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KDE vs. GNOME, X.Org vs. Wayland Radeon Linux Gaming Performance With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Sat, 2018-05-12 23:10

For those wondering how the Radeon Linux gaming performance is changed between desktop environments when testing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS out-of-the-box, here are some benchmarks. Not only is it looking at the performance between GNOME Shell 3.28.1 and KDE Plasma 5.12.4, but it's also comparing each desktop environment with its X.Org and Wayland session support. Additionally, these tests were done with both AMD Radeon Polaris and Vega graphics cards.

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today's leftovers

Sat, 2018-05-12 15:48
  • Mark Text: FOSS Markdown Editor With Realtime Preview

    Mark Text is a fairly new free, open source Markdown editor for Linux, Windows and Mac. Aimed at improving your editing efficiency, the editor supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec.

    The application tries not to get in your way, by using a clean interface that tries to focus on your writing and nothing more, with a seamless live preview, while still allowing you to easily access its menu or see the current file name.

  • MySql DataTime/TimeStamp fields and Scala
  • Making Videos (that work in Firefox) from a Series of Images
  • Linux Fun – Play Old Classic Snake Game in Linux Terminal

    msnake is the Linux command line version of the most popular old classic snake game was written in C using ncurses library by Mogria and Timo Furrer. The game can be played at terminal with textual interface in almost all GNU/Linux distributions.

    The game is highly customizable and includes free/classic gameplay modes, keybindings, and even the GUI-like appearance of the application.

    To run msnake game on all modern Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora and Arch Linux, simply install it from the snapd package management software as shown.

  • Linuxfx LTS 9.0

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Encryption in Gentoo and GNOME

Sat, 2018-05-12 15:46
  • On OpenPGP (GnuPG) key management

    Over the time, a number of developers have had problems following the Gentoo OpenPGP key policy (GLEP 63. In particular, the key expiration requirements have resulted in many developers wanting to replace their key unnecessarily. I’ve been asked to write some instructions on managing your OpenPGP key, and I’ve decided to go for a full blog post with some less-known tips. I won’t be getting into detailed explanations how to use GnuPG though — you may still need to read the documentation after all.

    [...]

    Signing keys are used to sign data, i.e. to prove its authenticity. Using multiple signing subkeys is rather trivial — you can explicitly specify the key to use while creating a signature (note that you need to append ! to key-id to force non-default subkey), and GnuPG will automatically use the correct subkey when verifying the signature. To reduce the wear of your main signing subkey, you can create a separate signing subkey for Gentoo commits. Or you can go ever further, and have a separate signing subkey for each machine you’re using (and keep only the appropriate key on each machine).

  • Fractal Hackfest, Strasbourg (day 2)

    The encryption is a needed feature but encryption is hard to do in rooms. Matrix uses public-key cryptography, for rooms they are using Megolm, that's a protocol to exchange encrypted messages with more than one and share that message keys in a one-to-one secure communication.

    I don't know a lot about this E2E because for me it's more important to have the client working with a basic functionality before the encryption. So you should read the official doc because maybe this that I'm writing here is completely wrong.

    To do all this E2E key sharing, client side encryption and communication, Riot has three different implementations of the same lib, so they have this code in the JavaScript SDK, the same ported to iOS version in ObjectiveC and the same ported to Android in Java. Below this lib there's the libolm that does the real encryption.

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KDE: Kdenlive Sprint and Krita 4.0.3 Released

Sat, 2018-05-12 15:44
  • Kdenlive Sprint - The Movie

    Kdenlive is KDE's advanced video-editor. This April, members of the Kdenlive project met up for five days - from 25th to the 29th - for their spring sprint. The developers Jean-Baptiste Mardelle and Nicolas Carion, along with professional community videomakers Farid Abdelnour, Rémi Duquenne and Massimo Stella, got together at the Carrefour Numérique in Paris to push the project forward.

  • Krita 4.0.3 Released

    Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.3, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. This release fixes an important regression in Krita 4.0.2: sometimes copy and paste between images opened in Krita would cause crashes (BUG:394068).

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Graphics: X.Org Server 1.20, NVIDIA 396.18.11, Mesa 18.1

Sat, 2018-05-12 15:40
  • Several DDX Drivers Aren't Yet Ready For X.Org Server 1.20

    If you were hoping to build the newly-released X.Org Server 1.20 on your system(s) this weekend, be forewarned that a number of the DDX drivers haven't yet been updated for supporting the API/ABI changes of this big server update.

    A number of the smaller, obscure drivers like Tseng, SiS, R128, and March64 haven't yet been updated for xorg-server 1.20 support but also the more prominent xf86-video-ati and xf86-video-amdgpu DDX drivers have not yet seen new releases with xorg-server 1.20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.18.11 Linux Vulkan Driver Released With Fixes

    The NVIDIA 396.18.11 Vulkan beta driver for Linux was released on Friday as pulling in the latest upstream fixes to the Vulkan beta driver branch for Windows and Linux.

    The 396.18.11 Linux driver and 397.76 Windows driver pull in the latest fixes from their general release driver. For the Linux release, it comes just three days after another small beta update (396.18.08) that was released to fix Alt-Tab freezing with the DXVK Direct3D11-over-Vulkan implementation.

  • Mesa 18.1 Expected To Officially Debut Next Week

    While Mesa 18.0 debuted just about one and a half months ago, the fourth and final release candidate of Mesa 18.1 is now available for testing as the next quarterly feature installment to these primarily OpenGL/Vulkan open-source drivers.

    First time Mesa release manager Dylan Baker issued Mesa 18.1.0-RC4 this Friday evening with 25 queued patches. The affected work ranges from core Mesa fixes to Gallium3D, R600, RADV, RadeonSI, i965, and ANV fixes... Pretty much fixes across the board at least as far as the major drivers are concerned sans Nouveau.

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OSS Leftovers

Sat, 2018-05-12 15:39
  • Considering an RSAC Expo booth? Our Experience, in 5,000 words or less

     

    So we decided to try a booth for 2018, and figured we'd document our experience (and thoughts) along the way. In this post you'll find a full breakdown of all our costs for attending and boothing at RSAC, including what it takes to get a space; kitting it out with furniture, equipment, swag and more; staffing the booth; the crazy that is conference pricing; and the logistics for actually making it happen.

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2018

    OpenStack Summit is the leading event in Open Infrastructure, bringing together the builders and operators for sessions and workshops on containers, CI/CD, telecom & NFV, public cloud, multi-cloud and more.

  • rr Chaos Mode Improvements

    rr's chaos mode introduces nondeterminism while recording application execution, to try to make intermittent bugs more reproducible. I'm always interested in hearing about bugs that cannot be reproduced under chaos mode, especially if those bugs have been diagnosed. If we can figure out why a bug was not reproducible under chaos mode, we can often extend chaos mode to make it reproducible, and this improves chaos mode for everyone. If you encounter such a bug, please file an rr issue about it.

  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 6

    The team and community continue to add new features, fix bugs, and respond to early user and developer feedback to deliver a solid experience across Firefox Reality, Hubs and the content related projects.

  • Best free and open source Microsoft Excel alternatives
  • Microsoft's Latest Excel Update Has Security Pros Anxious

     

    [...] But JavaScript also creates more interconnection and more access points—meaning more points of potential vulnerability. It's already a bit of a web security nightmare. And on top of that, attackers have long shown their willingness to exploit customization and automation features in Excel—and other Microsoft Office programs—to create malicious files for phishing and other attacks. The ubiquity of Microsoft Office files make them the perfect vector for tricking victims and wreaking havoc.

  • Windows Subsystem for Linux - Many distros!
  • $125 Million Richer, Mesosphere Tackles Big Data at the Edge [Ed: Be very careful of Mesos and Mesosphere. Microsoft people, those who participated in competition crimes, are funding it and Microsoft attempted a literal takeover.]
  • New release of eiffel-iup

    It is already available a new version of eiffel-iup, a Liberty Eiffel wrapper to IUP toolkit. So you can build your graphical application from Eiffel using Liberty Eiffel, the GNU implementation of Eiffel language. So happy hacking.

  • Gnome Login Screen Redesign, CentOS Update, VirtualBox, Mender Team and IoT

    Oracle recently announce the available of VirtualBox 5.2.12. This latest update includes support for the Linux 4.17 kernel, alongside your typical bug fixes.

  • Linux for developers comes to Chrome OS, using AR to assist surgeons, and more open source news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Linux for developers coming to Chrome OS, a tool that uses AR to assist surgeons, and more.

  • Java: Executing code in comments?!

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System76 vs. The LVFS Firmware Updating Service

Sat, 2018-05-12 15:18

This week the latest open-source drama was a differing of opinions between Richard Hughes of Red Hat who maintains Fwupd and LVFS for Linux firmware updating from the desktop and that of Linux PC vendor System76.

Richard Hughes volleyed a blog post that recommend not buying System76 hardware for those wanting firmware updates via LVFS (the Linux Vendor Firmware Service). He wrote that post based upon System76 not currently using UEFI UpdateCapsule for BIOS updates, System76 developing a Rust tool to flash the embedded controller, and them rolling out their own firmware update handler that officially targets Ubuntu and Pop!_OS. Richard then encouraged Linux users to buy Dell XPS laptops instead.

Richard's post in full can be read here.

On Friday, System76 responded to those accusations. According to System76, Richard expressed via email that the approach System76 is using for firmware updating likely wouldn't work with LVFS and also their distributing of a proprietary firmware flashing tool likely wouldn't be approved by Red Hat legal and they also found flashing the embedded controler from user-space to be sub-optimal.

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Scientific Linux 7.5 Released As RHEL 7.5 Rebuild

Sat, 2018-05-12 14:56

Testing of the release candidate earlier this month went well and out now is the official Scientific Linux 7.5 release.

Scientific Linux 7.5 is the re-spin derived from upstream Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 and its many changes/improvements.

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FreeBSD 11.2 Beta Now Available For Testing

Sat, 2018-05-12 14:54

FreeBSD 11.2 has reached the beta milestone to succeed FreeBSD 11.1 from last year and ahead of FreeBSD 12.0 that is expected this November.

FreeBSD 11.2 is targeted for release around the end of June but before then they expect to do a total of three beta releases and up to three release candidates.

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Even Microsoft Admits Its Products Are Inherently Faulty

Sat, 2018-05-12 12:10
  • Microsoft to replace Surface Pro 4 tablets affected by screen flickering

    Microsoft is formally launching a replacement program for Surface Pro 4 devices affected by screen flickering. Any Surface Pro 4 units experiencing the problem will be covered for up to three years from the time of original purchase. “We have heard your feedback and after careful examination, have determined that a small percentage of Surface Pro 4 devices are exhibiting a screen flicker that cannot be addressed with a firmware or driver update,” the company said on its support page with details on the program.

    The annoying flickering has been well-documented on Microsoft’s support forums, with some users taking drastic steps like putting their Surface Pro 4 in a freezer to temporarily fix the issue. Back in February, Microsoft said it was closely monitoring the situation, and the company came to the conclusion that there’s no convenient fix.

  • Microsoft can’t fix “flickergate” Surface Pro 4s with software, so it’s replacing them
  • Don't Skype Me: How Microsoft Turned Consumers Against a Beloved Brand

    In March tech investor and commentator Om Malik summarized the negativity by tweeting that Skype was “a turd of the highest quality” and directing his ire at its owner. “Way to ruin Skype and its experience. I was forced to use it today, but never again.”

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Get Privacy Tools on Ubuntu 18.04

Sat, 2018-05-12 11:09

If you are already aware about 2013 global privacy case, I believe you care about your internet privacy by now. If you just switched to Ubuntu, here's a list of user-friendly programs (free software only) and search engine to protect your privacy. You will find my recommendation of a web search engine, a specific web browser, add-ons, email client enhancements, and password storage. This list accompanies the previous list of 20 useful programs for 18.04.

[...]

Free software is not gratis software but software that the user is free. Free software is about the user's right, either individually or collectively, to control over the software. If you run your activities with nonfree software (also called proprietary), you don't control the whole things software does within your computer, which only means there is somebody else controlling you and the computers. To protect your privacy, you should make sure you run only free software and relies only on privacy-respecting internet services.

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Slackware is Moving to XOrg 1.20 and Slackware 14.2 Gets "Love"

Sat, 2018-05-12 11:05
  • Moving to XOrg 1.20
  • Let’s show some love to 14.2

    With all the excitement going on about the disruptive changes in Slackware-current (migration to the new C++ ABI caused all of Slackware to be recompiled, and then the upgrade of openssl to 1.1 caused many packages to be recompiled again), I had to spend all of my time and CPU power to keep up with the changes and fix my packages for -current.
    That meant, less attention to the package updates for Slackware 14.2. I realize I left the users of our stable release somewhat in the cold.
    I am going to do something about that. During the next weeks I will try to bridge the gap that had been expanding for package versions in my own repository, between 14.2 and -current.

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KDE: FreeText, Modern C++ and Qt, KDE Partition Manager

Sat, 2018-05-12 10:58
  • FreeText typewriter annotation WYSIWYG implementation ideas

    As a part of the GSoC project, I’m working with my mentor Tobias Deiminger on implementing the FreeText typewriter annotation with click-to-type WYSIWYG editing feature in Okular to write directly on PDF page.

  • Modern C++ and Qt – part 2.

    I recently did a short tongue-in-cheek blog post about Qt and modern C++. In the comments, people discovered that several compilers effectively can optimize std::make_unique<>().release() to a simple new statement, which was kind of a surprise to me.

    I have recently written a new program from scratch (more about that later), and I tried to force myself to use standard library smartpointers much more than what I normally have been doing.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 – Community Bonding Part 2: Studies about LVM

    As I said in my previous post, I’m using this community bonding period to understand how LVM works in kpmcore. It involved studying about how the three parts of LVM (Physical Volumes, Volume Groups and Logical Volumes) work in the library and how this logic was implemented.

    In this text, I’m intending to give a short explanation about LVM, discuss about some plannings related to the process of creation of LVM VGs in Calamares and talk about some corrections related to it that I’ve implemented in kpmcore and KDE Partition Manager.

    [...]

    Community Bonding period is almost finishing, but I’ll write another post about it before that, talking a little bit about my studies involving RAID arrays and which are my ideas to implementing it. See you later!

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Security: Google, Blockchains and More

Sat, 2018-05-12 10:53
  • Google will soon require OEMs to roll out ‘regular’ Android security patches
  • Google Updates Chrome for Desktop to Fix Privilege Escalation Bug in Extensions

    Google released on Thursday a new stable version of its Chrome 66 web browser, version 66.0.3359.170, which is currently rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows users, to fix a few important security issues.

  • Will Blockchains Include Insecurity by Design?

    Ask any journalist to pick an adjective to use in connection with standards development and the answer will invariably be "boring." But according to a recent New York Times article (yes, it also used that word - as well as "wonky"), the process of creating standards just became a whole lot more interesting - at least when it comes to the blockchain. The reason? A standards working group may have been infiltrated by state actors bent on embedding security flaws into the very standards being created for the purpose of preventing attacks.

    And why not? The power of a successful standard comes from the fact that vendors have to adopt it in order to sell a given product or service, such as a WiFi router or a USB device. Indeed, laptops and smart phones include hundreds of standards, each of which is essential to a given function or service. As I noted last week, the blockchain will need standards, too, in order for it to take hold in multiple areas. Some of those standards will be intended to make the blockchain more secure.

  • 6 Things You Should Do to Secure Your NAS
  • Packets over a LAN are all it takes to trigger serious Rowhammer bit flips

    For the first time, researchers have exploited the Rowhammer memory-chip weakness using nothing more than network packets sent over a local area network. The advance is likely to further lower the bar for triggering bit flips that change critical pieces of data stored on vulnerable computers and servers.

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Fedora: Review of Fedora 28, LibreCAD, Custom Fedora Live Media, EPEL Outage Report

Sat, 2018-05-12 10:44
  • Fedora 28: Another Release for Power Users

    Fedora is widely recognized to be a smooth Linux distribution with up-to-date software, and is also used by a lot of developers around the world. Just around a 10 days ago Fedora 28 was released, bringing many changes and updated software.

    This review will guide you through the new release and what to expect so far.

    [...]

    Fedora 28 is yet another updated release for power users around the world. With updated software and some interesting new features and battery optimizations, Fedora 28 can be a good choice if you are looking for the latest stable up-to-date packages or you would like to get software just as they are from upstream.

    You may, however, face one of the common bugs in Fedora 28 of face crashes and hangs like we did, but this doesn’t mean that it’s not worth to try. Your experience on your hardware may be different than ours.

  • Fedora 28 : The LibreCAD application.
  • Custom Fedora Live Media
  • EPEL Outage Report 2018-11-05

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Games: Mission Critical, GameMode and Dust Racing 2D

Sat, 2018-05-12 10:37
  • Classic sci-fi adventure 'Mission Critical' is now on GOG with a Linux version

    Fancy a space adventure? How about a classic? Mission Critical has recently made its way onto GOG and it has a Linux version.

    Released by Legend Entertainment way back in 1995, when I was just a wee lad, Mission Critical was really well reviewed with some going as far as calling it a "masterpiece".

  • Feral's GameMode 1.1 Released For Optimizing Linux Gaming Performance

    One month ago Linux game porter Feral Interactive introduced GameMode as a utility/service for dynamically optimizing the Linux system performance when running games. The initial focus on GameMode was on ensuring the CPU scaling governor was in its performance mode while today brought the GameMode v1.1 release.

    In the month since publicly unveiling GameMode, there has been dozens of commits going into this tool to "optimize Linux system performance on demand" though at the moment still largely remains focused on setting the Intel/AMD CPU frequency scaling driver's governor. But a lot of infrastructure work is now laid so hopefully soon we will see GameMode expand to offer more performance tweaks/optimizations.

  • Dust Racing 2D – An Open Source Car Racing Game Written in Qt And OpenGL

    Howdy, game lovers! Today, you can add one more cool game to your collection. Say hello to “Dust Racing 2D”, a traditional top-down (aerial-view) car racing game that makes your holidays fun and interesting. It is available as single or two-player mode, so your friend can join in the race and play along with you. It is a free, open source and cross-platform game written in Qt (C++) and OpenGL. Dust Racing 2D is currently available for Linux and Windows. In this tutorial, we will be learning how to install and play Dust Racing 2D game in Linux.

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GNOME: GNOME Web, Purism, Report From Fractal Hackfest

Sat, 2018-05-12 10:11
  • Work is Underway to Make the GNOME Web Browser Mobile Friendly

    To do well, the upcoming Linux-powered Librem 5 smartphone will need a decent set of mobile-ready apps — and a good web browser is key to that.

    Hoping to step up to the plate is GNOME Web (aka Epiphany), whose developers are working hard to make sure that the webkit-based browser is in fine form for finger-friendly fun while surfing.

  • Purism wants to create a GNOME mobile shell for Linux smartphones (and other Librem 5 phone update)

    Linux computer maker Purism hopes to ship their smartphone in January, and the corporation has been providing updates about development of the upcoming Librem 5 smartphone periodically since launching a crowdfunding campaign last September (that campaign eventually raised more than $1.5 million through pre-orders).

    We know that the phone will feature an NXP i.MX8 processor, that it will ship with a custom version of Purism’s PureOS operating system, and that it will support several different user interfaces and operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, KDE Plasma Mobile, and Purism’s own GNOME-based user interface.

  • Fractal Hackfest, Strasbourg (day 1

    Yesterday was the first day in the first Fractal Hackfest. I'll try to write an small blog post every day to share the development with the world.

    My travel to Strasbourg was not an easy travel because I've to take two flights to get here from Málaga so a long day travelling.

    I met with Mathew from Matrix.org at the London airport because we took the same flight to here and it was really cool to meet him in person and we talk a little about the current Matrix situation.

    I've met the other Fractal people and collaborators at the event, and it's great that people from Purism, Matrix, Gnome and the two GSoC students come here to work together in this great application.

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GNU: LibreJS 7.14, Hiring, and GNU Guix

Sat, 2018-05-12 05:33
  • LibreJS 7.14 released

    GNU LibreJS aims to address the JavaScript problem described in Richard Stallman's article The JavaScript Trap. LibreJS is a free add-on for GNU IceCat and other Mozilla-based browsers. It blocks nonfree nontrivial JavaScript while allowing JavaScript that is free and/or trivial.

  • Contract opportunity: JavaScript Developer for GNU LibreJS

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF), a Massachusetts 501(c)(3) charity with a worldwide mission to protect computer user freedom, seeks a contract JavaScript Developer to work on GNU LibreJS, a free browser add-on that addresses the problem of nonfree JavaScript described in Richard Stallman's article The JavaScript Trap. This is a temporary, paid contract opportunity, with specific deliverables, hours, term, and payment to be determined with the selected candidate. We anticipate the contract being approximately 80 hours of full-time work, with the possibility of extension depending on results and project status.

  • Paper on reproducible bioinformatics pipelines with Guix

    I’m happy to announce that the bioinformatics group at the Max Delbrück Center that I’m working with has released a preprint of a paper on reproducibility with the title Reproducible genomics analysis pipelines with GNU Guix.

    We built a collection of bioinformatics pipelines called "PiGx" ("Pipelines in Genomix") and packaged them as first-class packages with GNU Guix. Then we looked at the degree to which the software achieves bit-reproducibility, analysed sources of non-determinism (e.g. time stamps), discussed experimental reproducibility at runtime (e.g. random number generators, the interface provided by the kernel and the GNU C library, etc) and commented on the practice of using “containers” (or application bundles) instead.

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