue, 2016-10-18 12:16

The free software movement started like many other movements: A group of bright, spirited people felt controlled by a greater power and rose up and took matters into their own hands.

It's not that different from the American Revolution. The colonists were tired of being controlled by Great Britain, so they declared their independence and started building their own system of government and military, and creating their own cultures. The revolutionaries' methods were disorganized and improvised, but they ultimately proved to be effective. Same goes for the software revolutionaries.

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France renews its two free software support contracts

Tue, 2016-10-18 12:04

The French administration in charge of the public procurement, and DINSIC (the state agency in charge of the IT ) have renewed the two contracts for free software support services. Both contracts were awarded to the French free software services provider Linagora.

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Why enterprises are now opting for open source software

Tue, 2016-10-18 11:31

In March this year, Red Hat became the world’s first open source software (OSS) solutions company to cross $2 billion in revenue. The term open source implies ‘free’ access to software which developers can modify. Not many thought Red Hat would be successful when the company was founded in 1993. However, it has proved its naysayers wrong with a $14.78 billion market cap (as on September 30), $600 million revenue in Q2 FY17 and entry into the Forbes list of the World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 for the fourth time. Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat’s president and CEO, and Rajesh Rege, its India MD, tell Forbes India why enterprises are now opting for open source software.

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12 Top Open Source Data Analytics Apps

Tue, 2016-10-18 03:51

For many large enterprises, open source big data analytics have become an integral part of daily business. According to a 2016 New Vantage Partners survey of executives at Fortune 1000 companies, 62.5 percent of enterprises are now running at least one big data tool or application in production. That's nearly double the number who said the same thing in 2013. And only 5.4 percent of those surveyed had no big data plans.

When it comes to big data analytics, open source software is the rule rather than the exception. Several of the leading tools enterprises are using are managed by the Apache Foundation, and many of the commercial tools are based at least in part on these open source solutions.

In this slideshow, we're featuring twelve of the top open source data analytics solutions. Some of them offer a complete end-to-end platform for big data analytics while others must be combined with other technologies. All of them are suitable for enterprise use and are among the leading tools for data analysis.

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The answer to Internet of Things madness? Open source, of course!

Tue, 2016-10-18 03:12

"Open is always going to win," states Ed Hemphill, CEO of WigWag, a company that hopes to make sense of the ever-expanding and ever-more-complex Internet of Things market.

WigWag is named after the traditional flags used by the US military's Signal Corps to communicate messages. Hemphill and his cofounder Travis McCollum both served in the Signal Corps before starting up their company in Austin, Texas.

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Best Linux Intranet Solutions

Tue, 2016-10-18 03:07

There's a lot of benefits to having your local communications within the confines of your office Intranet. When it comes to keeping content and communications local, there are a number of decent Linux Intranet friendly solutions to serve content to those on your network.

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RPi Compute Module 3 revealed, tapped for NEC signage

Tue, 2016-10-18 03:02

On Oct. 10, NEC Display Solutions Europe announced it would produce a series of digital signage display computers equipped with the upcoming Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3, which runs Linux on the same quad-core Cortex-A53 SoC as the Raspberry Pi 3. On Oct. 14, Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading, made his own announcement of the displays, adding some more details, and today, the datasheet for the Compute Module 3 leaked online.

Long story short: the Compute Module 3 is pin compatible with the original, but will be available in 4GB eMMC and SD-only models. There’s no pricing or close-up photo, but the module will ship by the end of the year.

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GNOME Builder 3.22.1 Adds Support for Sysprof Visualizers, Polishes the UI

Tue, 2016-10-18 02:59

Now that the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment got its first point release, some of the applications distributed as part of the GNOME Stack are getting updated to the 3.22.1 milestone.

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PBS Launches Android Tablet for Kids

Tue, 2016-10-18 02:57

A sub-$100 Android tablet is hitting Best Buy stores in November, and its 16GB of flash storage will be prefilled with so much content you probably won't have room to add your own.

But it's not all adware, as you might expect for such a cheap device. Instead, the more than 25 games and 120 video clips are educational resources from PBS Kids. Dubbed the "Playtime Pad," the $80 tablet is a partnership between PBS and California budget electronics maker Ematic.

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Linux Kernel 4.8 and KDE Plasma 5.8.1 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed Users

Tue, 2016-10-18 02:50

openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger informed the Tumbleweed community about the latest goodies that landed in the stable software repositories of the rolling release operating system during the past week.

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CentOS Linux Vagrant Boxes Gets September's Updates and XFS File System Support

Tue, 2016-10-18 02:48

CentOS maintainer Karanbir Singh announced the availability of updated Vagrant Box images for the CentOS Linux 7 and CentOS Linux 6 operating systems for the month of September 2016.

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today's leftovers

Tue, 2016-10-18 01:41

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Linux and Linux Foundation: JS Foundation, Modern Take on Tux

Tue, 2016-10-18 01:40

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Leftovers: Software

Tue, 2016-10-18 01:39
  • Find Files Faster with FSearch, an ‘Everything Search Engine’ for Linux

    FSearch is a promising new file search utility for the Linux desktop, inspired by the Everything Search Engine tool for Windows.

  • Released OpenStack Newton, Moving OpenStack packages to upstream Gerrit CI/CD

    OpenStack Newton was released on the Thursday 6th of October. I was able to upload nearly all of it before the week-end, though there was a bit of hick-ups still, as I forgot to upload python-fixtures 3.0.0 to unstable, and only realized it thanks to some bug reports. As this is a build time dependency, it didn’t disrupt Sid users too much, but 38 packages wouldn’t build without it. Thanks to Santiago Vila for pointing at the issue here.

    As of writing, a lot of the Newton packages didn’t migrate to Testing yet. It’s been migrating in a very messy way. I’d love to improve this process, but I’m not sure how, if not filling RC bugs against 250 packages (which would be painful to do), so they would migrate at once.

  • Rcpp now used by 800 CRAN packages

    A moment ago, Rcpp hit another milestone: 800 packages on CRAN now depend on it (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo declarations). The graph is on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage over time.

    The easiest way to compute this is to use the reverse_dependencies_with_maintainers() function from a helper scripts file on CRAN. This still gets one or false positives of packages declaring a dependency but not actually containing C++ code and the like. There is also a helper function revdep() in the devtools package but it includes Suggests: which does not firmly imply usage, and hence inflates the count. I have always opted for a tighter count with corrections.

  • backup.sh opensourced

    All the authors agreed to a GPLv2+ licensing, so now it's time for backup.sh to meet the world. It does about the simplest thing you can imagine: ssh to the server and use GNU tar to tar down every filesystem that has the “dump” bit set in fstab. Every 30 days, it does a full backup; otherwise, it does an incremental backup using GNU tar's incremental mode (which makes sure you will also get information about file deletes). It doesn't do inter-file diffs (so if you have huge files that change only a little bit every day, you'll get blowup), and you can't do single-file restores without basically scanning through all the files; tar isn't random-access. So it doesn't do much fancy, but it works, and it sends you a nice little email every day so you can know your backup went well. (There's also a less frequently used mode where the backed-up server encrypts the backup using GnuPG, so you don't even need to trust the backup server.) It really takes fifteen minutes to set up, so now there's no excuse.

  • Skype’s WebRTC Linux app remains in alpha, but it now has video calling [Ed: Video calling worked fine in Skype for GNU/Linux before Microsoft bought and then RUINED it. Stop revisionism.]

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Wayland Live CD

Tue, 2016-10-18 01:37
  • Wayland Live CD release

    I have pushed out new ISO files for the Wayland Live CD project, named after my favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black).

  • Debian Testing Wayland Live CD Updated With Latest Support

    The Live CD Linux distribution focused on showcasing the potential of Wayland across different desktops, toolkits, and applications is out with a new ISO release.

    Developer and Phoronix reader "Nerdopolis" has announced the latest version of his RebeccaBlackOS that packages up the latest Wayland/Weston code and other software supporting Wayland. He announced, "I have pushed out new ISO files for the Wayland Live CD project, named after my favorite celebrity (Rebecca Black). I wanted to time the release to celebrate the release of her new song The Great Divide, but I had some issues I previously had to resolve This might be the last set of ISOs I announce here. I will post newer ISOs/commits, but probably won't announce to the Wayland mailing list."

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Red Hat and Fedora

Tue, 2016-10-18 01:37
  • Red Hat to flaunt open source technologies

    “Making true digital transformation is difficult unless organisations in the Middle East embrace central themes such as software-defined everything, hyperscale, containers and hybrid cloud,” said Lee Miles, General Manager Middle East and Africa, Red Hat. “Proprietary technology will no longer exist as a viable innovation model. Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, will participate in GITEX Technology Week where its focus will be on demonstrating how the company’s open source technologies are helping accelerate business transformation by enabling all these trends.”

  • Analysts Advise About Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Latam conference at Puno in Peru

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Tue, 2016-10-18 01:34
  • Meet Hubot: The DevOps chat bot
  • Google Delivers its own Open Source Report Card

    In recent months, Google has open sourced a slew of useful tools, many of them tested and hardened in-house. They include machine learning applications, 3D visualization tools and more. Now, in a move that should be followed by other companies, Google has announced the 'Open Source Report Card.'

    "Today we're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Josh Simmons, from Google's Open Source Programs Office.

  • IBM i Open Source Roadmap Finds Perl

    Support for open source development on IBM i has been a big deal for the Technology Refresh program. Just last week, with the latest TR announcement, support for Perl was added along with support for the current version of Node.js, which is v6. In previous TRs, we have seen support for programming languages like Ruby and Python, plus tools such as the GNU Compiler Collection and Git. The PHP language, the Eclipse integrated development environment, and the Apache web server are pre-TR open source advancements.

    Compared to Node.js, Python, Ruby, and PHP, there's not much happening in terms of new application development in Perl. It was once one of the big three--Perl, Python, and PHP--recalled consultant Alan Seiden, after I emailed him to discuss open source support on i. Seiden, a PHP subject matter expert, was quick to note PHP originally was a macro language over Perl scripts in the days before PHP was rewritten in C. Perl scripts are under the covers for a ton of open source software.

  • How a healthy developer conference budget can provide a big ROI for organizations

    At OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Emily Hugenbruch, John Arwe, and Ji Chen will give a talk called How to lose clients and alienate coworkers: Lessons learned on an OpenStack enterprise journey. In a recent email interview, Emily, an Advisory Software Engineer and z/VM OpenStack Community Liaison at IBM, discusses the transition developers from proprietary backgrounds must make when they move onto open source projects, and she explains the big ROI on sending developers to conferences.

  • Event report: PyCon India 2016

    This time instead of per day report, I will try to write about things happened during PyCon India. This time we had the conference at JNU, in Delhi. It was nice to be back at JNU after such a long time. The other plus point was about the chance to meet ilug-delhi again.

  • Chrome Remote Desktop 53 adds remote sound support [APK Download]

    Chrome Remote Desktop is a rather obscure Google product, but that doesn't mean it's not useful. Once the desktop application is installed, you can control it from any Android device, iOS device, or computer (with Chrome). In my testing, it actually works extremely well, often with a lower latency than popular remote access applications like TeamViewer.

  • Easier installations, telecom success, and more OpenStack news
  • Instagram open sources iOS UI crash fix
  • OpenBGPD Large Communities

    Back in the early days of The Internet, when routers rode dinosaurs to work and nerds weren't cool, we wanted to signal to our network neighbours certain information about routes. To be fair, we still do. But, back then everyone had 16 bit ASNs, so there was a simple concept called 'communities'. This was a 32bit opaque value, that was traditionally split into two 16bit values. Conveniently, we were able to encode an "us" and a "them", and perform actions based on what our neighbours told us.


    OpenBGPD in OpenBSD -current has support for Large Communities, and this will be available in the 6.1 release and later.

  • Dutch govt ordered to use open standards for comms from 2017

    Government bodies in the Netherlands will have to use open technology standards for communications after next year, following a vote by the nation's parliament.

    The requirement for open document standards has already been adopted by the Netherlands Senate, but a motion by Member of Parliament Astrid Oosenbrug has now unified the policy. She said the lower house would be the first government body to standardize around the use of Open Document Format (ODF).

    "We should set the right example," she said. "Ironically, lower house published the adopted law on its website by providing a download link to a document in a proprietary format."

    As part of the new legislation, the government will also promote the use of open source code across government and the private sector. Michiel Leenaars, head of the Dutch Internet Society, welcomed the move.

  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Ubuntu 16.10, FreeBSD 11, Android 7.1, And More
  • Open data as a game

    Around the world something interesting is happening: Governments, and even a few private companies, are opening up huge stores of data they've been collecting over decades.

  • Tech giants collaborate on open source specs for faster servers
  • Big Tech Companies Announce OpenCAPI Consortium To Develop Open Hardware For Servers
  • OpenCAPI Looks to Redefine Server Architecture Beyond PCIe
  • Razor Releases 2nd Gen Open Source VR Development Kit

    Razer is part of the Open-Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) ecosystem, a new standard in VR gaming to push the VR gaming experience forward and supporting the venture with the OSVR Hacker Dev Kit, a virtual reality device and open-source software that enables programming for any variety of VR technology.

  • VK9: Still Pursuing Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan

    VK9 is the project formerly known as SchaeferGL as an open-source project implementing Direct3D 9 over Vulkan.

    It's been a few months since originally writing about this open-source project and fortunately pleased this week to see its development continuing, albeit now under the name VK9. The developer, Christopher Schaefer, recently passed his "third milestone" with getting to the point where the geometry is correctly being passed to the render pipeline, texture loading is beginning to work, etc.

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