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Updated: 19 min 7 sec ago

Ubuntu Boot Times From Linux 4.6 To 4.15 Kernels

Tue, 2017-11-21 15:26

It's been a while since last doing any Linux boot speed comparisons while this morning I have some numbers to share when looking at the boot performance from the Linux 4.6 kernel through Linux 4.15 Git to see how it's changed over time,

These tests were being done using a Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon notebook using a mature Intel Broadwell CPU. Linux 4.6 through 4.15 Git was chosen since that's as far back as the mainline kernel would work with this Ubuntu 17.10 user-space. Linux 4.5 and older would fail to boot.

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Games: Humble Store, LWJGL, Beamdog, GOG and Retro

Tue, 2017-11-21 15:08

Security: MuddyWater, DJI, Updates, Reproducible Builds and Excel

Tue, 2017-11-21 15:06

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7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

Tue, 2017-11-21 13:34

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26.

BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include:

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Why the open source community needs a diverse supply chain

Tue, 2017-11-21 13:32

Diversity and inclusivity in the technology industry—and in open source communities more specifically—have received a lot of coverage, both on Opensource.com and elsewhere. One approach to the issue foregrounds arguments about concepts that are more abstract—like human decency, for example.

But the "supply chain" metaphor works, too. And it can be an effective argument for championing greater inclusivity in our open organizations, especially when people dismiss arguments based on appeals to abstract concepts. Open organizations require inclusivity, which is a necessary input to get the diversity that reduces the risk in our supply chain.

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Red Hat: Kerala, Amazon and More

Tue, 2017-11-21 12:25

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Programming: Swift, Brilliant Jerks in Engineering, and Career Path for Software Developers

Tue, 2017-11-21 12:21
  • Swift code will run on Google's Fuchsia OS

    A few days ago, there was a flash-in-the-pan controversy over Google "forking" Apple's open-source programming language Swift. After a few minutes of speculation over whether Google was going to make its own special flavor of the language for its own purposes, Swift's creator Chris Lattner (who now works at Google) helpfully clarified the situation:

  • Brilliant Jerks in Engineering

    This are numerous articles and opinions on the topic, including Brilliant Jerks Cost More Than They Are Worth, and It's Better to Avoid a Toxic Employee than Hire a Superstar. My colleague Justin Becker is also giving a talk at QConSF 2017 on the topic: Am I a Brilliant Jerk?.

    It may help to clarify that "brilliant jerk" can mean different things to different people. To illustrate, I'll describe two types of brilliant jerks: the selfless and the selfish, and their behavior in detail. I'll then describe the damage caused by these jerks, and ways to deal with them.

    The following are fictional characters. These are not two actual engineers, but are collections of related traits to help examine this behavior beyond the simple "no asshole rule." These are engineers who by default act like jerks, not engineers who sometimes act that way.

  • [Older] The missing career path for software developers

    You started hacking on technology thrilled with every stroke of the key, making discoveries with every commit. You went about solving problems, finding new challenges. You were happy for a while, until you hit a plateau. There was a choice to be made. Continue solving the same problems or start managing others. You tried it out, and hated it. Longing to focus on technology, not people, you turned to your open source project. When it became successful, you became an open source maintainer but ended up overwhelmed and burned out. Hoping to get back to doing work that fascinates you, you went work for yourself. Lacking experience running a business, you're crushed with all the decisions you need to make. You’re nearing burnout — again. It feels like you’re on a hamster wheel.

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Mastodon is Free Software, But It Does Not Respect Free Speech

Tue, 2017-11-21 09:37

Mastodon was always known to be tough on Nazis; it was known that they were strict on free speech only to a degree. After the treatment that I received yesterday, however, I can no longer recommend Mastodon. It may be Free software, but it’s very weak on free speech.

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Mesa 17.3 RC5 and Early Stages of Linux 4.15

Tue, 2017-11-21 08:35
  • mesa 17.3.0-rc5

    The fifth release candidate for Mesa 17.3.0 is now available. This is the last planned release candidate before the final release.

    We still have a couple of regressions in our tracker [1] although I'm anticipating for those to be resolved by EOW.

  • Mesa 17.3-RC5 Released, Official Mesa 3D Update Expected By Next Week

    The Mesa 17.3 release game is in overtime but it should be wrapping up in the days ahead.

    Emil Velikov of Collabora announced the Mesa 17.3-RC5 release candidate this morning. He anticipates it being the last release candidate, but there still are a few blocker bugs open. As of writing there still are 4 bugs open with one pertaining to Gallium3D Softpipe and the others being Intel driver issues.

  • Extra KVM Changes For Linux 4.15 Bring UMIP Support, AMD SEV Changes Delayed

    As some additional work past the KVM changes for Linux 4.15 submitted last week, a few more feature items have been queued.

    The second batch of Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) updates sent in today for Linux 4.15 include ARM GICv4 support, x86 bug fixes, the AMD VFIO NFT performance fix, and x86 guest UMIP support. Landing already with Linux 4.15 is Intel UMIP capabilities for User-Mode Instruction Prevention to prevent certain instructions from being executed if the ring level is greater than zero. This latest KVM pull update adds this UMIP support to its space for both real and emulated guests.

  • AMD EPYC Is Running Well On Linux 4.15

    Of the many changes coming for Linux 4.15, as detailed this weekend Radeon GPU and AMD CPU customers have a lot to be thankful for with this new kernel update currently in development. Here are some initial benchmarks of the Linux 4.15 development kernel using an AMD EPYC 7601 32-core / 64-thread setup.

    When it comes to EPYC in Linux 4.15, the kernel side-bits have landed for Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV), CPU temperature monitoring support now working, and improved NUMA node balancing.

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Videos: Akademy 2017 Talk, Upgrading Linux Mint, This Week in Linux

Tue, 2017-11-21 08:32
  • Akademy 2017 talk

    The talk by Jean-Baptiste Mardelle’s at Akademy 2017 is released along with many other interesting talks.

    Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community.

  • How To In-place Upgrade Linux Mint

    This video shows how to upgrade Linux Mint from 17.3 to 18.3 while keeping all of your personal data intact.

    Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14, Firefox Quantum, Fedora 27, Munich? Meh | This Week in Linux 14

    On this episode of This Week in Linux. The first 6 Year LTS Linux Kernel was released this week. Huge Update from Mozilla with Firefox Quantum. New distro releases from Fedora and Slax.

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LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

Tue, 2017-11-21 08:27

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend.

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Microsoft Worker Leaves for Google, Criticizes Post-Windows Vista Dev Strategy

Tue, 2017-11-21 08:01

Microsoft employee Tim Sneath, who spent no less than 17 years with the company, announced in a blog post that he’s leaving the software giant to work for Google on the new Flutter mobile framework.

Sneath started his post by emphasizing how great Microsoft is, explaining that he company has “incredibly diverse interests” and is “filled with talented people.”

Despite the good parts, however, the former Microsoft Program Manager who worked on a series of projects for developers, discussed what he described as the “missteps” that the Redmond-based software giant embraced beginning with the Windows Vista era.

Also: ‘Goodbye Microsoft, hello Linux’

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LiFT Scholarship Recipients Advance Open Source Around the World

Tue, 2017-11-21 04:36

Fifteen people from 13 different countries have received Linux Foundation Training Scholarships (LiFT) in the category of Linux Newbies. This year, 27 people received scholarships across all categories — the most ever awarded by the Foundation.

Now in its seventh year, the program awards training scholarships to current and aspiring IT professionals worldwide who may not otherwise have the means for specialized training. The Foundation has awarded 75 scholarships worth more than $168,000 since the program began.

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Linux Containers vs Virtual Machines

Tue, 2017-11-21 04:29

Ever since containers on Linux became popular, determining the difference between Linux containers and virtual machines has become trickier. This article will provide you with the details to understand the differences between Linux containers and virtual machines.

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Linux gizmo indexes photos and videos for visual recognition search

Tue, 2017-11-21 04:01

Pimloc’s “Pholio” runs Linux on an Nvidia Tegra, and provides offline storage and search of images and video using visual and face recognition.

Digital imaging has lived up to its promise of making it easier to take more images more quickly, but the promise that it would make it easier to find those images has fallen short. Unless you spend time with an image management package and apply tags to each and every photo, it’s a pain to try to find specific images or groups of images. A new Kickstarter project called Pholio promises to skip the prep work and use visual recognition technology to quickly locate any image or video you seek.

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today's leftovers

Mon, 2017-11-20 22:15
  • Why Linus is right (as usual)

    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable.

    This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs.
    The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.

  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes

    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies.

    One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

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Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

Mon, 2017-11-20 22:13
  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting

    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download.

    VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon.
    Why Vidcutter?

    If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily.

    VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More

    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases.

    The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.

  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows

    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux.

    It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.

  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements

    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes.

    MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

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