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Updated: 17 min 51 sec ago

CLIP OS, Like Chrome OS, is Based on Gentoo

Fri, 2018-10-05 03:42

ANSSI, the National Cybersecurity Agency of France, has released the sources of CLIP OS, that aims to build a hardened, multi-level operating system, based on the Linux kernel and a lot of free and open source software. We are happy to hear that it is based on Gentoo Hardened!

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Windows Wipes

Fri, 2018-10-05 03:38
  • Bug in Windows 10’s Latest Update Might Be Deleting Files, Back Up Your Data Now

    Multiple Windows users are reporting the latest update is deleting documents. Consider backing up your data right now.

  • Windows 10 October 2018 Update Is Apparently Wiping Out User Data

    Windows 10 October 2018 update was announced a while back and Microsoft mentioned that the new update would come with support for DirectX Ray Tracing. The API that will support Nvidia RTX graphics cards with features like ray tracing and DLSS.

    It turns out, the update is now being halted due to an issue with Intel drivers that are causing some unexpected problems. Some people have reported losing their data when updating to Windows 10 October 2018 update. Rollback is also not something that will solve this issue as it turns out, once you update your data is gone and it’s pretty much irreversible.

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Interview With Peter Ganten, CEO of Univention GmbH

Fri, 2018-10-05 03:31

I have been asking the Univention team to share the behind-the-scenes story of Univention for a couple months. Finally, today we got the interview of Mr.Peter H. Ganten, CEO of Univention GmbH. Despite his busy schedule, in this interview, he shares what he thinks of the Univention project and its impact on open source ecosystem, what open source developers and companies will need to do to keep thriving and what are the biggest challenges for open source projects.

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The October 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Thu, 2018-10-04 19:25

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2018 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

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today's leftovers

Thu, 2018-10-04 18:17
  • PulseAudio Lands Big Improvements For Its Meson Build System

    PulseAudio has been slower than some of the other prominent open-source projects at moving to the Meson build system, but as of last night it appears a bulk of that new build system is in place.

    Back in June is when some initial bits of the Meson build system were merged to the PulseAudio sound server code base and then a few commits here and there pertaining to this Autotools alternative.

  • This week focuses on Slackware 14.2 packages

    The admins over there at slackbuilds.org have updated their version of the Qt5 build script (targeting Slackware 14.2) to 5.9.6, i.e. the latest version of the Long Term Support (LTS) for Qt5.

    That triggered me to provide the same service for my own package repository targeting Slackware 14.2. Since more and more software is depending on Qt5, a lot of people will have some qt5 package installed, either built from the SBo script or installed from my repository. In order to minimize breakage, I think it is good if SBo’s and mine are the same version so that it should not matter which one you have installed.

    So, I did a chained upgrade: libwacom (0.31), libinput (1.7.3), libxkbcommon (0.8.2), qt5 (5.9.6) and qt5-webkit (5.9.1) in that order to take care of dependencies. The latest releases of these packages are now available for Slackware 14.2. Note that for the 32bit Slackware 14.2, the libwacom package is a new dependency for both libinput and qt5. My repository contained a pretty old 32bit qt5 package (5.7.0) which was not built against libwacom.

  • What is agile?

    I know you are thinking, "Not another Agile 101 article!" We were, too. There are many resources that describe what agile is, talk about the history of the concept, and go into depth about why it is important. This article is not any of those things—rather, we would like you to forget everything you've been told; everything you've learned, read, or otherwise acquired via misuse of the term or misdeed in implementing it.

  • Stocks with Performance Valuation Turns Game Changers- Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Old Ceiling Or A New Floor? Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Stumbles, Yet Again
  • What we learned building a Zuul CI/CD cloud

    Contributing to open source projects such as OpenStack traditionally involves individuals and companies providing code contributions that add new features and fix bugs. For nearly two years, I’ve been running one-off OpenStack clouds for demonstrations and labs at user group meetings across the US, using hardware donated from bare-metal service provider Packet. Six months ago, Packet asked how they could make a larger donation to the community, which brought us on our path to build a community cloud to support OpenStack.

    Each day, hundreds of code commits to the OpenStack code base need to be tested as part of the continuous integration system managed by Zuul, "a program that drives continuous integration, delivery, and deployment systems with a focus on project gating and interrelated projects." Each commit runs through a series of tests (or gates) before a human review, and the gates run again before a code merge. All of these gates run across a pool of virtual machines instances (more than 900 instances at peak times) donated by a number of public cloud providers. All of the OpenStack CI is dependent on donated computing resources. The OpenStack Infra team coordinates all of these cloud providers and served as our point of contact for donating these resources.

  • UN Panel Starts Consultations On Digital Cooperation: Philosophy and Practice

    There is a lot of energy and good dynamism, and some worries, too, about the immensity of the task ahead in the United Nations High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, Jovan Kurbalija, executive director of Panel’s Secretariat, said after the first face-to-face meeting last week and subsequent virtual town hall on 1 October. According to the mandate, the panel shall in less than a year present recommendations on ways and means for cooperation on digital policies and digital risks.

  • Icestorm Tools Roundup: Open Source FPGA Dev Guide

    We like the ICE40 FPGA from Lattice for two reasons: there are cheap development boards like the Icestick available for it and there are open source tools. We’ve based several tutorials on the Icestorm toolchain and it works quite well. However, the open source tools don’t always expose everything that you see from commercial tools. You sometimes have to dig a little to find the right tool or option.

    Sometimes that’s a good thing. I don’t need to learn yet another fancy IDE and we have plenty of good simulation tools, so why reinvent the wheel? However, if you are only using the basic workflow of Yosys, Arachne-pnr, icepack, and iceprog, you could be missing out on some of the most interesting features. Let’s take a deeper look.

  • Thank you for participating in International Day Against DRM 2018!

    Thank you everyone for helping to make September 18th another successful International Day Against DRM (IDAD)! Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) is an issue we have to face every day. In rallying together for a single day against DRM, we sent a powerful message: DRM is just wrong and we can live in a society without it.

    Hundreds of you around the world took action on IDAD: going out into your campuses, communities, and around the Web, and sharing your opposition to how DRM restricts your freedom as a user of software and media. The 17 participating organizations took their own actions, creating videos, releasing reports, and writing articles. Here in Boston, we visited the Apple Store and talked with shoppers about their digital rights and how Apple devices abuse those rights using DRM.

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RADV vs. AMDVLK vs. Radeon Software Vulkan Driver Performance - October 2018 Linux Gaming

Thu, 2018-10-04 18:05

Given AMD's weekly updating of the public AMDVLK Vulkan driver source tree as their official open-source Vulkan Linux driver while RADV continues to be maintained as the popular open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within the Mesa source tree, here is a fresh look at how those competing drivers perform. Additionally there are the results from Radeon Software / AMDGPU-PRO using its closed-source Vulkan driver that is derived from the same sources as AMDVLK but built against AMD's proprietary shader compiler.

This round of benchmarking is a look at the fresh AMD Vulkan Linux driver performance on these three options when testing with a Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 graphics cards. The same Core i7 8086K system was used the entire time (obviously) and it was running with Ubuntu 18.04 on the Linux 4.19-rc6 kernel. The Vulkan driver configurations came down to...

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Accelerated Linux boosts real-time performance on Zynq UltraScale+

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:58

Enea has launched a real-time “Accelerated Linux” version of its Enea Linux distro that targets the Zynq UltraScale+. The dual-OS hypervisor solution combines Enea Linux with an SMP micro-kernel executive.

In 2012, Swedish telecom-focused enterprise software vendor Enea, which is known for its Enea OSEck RTOS, launched a carrier-grade Enea Linux distribution, which combined its earlier Enea Linux Project Framework (ELPH) distro with a Yocto Project foundation. In 2014, Enea launched a free, community-backed Open Enea Linux, but that project appears to have folded. Now, Enea has returned with a new Accelerated Linux distro that offers even greater real-time capabilities than the standard Enea Linux. The initial version is optimized for Xilinx’s 64-bit Arm/FPGA hybrid Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC.

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LibreOffice Qt5 Integration, Qt-based Krita 4.2 is Coming and GNOME Games 3.30 Suffering "Features Overload"

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:52
  • LibreOffice Qt5 Integration Sees Further Improvements

    The past year LibreOffice has sported a Qt5 interface plug-in for better integration with Qt-based environments like a better "KDE 5" experience. In recent days has been more improvements to this Qt5 integration.

    Hitting the LibreOffice Git tree over the past week has been initial a11y support (accessibility) while landing today was the initial Qt5 clipboard support.

  • Looking forward to Krita 4.2!

    Everyone is hard at work, and what will become Krita 4.2 is taking shape already. Today we’re presenting a preview of Krita 4.2. It’s not complete yet, and there ARE bugs. More than in the stable release (we’ll be doing a 4.1.4 after all next week to clear up some more bugs…), and some might make you lose work.

  • Games 3.30: Features Overload

    With a new version of GNOME always comes a new version of Games, and this new version comes packed with new features, bug fixes and developer experience improvements.

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Security: Facebook, Microsoft and Fruitfly

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:45
  • Facebook hack: People's accounts appear for sale on dark web
  • Hacked Facebook Logins Are Available On Dark Web Just For $3.90: Report
  • Huge Facebook breach leaves thousands of other apps vulnerable

    Unfortunately, from a security standpoint, using Facebook or any other social media app to log into other services is not a smart thing to do, says Dana Simberkoff, chief risk, privacy, and information security officer for the enterprise security firm AvePoint.

  • Using Microsoft's Dynamics 365 Finance and Operations? Using Skype? Not for long!

    The issue, which could stop a user being able to sign in, affects Microsoft's Dynamics 365 for Finance and Operations in an on-premises environment. A "refactoring" in the way Skype authenticates its users has been blamed.

    Skype integration provides real-time presence and communication for Dynamics 365 users, and for some older versions of the Finance and Operations platform the integration is enabled by default. In these instances, Microsoft strongly recommends manually disabling it.

    [...]

    Microsoft has not been clear when integration with Skype can be switched back on, saying only that the problem could occur "during this update". The Register has contacted the software giant to get a definitive time frame and will update if one is forthcoming.

  • Cameron Kaiser: Fruitfly and the Power Mac

    The history the FBI relates suggests that early infections were initiated manually by him, largely for the purpose of catching compromising webcam pictures and intercepting screenshots and logins when users entered keystrokes suggesting sexual content. If you have an iSight with the iris closed, though, there was no way he could trigger that because of the hardware cutoff, another benefit of having an actual switch on our computer cameras (except the iMac G5, which was a bag of hurt anyway and one of the few Power Macs I don't care for).

    Fruitfly spreads by attacking weak passwords for AFP (Apple Filing Protocol) servers, as well as RDP, VNC, SSH and (on later Macs) Back to My Mac. Fortunately, however, it doesn't seem to get its hooks very deep into the OS. It can be relatively easily found by looking for a suspicious launch agent in ~/Library/LaunchAgents (a Power Mac would undoubtedly be affected by variant A, so check ~/Library/LaunchAgents/com.client.client.plist first), and if this file is present, launchctl unload it, delete it, and delete either ~/.client or ~/fpsaud depending on the variant the system was infected with. After that, change all your passwords and make sure you're not exposing those services where you oughtn't anymore!

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Programming: Join GNU Guix Through Outreachy, Functional Programming in Python, Kiwi TCMS 6.0, littler/CRAN

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:42
  • Join GNU Guix through Outreachy

    We are happy to announce that for the second time this year, GNU Guix offers a three-month internship through Outreachy, the inclusion program for groups traditionally underrepresented in free software and tech.

  • Functional programming in Python: Immutable data structures

    In this two-part series, I will discuss how to import ideas from the functional programming methodology into Python in order to have the best of both worlds.

    This first post will explore how immutable data structures can help. The second part will explore higher-level functional programming concepts in Python using the toolz library.

  • Kiwi TCMS 6.0

    This release removes squashed migrations. Direct upgrades from versions < 5.3.1 to 6.0 will break without an intermediate upgrade to 5.3.1!

  • littler 0.3.5: Other kids broke my toys

    The sixth release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than twelve-year history as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

    littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. And it is (in my very biased eyes) better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It also always loaded the methods package which Rscript converted to rather recently.

    littler lives on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on macOS due to yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems as a default where a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet – the build system could be extended – see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers are welcome!).

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14 common network ports you should know

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:38

Within computer networking, ports serve a similar purpose. When a computer system seeks to connect to another computer, the port serves as a communication endpoint. It is also possible for different services running on the same computer to expose various ports and communicate with one another using these ports. In simple terms, if a software application or service needs to communicate with others, it will expose a port. Ports are identified with positive 16-bit unsigned integers, ranging from 0 to 65535. Other services use this port number to communicate with the service or app. Port numbers are divided into three ranges: well-known ports, registered ports, and dynamic or private ports.

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More Android Leftovers

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:13

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Google/Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Leftovers

Thu, 2018-10-04 17:11
  • 10 Productivity Gmail Extensions for Your Browser

    Gmail is used by 500+ million people but how many of us make the best use of it? Yes, it’s a convenient email client to use but what if I told you that Gmail is capable of way more functions than it offers you at the moment?

    The same way applications use plugins is the same way Gmail does, and here are 10 that will boost your productivity.

  • How is Crosh Different From the Linux Terminal on a Chromebook?

    As of Chrome OS 69, support for Linux applications is a baked in part of the operating system. Once enabled, this installs the Terminal on your Chrome OS system, but what is it and how does it compare to Crosh?

    Don’t worry if all that sounds like gibberish to you—if you’ve never spent any time poking around in your Chromebook’s guts, then you’ve likely never used (or even heard of) Crosh. And if you’ve never used Linux before, well, then you’ve never had to bother with the Terminal. The good news is that we’re going to make sense of both things today.

    [...]

    The Terminal and Crosh are similar tools—in fact, they’re the same basic concept, but the Terminal is specifically for the Linux aspect of Chrome OS, where Crosh is for the Chrome OS side.

    You’d be forgiven if that doesn’t make a lot of sense right out of the gate—they’re both running on the same machine, at the same time after all. But they’re not connected.

    One of the biggest benefits of Chrome OS is its enhanced security. As a result, most things on the operating system run in an independent sandbox. That means that most elements don’t really interact with each other—for example, if a single tab suffers a failure and crashes, the other tabs in the browser window aren’t affected.

  • Helping you to tackle the midterms on your terms

    For many people, a confusing tangle of cyberjargon and misinformation have combined to make the idea of turning to the web for election information a weird proposition.

    [...]

    We’re doing this to make it easy for people across the political spectrum to participate this November and beyond.

    We want to help make sure that the web isn’t being used to manipulate, misinform, and limit you from accessing all the information you need to make an informed choice.

    In addition to the Firefox election tools, we have other resources to help you.

  • WebRender newsletter 24

    Hi there, this your twenty fourth WebRender newsletter. A lot of work in progress this week, so the change list is pretty short. To compensate I added a list of noteworthy ongoing work which hasn’t landed yet is but will probably land soon and gives a rough idea of what’s keeping us busy.

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Games Leftovers

Thu, 2018-10-04 16:24

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Tails 3.9.1 is out

Thu, 2018-10-04 15:58

This release is an emergency release to fix critical security vulnerabilities in Tor Browser and Thunderbird.

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Test drive GNOME 3.30 with the Fedora 29 prerelease

Thu, 2018-10-04 15:53

Last month, the GNOME project announced the release of GNOME 3.30. The good news is that this new version of GNOME is default in the forthcoming release of Fedora 29 Workstation. GNOME 3.30 includes a range of new features and enhancements, including improvements to Files (nautilus), and the new Podcasts application.

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