TuxMachines

Subscribe to TuxMachines feed
Your source for Linux and Open Source news, reviews, and howtos.
Updated: 44 min 52 sec ago

Fedora Leftovers

Mon, 2018-04-09 18:16

read more

Debian and Ubuntu: debhelper, Ubuntu on USB, Test Weeks, Free Culture Showcase

Mon, 2018-04-09 18:14
  • Build system changes in debhelper

    Since debhelper/11.2.1[1], we now support using cmake for configure and ninja for build + test as an alternative to cmake for configure and make for build + test. This change was proposed by Kyle Edwards in Debian bug #895044. You can try this new combination by specifying “cmake+ninja” as build system.

  • Run Ubuntu 18.04 From USB Stick

    Ubuntu 18.04 is a great operating system. It is in beta at the time of this writing. Everyone is so excited and eagerly waiting for its release even as we speak. If you’re one of them, you may wish to carry your favorite Linux distribution with you all the time. Have you ever thought about running Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick? Well it is possible. You can run Ubuntu 18.04 from a USB stick. That way your workstation is with you wherever you go. You don’t have to use other people’s setup, you can use your own comfortable setup, also your favorite softwares.

  • Ubuntu Developer Floats The Idea Of "Test Weeks" To Replace Early Alpha/Beta Releases

    Prominent Ubuntu community developer Simon Quigley has sparked a discussion about Ubuntu's release milestones and the possibility of moving away with their alpha and beta one milestones moving forward.

    Quigley's proposal after consulting with the Xubuntu / Ubuntu MATE / Kubuntu / Ubuntu Budgie teams was using "testing weeks" to replace the previous formal alpha / beta releases. During testing weeks, users would be encouraged to use the latest daily ISOs rather than a blessed "alpha" or "beta" image.

  • Announcing the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Free Culture Showcase winners

    In just under 3 weeks, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS launches. This exciting new release is a new Long Term Support release and will introduce many Ubuntu users to GNOME Shell and a closer upstream experience. In addition, Ubuntu developers have been working long and hard to ensure that 18.04 is a big, brilliant release that builds a bridge from 16.04 LTS to a better, bigger platform that can be built upon, without becoming unnecessarily boisterous.

  •  

read more

OSS Leftovers

Mon, 2018-04-09 18:06
  • From MPEG to open source: will telcos get the video codec they need?

    As the NAB broadcast show gets into full swing in Las Vegas, expect to hear plenty of news about the continued convergence of telecoms and broadcast (the longest engagement of all time, with still no marriage date set…) in terms of back-end IP production pipelines, online delivery and mobile consumption. One of the more interesting announcements pre-show concerned the development of online video players.

    For many years, we have been using the tried and tested MPEG standards for online video delivery. Yes, it works, but at a price. For a start, the codec is subject to IPR royalty payments, plus it has arguably not evolved rapidly enough to support the new needs of the telecoms industry – with video consumption showing no sign of slowing down, telcos need a far more efficient pipeline.

  • Top 5 open-source frameworks for AI development

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) are the two terms that are trending these days and sometimes even used interchangeably. However, both the terms are not the same. While AI involves machines that can perform tasks that are characteristic of human intelligence, ML enables modern computers to learn without being explicitly programmed. Basically, ML has evolved from AI via pattern recognition and computational learning theory.

  • Vendor Lock-in: Now in the Cloud!

    Vendor lock-in has moved from corporate infrastructure into the cloud, only this time many are all too happy to embrace it.

    I started my professional career as a general-purpose "computer guy" for a small office. I wore many hats in this job including desktop help desk, server administrator, webmaster, network administrator, security engineer, and in general, if it plugged in, I was probably responsible for it. This was back in the era where, although Linux was making some inroads in the web server market, Microsoft absolutely dominated both the desktop and the corporate server markets. It was expected back then that offices of any size from ten to a thousand people would not only be running Windows on the desktop, but also that the back office would be running Windows servers.

    Those Microsoft services weren't necessarily better than the alternatives, but they won out anyway because of vendor lock-in. The domination of the desktop market meant that Microsoft could develop proprietary protocols like SMB (file sharing) and MAPI (email client syncing), and add them to Windows and Microsoft Office. Once SMB was baked in to Windows, it became easy for the boss of a small office to turn his or her desktop into the office file server without adding any extra software. As the company grew, that desktop was replaced by a standalone Windows server, and when you found out that your ISP (which you were using for corporate email up to this point) didn't support the shared calendar feature you saw in Outlook, you found out that Exchange and its MAPI protocol did.

read more

Nomad Desktop – An Open Source Desktop With a Fresh Experience

Mon, 2018-04-09 17:54

If you’re a Linux fan with the desire to check it its vast customization options then you must have toyed diverse desktop environments and settings including Gnome, Xfce, Unity, Cinnamon, and Plasma, to mention a few.

Today, we have yet another intriguing desktop that I think you will definitely enjoy and it goes by the name of Nomad Desktop.

Nomad Desktop is the face of one of the latest distros on the block, Nitrux, and it aims to provide users with simplicity and the same experience Plasma offers without compromising its flexibility and power for professionals.

read more

Best Linux Distributions: Find One That's Right for You

Mon, 2018-04-09 17:29

The landscape of Linux is vast and varied. And, if you’re considering migrating to the open source platform or just thinking about trying a new distribution, you’ll find a world of possibilities.

Luckily, Jack Wallen has reviewed many different Linux distributions over the years in order to make your life easier. Recently, he has compiled several lists of distributions to consider based on your starting point. If you’re brand-new to Linux, for example, check out his list of distributions that work right out of the box -- no muss, no fuss.

Jack also has lists of the best distros for developers, distros that won’t break the back of your old hardware, specialized distros for scientific and medical fields, and more. Check out Jack’s picks and see if one of these distributions is right for you.

read more

Security Leftovers

Mon, 2018-04-09 17:28
  • The dots do matter: how to scam a Gmail user

    And even in the rare case that a Gmail user is aware of their infinite set of addresses, and they’re aware of the phishing attacks that this can expose them to, this user is unlikely to pick up on it, because the user interfaces of Gmail and Inbox don’t hint anything about a possible scam. In fact it barely even acknowledges that the email was to a non-standard address. The only clue in the screenshot above is that the interface says “to james.hfisher”, instead of “to me”.

  • Episode 91 - Security lessons from a 7 year old

    Josh and Kurt talk to a 7 year old about security. We cover Minecraft security, passwords, hacking, and many many other nuggets of wisdom.

  • Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS patches security vulnerabilities

    Canonical has released a kernel update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

    The “important update” patches 39 security vulnerabilities, according to a report by Softpedia.

    The update covers Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and its official derivatives, including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, and Xubuntu.

    Security fixes contained in the update cover a wide range of issues, such as vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel’s USB over IP implementation – which allowed remote attacks.

read more

Games: Valve and ‘Rise of the Tomb Raider'

Mon, 2018-04-09 17:15
  • Valve Soothes SteamOS Fans After Yanking Steam Machines

    Valve has been working to reassure members of its community that it has not yet thrown in the towel on SteamOS and Linux gaming systems that have been hampered over the years due to performance issues, soaring sales on mainstream rival platforms, and generally weak demand for Steam Machines.

    Valve recently withdrew SteamOS machines from its direct online sales portal, saying it was working to reconfigure the platform.

    That move did not go unnoticed by the Steam for Linux community, which prompted developer Pierre-Loup Griffais to offer reassurances in an online post last week.

  • ‘Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration’ Will Hit Linux This Month

    The ‘Rise of the Tomb Raider’ Linux release will arrive this month.

    Games porting company Feral Interactive announced that Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration was Linux bound back in February, though the exact release date was unknown.

    Now, in a tweet posted on its official account Feral says: “Lara Croft is returning to Linux in Rise of the Tomb Raider later this month, shortly after macOS”.

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider will release for Linux this month

    This will be the twenty first Linux port from Feral (counting the Dawn of War II and Shogun 2 - Fall of the Samurai standalones together with the main games), although they are also bringing Life is Strange: Before the Storm and Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia to Linux so there's more to look forward to this year.

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider Coming To Linux This Month

    Feral Interactive has just confirmed that Rise of the Tomb Raider for Linux will be released this month.

    We have known that Rise of the Tomb Raider is coming for Linux "this Spring" while Feral has just confirmed on Reddit that the release is happening this month. The macOS release is already to happen this week.

read more

Graphics: RADV, vGPU, Libinput, Etnaviv

Mon, 2018-04-09 17:03
  • VK_AMD_shader_core_properties Now Supported By RADV

    Thanks to Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's Linux driver team, the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver supports the new VK_AMD_shader_core_properties extension.

    A few days back Vulkan 1.1.72 was released and one of three new extensions was VK_AMD_shader_core_properties. This AMD shader core properties extension to Vulkan exposes physical device characteristics like the number of shader engines, SIMDs per compute unit, threads per wavefront, and other shader related hardware details.

  • Making Use Of Intel vGPU Support On Linux 4.16 & QEMU 2.12

    As of the Linux 4.16 kernel that was released one week ago, the kernel-side bits are in place for Intel Virtual GPU support and in user-space the upcoming QEMU 2.12 has the necessary code for the GTK and SPICE code-paths.

  • Libinput 1.10.4 Makes Touchpads A Bit Snappier

    Libinput 1.10.14 is now available and while it's just a point release, there is at least one change sure to catch your attention.

  • Etnaviv Performance Counter Support Merged Into Mesa 18.1

    Landing in Linux 4.15 was performance counters support in the Etnaviv DRM driver as the low-level bits for exposing the hardware counters with this reverse-engineered, open-source Vivante graphics driver. The user-space/Mesa side code has now landed too.

    With Mesa 18.1 paired with Linux 4.15 or newer will now be support for exposing the hardware performance counters for seeing more characteristics about the GPU's performance in working to optimize your game/application or the driver itself for efficient usage on Vivante GC hardware.

read more

Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta From Ubuntu 17.10

Mon, 2018-04-09 14:32

This step-by-step tutorial demonstrates how to upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta from Ubuntu 17.10.

read more

Albanian Open Source Conference OSCAL’18 is Now Open For Registration

Mon, 2018-04-09 14:30

Albania’s premier open source event OSCAL will be held on19-20 May 2018 in Tirana. Registration for the event is now open.

read more

The current state of Linux video editing 2018

Mon, 2018-04-09 09:38

It's pretty well known that Linux is a big deal in modern movie making. Linux is the standard base, a literal industry standard for digital effects but, like all technology with momentum, it seems that the process of cutting footage still defaults mostly to a non-Linux platform. Slowly, however, as artists seek to simplify and consolidate the post-production pipeline, Linux video editing is gaining in popularity.

read more

Review: Sortix 1.0

Mon, 2018-04-09 06:35

Sortix is a relatively new project, less than a third the age of Linux, and appears to be mostly a one-person development project. To me, this makes the progress made so far amazing. The system has a working installer and partition manager, it works with multiple file systems, has a working collection of ported GNU tools and can run graphical games. It's quite a feat of coding to get all of this working in so short a time. What really impressed me though was that the operating system's documentation (exploring what it does, what it does not yet do and how the pieces work) is clear and up to date. In that regard a lot of other open source projects could follow Sortix's example.

Unfortunately, at this time, Sortix is not a practical operating system for most scenarios. We can test it, develop code on the platform and learn from its design, but Sortix lacks networking, multi-user security and a working desktop environment. This makes the project more of a developer playground than a system for end users to run. Still, in the realm of a personal hobby project, Sortix is one of the coolest creations I have seen in a while.

read more

Security: Switches, Cisco, FUD, Beep, Android

Mon, 2018-04-09 06:15

read more

​How many Linux users are there anyway?

Mon, 2018-04-09 06:12

Perhaps the most unbiased numbers are from the federal government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP). DAP's numbers come from the billion visits over the past 90 days to over 400 US executive branch government domains. That's about 5,000 total websites. These visitors appear to be largely US citizens. You can see this from the most popular websites: The US Postal Service, the IRS, and Medline Plus.

By DAP's count, Linux is bundled in with 0.6 percent other. Chrome OS, according to DAP, has more users: 1.3 percent.

Still, while desktop Linux is a minority desktop operating system, it still has millions of users, and that's a lot more than a mere fraction of 1 percent.

And, when it comes to overall end-user operating system, Linux-based Android has 70.96 percent of the mobile market by NetMarketShare's count. By DAP's reckoning, Android has 19.9 percent of all end-user systems, while StatCounter shows Android as even more popular than Windows by 39.49 percent to 36.62 percent.

read more

Pages