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GNOME and Other Software

Mon, 2017-07-24 03:57
  • Dash to Panel – A Cool Icon Taskbar for the GNOME Shell

    Dash to Panel is a customizable open source extension for the GNOME Shell that moves the dash into GNOME’s main panel; combining app launchers and the system tray into one panel like that of KDE Plasma and Windows 7+.

  • GNOME's Mutter Window Manager Now Supports Tablet Wheel Events on Wayland

    The Mutter composite and window manager of the widely-used GNOME desktop environment was updated recently both on the stable and devel channels with a bunch of new features and improvements.

    Mutter 3.24.4 is now the latest stable build of the application, and it's here to add a few important changes for tablets, including improved stability of tablet plugs and unplugs, working window moving and resizing via tablet tools, as well as the implementation of tablet rings/strips configuration.

    In addition, Mutter now no longer throttles motion events on tablet tools, it's capable of handling the left-handed mode on pen/eraser devices, and adds support for tablet wheel events when running under the Wayland display server. Talking about Wayland, the Wacom cursor offset should now work as expected in Mutter 3.24.4.

  • Terminus: A Great Modern And Highly Cutomizable Terminal For Linux

    Are you tired of your default terminal or looking for an alternative which can look cool as well as perform operation in your system? If yes, Terminus is for you which is modern terminal designed to be highly customizable, it will let you enjoy CLI. If you are using Linux since there were CRT monitors with Linux then check out Cool-Retro-Term, which is another great looking terminal application.
    Terminus is built using web technologies based on Electron, it is cross-platform modern age terminal available for (Linux, Windows and Mac), on Linux it is a full terminal which can spawn with a global hotkey, tabs persist after restart, Auto-dock to anyside of any screen, full Unicode and double-width character support. On Windows it supports Classic CMD, PowerShell and Bash on Windows. On Mac it just works.
    Multiple app themes and a myriad of community color schemes for the terminal. Color scheme editor included. Install plugins from the NPM repository, or create your own with Typescript and Angular framework.

  • Some Useful Indicators: Ayatana, Clipboard-Autoedit, Diskstat, Files, Bulletin and Udisks

    Panel Indicators always comes in handy when you have to do some productive work on your desktop computer, to access quick functions of different applications these indicators saves you a lot of time, some indicator give you information you want to receive, it all depends on your needs. Today presenting you some useful indicators which may help you and makes your desktop experience much better. Following all the indicators are developed by just one guy and available through his PPA.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

Mon, 2017-07-24 03:40

As we reported the other day, the Debian Project unveiled the first point release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, but no installation or live ISOs were made available to download.

That changes today, July 23, 2017, as the Debian CD team lead by Steve McIntyre has prepared the new installation images of Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" for 64-bit (amd64), 32-bit (i386), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64el), ARM64 (AArch64), ARMhf, Armel, MIPS, MIPS 64-bit Little Endian (mips64el), MIPSEL, and IBM System z (s390x) hardware architectures.

Multi-arch images supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit (i386 and amd64) PCs are also available for download, along with a set of twelve source ISO images. On the other hand, the Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live ISOs come in the usual flavors with the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, MATE, and Cinnamon desktop environments, supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures.

Also: Debian 9.1 GNU/Linux Released With 26 Security Fixes

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4MLinux 23.0 BETA released.

Mon, 2017-07-24 03:38

4MLinux 23.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including a major change in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.25.

Also: 4MLinux 23 Slated for Release in November 2017, to Be Supported Until July 2018

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Review: Calculate Linux 17.6 KDE

Mon, 2017-07-24 03:32

Calculate Linux is a Gentoo-based distribution. The project's slogan is "Easy Linux from the source," which refers to the fact that Calculate is relatively easy to use but still benefits from Gentoo's powerful and flexible source-based Portage package manager.

Calculate recently celebrated its tenth birthday and released Calculate Linux 17.6. The distro comes in four flavours; apart from a desktop and server edition there's Calculate Scratch ("for those who want to build a customized system that works for them") and Calculate Media Center ("for your home multimedia center"). Each version is available for the x86_64 and i686 architectures and uses SysV init rather than systemd. The desktop edition has ISOs for the KDE, Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce desktop environments - GNOME is presumably not available because of its dependency on systemd. I opted for the 64-bit KDE version, which is just over 2GB in size.

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Linux 4.13 RC2

Mon, 2017-07-24 03:27
  • Linux 4.13-rc2

    Things are chugging along, and we actually had a reasonably active rc2.

    Normally rc2 is really small because people are taking a breaher and
    haven't started finding bugs yet, but this time around we have a
    bigger-than-average rc2. We'll just have to see how that translates to
    the rest of the release cycle, but I suspect it's just the normal
    variability in this thing (and because I released -rc1 one day early,
    I guess rc2 was one day longer than usual despite the normal Sunday
    release).

    Changes all over, although the diffstat is dominated by the new
    vboxvideo staging driver. I shouldn't have let it through, but Greg,
    as we all know, is "special". Also, Quod licet Iovi, and all that jazz
    - Greg gets to occasionally break some rules.

    If you just ignore that new staging driver, the remainder is still
    about half driver patches (networking, rdma, scsi, usb). The rest
    looks normal too: architecture updates (x86, sparc, powerpc),
    filesystem (nfs, overlayfs, misc), networking and core kernel. And
    some new bpf testcode.

    Time for some more testing, people. You know the drill.

    Linus

  • Linux 4.13-rc2 Released, A "Reasonably Active" Update

    The second release candidate of the Linux 4.13 kernel is now available for testing.

  • The Kernel Put On Some Weight With Linux 4.13

    Here are some numbers about how much weight the kernel gained during the Linux 4.13 merge window that closed last week.

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Qubes OS 3.2

Sun, 2017-07-23 18:15

All in all, the Qubes OS team did an awesome job on integrating all this things so far. The security of the App VMs is not better than the security of the corresponding Template operating systems. However, if a App VM gets an issue, it does not affect the others. If you plan to do weird things, you can use a disposable VM where all changes gets discarded afterwards. It is very easy for anybody to create App VMs without network for example. And this is something I would like to use ever since I stumbled over Firejail which provides app-specific sandboxing.

In general, the documentation of Cubes OS is awesome. I learned a lot and I had to. Cubes OS is nothing to set-up by aunt Martha. You have to have deeper technical understanding to set-up the system. Afterwards, anyone is able to use it with a short introduction to the basic guidelines.

Of course, I found some usability issues and some bugs here or there. But overall, Cubes OS is a valid option for a security purist or a privacy-aware person.

When Qubes OS meets my personal requirements, it complicates things though. For example the file server/client architecture adds complexity you don't have to maintain within a personal computer.

Accessing USB devices, network printers and so forth is cumbersome as well.

You have to set your priorities.

Will I install it on my notebook or desktop and use it on a daily basis? My notebook would be cool since it is in potential harmful environments such as WiFi networks I don't control. On the other side, I do need USB flash drive access with good usability and need to connect to projectors.

My home server/computer runs 24/7 and could profit from Cubes OS since I got many different things running on this machine. I could separate those domains. Working in offline VMs with applications that don't need network is also a very nice thing to have. The USB flash drive thing is also a big thing here. Restricting to LAN access only would be fine. System crash resulting in an encrypted system that does not boot any more is a no go.

Well, I am not convinced yet. Probably I stick to Debian 9 or I do find the urge to come around the issues and find a Qubes OS setup which serves me well.

Also: [Video] 3 BILLION LINUX USERS!!! (Intro to Endless OS)

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Ryzen Compiler Performance: Clang 4/5 vs. GCC 6/7/8 Benchmarks

Sun, 2017-07-23 15:57

A few days back I posted some fresh AMD Ryzen compiler benchmarks of LLVM Clang now that it has its new Znver1 scheduler model, which helps out the performance of Ryzen on Linux with some of the generated binaries tested. But it was found still that Haswell-tuned binaries are sometimes still faster on Ryzen than the Zen "znver1" tuning itself. For continuing our fresh compiler benchmarks from AMD's new Ryzen platform, here are the latest GCC numbers.

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More Security Leftovers

Sun, 2017-07-23 15:35
  • Fingerprint-based detection of DNS hijacks using RIPE Atlas [Warning for PDF]

    DNS hijacking is a real thing happening on the Internet
    ○ We found several RIPE Atlas probes with hijacked DNS resolver
    ○ Some countries have >25% chances of DNS being hijacked

  • How the Swedish administration leaked EU’s secure STESTA intranet to Russia, then tried glossing over it

    The Swedish administration is leaking its secret intranet and databases to Russia, via its Transport Agency, via the IBM cloud, via IBM's subcontractor NCR (formerly AT&T) in Serbia, which is a close Russian military ally. Giving staff in Serbia administrative access to these networks practically guarantees that Russia also has access to the network. The European Union's secure STESTA network is also connected to the leaked intranet. But this is not about geopolitics and who’s allied with whom, but about how an administration tries to quiet down and gloss over an apocalyptically stupid and monstrously damaging data leak.

  • Outsourcing Nightmare

    We had two reports of an ongoing situation in Sweden where confidential information held by the government has been compromised

  • Status update from the Reproducible Builds project

    Since then, we have made considerable progress which has been reported during DebConf 15 and 16 talks as well as other conferences around the world. However, for the sake of information preservation and clear communication we felt the need to write a newer report here.

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KDE: KDE Slimbook, Akademy, and GSoC

Sun, 2017-07-23 15:30
  • Yesterday I picked up my new KDE Slimbook from the Slimbook.es stand at Akademy.

    First thing I did, of course, was boot it with my FreeBSD 11.0 SD card, to see if it works with my favorite operating system (with Plasma 5 desktop, of course). Nope: 11.0 hangs after finding acpi_ec0, so I will write about that later this week.

    Second thing I did was boot KDE Neon (pre-installed) on it, to see how it works out-of-the-box. I collected a bunch of tiny-little-irritations, papercuts if you will, from the basic installation — which have disappeared after an update and reboot.

  • Akademy 2017 -- Day 1

    During the first day at the Akademy, everything went according to plan and nearly everything was on time. Kudos to the organisers.

    The weather was balmy at the beginning of the day and, although Aleix Pol said it was not hotter than a hot day in Barcelona, many of the Scandinavian and Scottish attendees were visibly wilting under the sun. Fortunately for them, the venue is equipped with air-conditioning.

    Little known fact about Almería: it is situated in the biggest desert in Europe, the Desert of Tabernas. A better known fact is that that same desert has been used as a location for many spaghetti westerns, including the seminal Sergio Leone movies "For A Fistful of Dollars" and "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly". What is more interesting for some KDE members is that Tabernas has also been used in the filming of at least one Doctor Who episode ("A Town Called Mercy"). Unsurprisingly, the whovians amongst us quickly got busy and organised a trip to the place of the shoot for later in the week.

  • Akademy-es 2017 Fue Muy Bien

    On the 20th and 21st of July, KDE España held, with the invaluable help of UNIA, HackLab Almería and the University of Almería, and with the sponsorship of Opentia, its 12th annual gathering: Akademy-es 2017.

    As it always happens when Akademy takes place in Spain, Akademy-es 2017 became a prelude of the international event and many well-known KDE developers attended.

    Throughout two days, talks were offered covering many different topics, including Plasma, programming (C++, Qt, mobile), exciting projects like Kirigami, proposals for the future such as KDE on automobile, encouragement to use KDE software and contribute to KDE, and information about KDE España.

  • GSoC’17-Week #5

    In Krita, we cannot delete the bundle created just like that. The Bundles created are saved as the KisResource in a QList. We have to remove it from that list, then obviously, we have to remove it from the list widget where this bundle is shown. Then we have to BlackList the file. Then from there, we can remove the blacklisted bundles as we empty a recycle bin .

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Leftovers: Software from the Source, Electron, Debian, Wine, and KDE

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:54
  • Software from the Source

    In this article, I am outlining an idea for an improved process of deploying software to Linux systems. It combined advantages of traditional, package mangement based systems with containerized software through systems such as Flatpak, Snap, or AppImage. An improved process allows us to make software deployment more efficient across the whole Free software community, have better supported software on users systems and allow for better quality at the same time.

  • Kernel 4.13 RC1 Has Been Released

    The final version of Kernel 4.13 RC1 has been finally released, bringing various changes and tweaks.

  • A look at I-Nex – a CPU-Z like Application for GNU/Linux

    When I was running Windows one of the first pieces of software I'd install after I'd grabbed all my necessities, was CPU-Z.

    It was useful for looking at temperatures, specs, generating reports, and just overall gathering of information. In GNU/Linux we can do all of this via the terminal, but not everyone likes to use consoles, and some may not even know how to. Thankfully, I-Nex exists, and it serves many of the same purposes.

  • Seriously Folks, Electron Apps Aren’t That Bad…

    Do you like Electron apps? Chances are you don't. In this post I list reasons why I don't think Electron apps are bad, and why haters should chill.

  • I'm going to DebCamp17, Montréal, Canada
  • Improving bulk performance in debhelper

    Since debhelper/10.3, there has been a number of performance related changes. The vast majority primarily improves bulk performance or only have visible effects at larger “input” sizes.

  • Wine 2.13 Has Improvements for Grand Theft Auto V, The Witcher 3, and Eve Online

    The Wine development team announced the release and immediate availability for download of the Wine 2.13 development release, which brings some new features and improves support for various Windows apps and games.

    Coming only one day after the Wine 2.0.2 stable release, which only brought a bunch of bug fixes, the Wine 2.13 development release is here to introduce support for Unicode 10.0.0, revamp the default mouse cursors, improve anti-aliasing in DirectWrite, and add Message Framing protocol support in WebServices.

  • KDE Ships Beta of KDE Applications 17.08

    Today KDE released the beta of the new versions of KDE Applications. With dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing.

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OSS: ProtonMail, Scality, and Open Access

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:50
  • ProtonMail reassures us that its Android app will be open sourced

    It looks as though the secure email provider, ProtonMail, will open source its Android app in the future at least according to their Twitter account. Reaching out to ProtonMail, we asked whether they would open source their Android app and even work with the maintainers of F-Droid to get the client on the FOSS app store.

  • Scality Launches Zenko, Open Source Software To Assure Data Control In A Multi-Cloud World

    Scality, a leader in object and cloud storage, announced the open source launch of its Scality Zenko, a Multi-Cloud Data Controller. The new solution is free to use and embed into developer applications, opening a new world of multi-cloud storage for developers.

  • Campus launches new research support website

    The campus library launched a new website July 13 which compiles resources for campus researchers.

    The website includes resources on affordable course content, copyright laws and open access publishing, among others.

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Openwashing: Lyft, Microsoft Fluff, and "Microsoft Loves Linux" Bait

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:48

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Hardware: HealthyPi and 3-D Printing

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:45

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Programming Languages Ladder, Benchmarks of PHP

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:44
  • Q. What's today's top language? A. Python... no, wait, Java... no, C

    Among developers, Python is the most popular programming language, followed by C, Java, C++, and JavaScript; among employers, Java is the most sought after, followed by C, Python, C++, and JavaScript.

    Or so says the 2017 IEEE Spectrum ranking, published this week.

    IEEE Spectrum, a publication of the The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a technical advocacy organization, says it evaluated 12 metrics from 10 sources to arrive at this conclusion.

  • Benchmarks Of PHP 7.2 Beta: PHP Is Still Getting Faster

    PHP 7.2 Beta 1 was released yesterday as the next step towards this next refinement to PHP7 that is expected to be officially released in November. I couldn't help but to run some initial benchmarks.

    PHP 7.2 Beta 1 presents the Sodium extension for modern and easy-to-use cryptography, opcache improvements, better JSON decoding of invalid UTF-8 data, and many bug fixes among other improvements since PHP 7.1. The latest release and more details can be found via PHP.net.

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Red Hat and Fedora: Financial News, DNF, Fedora 27 Features, and Fedora Parties

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:41
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) PT Lowered to $96.00 at Mizuho
  • Tale of the Ticker: Red Hat Inc (RHT) Moves on Volume
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Stake Reduced by Gagnon Advisors LLC
  • Trading Options: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) : A Clever Covered Call
  • What Is DNF Package Manager And How To Use It

    A package file is an archive which contains the binaries and other resources that make software and the pre and post installation scripts. They also provide the information regarding dependencies and other packages required for the installation and running of the software.
     In the Linux world, there are two main types of packaging formats, .deb for those in the Debian and Ubuntu world and the .rpm for the Fedora, RHEL and CentOS. These formats also have their own tools for package management. The .debs use apt or aptitude and dpkg while the .rpms have been using YUM, at least until recently. Fedora recently replaced YUM with their new package manager, DNF. Yup, they built from the ground up a new package manager, the Dandified YUM (DNF), to replace it. ​

  • Fedora 27 Approves More Features: Flatpaks, NSS, RPM 4.14, Installer

    At Friday's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) there were yet more features approved for the current Fedora Linux development cycle.

  • The little bit different Fedora 26 Release Party – Part 1

    Since Fedora 21 we had not really a Fedora Release Party here in Phnom Penh, Fedora 21 we did at Development Innovations which was wonderful supported by Greta Greathouse the head of this US AID driven institution. But well in Asia an not to mention non-foss oriented company showed a behavior like in Europe 25 years ago. So DI has a new boss, which is lesser FOSS oriented. So we had to find a new place. For Fedora 24 the time frame was to short for me to organize something and Fedora 25 was an epic fail on the Royal University Phnom Penh, which cancelled the party, an hour before it.

    So this time I going with Passerelles Numerique as partner, which will not just provide the room and helps eqipement and this is what makes this Release Party a bit different from the “normal” ones.

  • What is happening in Fedora?

    The last week we had a Fedora Activity Day for LATAM Ambassadors, it was in Cusco – Perú, so, why was celebrated this event?

    I can tell you why in some words, new Fedora people (people, not fedorapeople.org) don’t know  how to do things inside the community, how to collaborate, how to request sponsorship, how to be aware when spending Fedora resources… etc, and… the old people are busy now and can’t spend much time in Fedora.

    It was an Alex Oviedo’s (alexove) initiative and we had six representatives for LATAM countries x3mboy from Chile, asoliard from Argentina, josereyesjdi from Panama, itamarjp from Brazil, searchsam from Nicaragua, me (tonet666p) from Perú and bexelbie from Czech Republic (yes, is not LATAM but he was helping us).

  • FAD Latam 2017: x3mboy’s Event report

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Security Leftovers

Sun, 2017-07-23 08:35
  • Putin’s Hackers {sic} Now Under Attack—From Microsoft

     

    Since August, Microsoft has used the lawsuit to wrest control of 70 different command-and-control points from Fancy Bear. The company’s approach is indirect, but effective. Rather than getting physical custody of the servers, which Fancy Bear rents from data centers around the world, Microsoft has been taking over the Internet domain names that route to them. These are addresses like “livemicrosoft[.]net” or “rsshotmail[.]com” that Fancy Bear registers under aliases for about $10 each.  Once under Microsoft’s control, the domains get redirected from Russia’s servers to the company’s, cutting off the hackers {sic} from their victims, and giving Microsoft a omniscient view of that servers’ network of automated spies.

  • NHS Trusts are spending £158,000 a day on new PCs

     

    NHS TRUSTS are splashing £158,000 per day on new PCs and laptops at an average cost of £678 per device, a Freedom of Information (FoI) request has revealed.

  • Twistlock 2.1 Container Security Suite Released

    Twistlock announced the general availability of version 2.1 of their container security product. Highlights of the release include an integrated firewall that understands application traffic, vulnerability detection, secrets management via integration with third party tools, and compliance alerting and enforcement.

  • Security and privacy are the same thing

    It got me thinking about security and privacy. There's not really a difference between the two. They are two faces of the same coin but why isn't always obvious in today's information universe. If a site like Facebook or Google knows everything about you it doesn't mean you don't care about privacy, it means you're putting your trust in those sites. The same sort of trust that makes passwords private.

    The first thing we need to grasp is what I'm going to call a trust boundary. I trust you understand trust already (har har har). But a trust boundary is less obvious sometimes. A security (or privacy) incident happens when there is a breach of the trust boundary. Let's just dive into some examples to better understand this.

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