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Updated: 27 min 12 sec ago

Security: RoboCyberWall, Updates, Dnsmasq, SEC, and Yahoo!

Thu, 2017-10-05 05:09
  • RoboCyberWall Aims to Block Linux Server Hacks [Ed: ad disguised as an article]
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Google Patches Open-Source Flaw, Requires TLD Encryption

    Google has made a couple of notable moves on the security front this week: One, it has patched flaws in a DNS software package known as Dnsmasq; and two, it said it would start requiring encryption for 45 top-level domains (TLDs) that it controls as a registrar.

    Dnsmasq, an open-source package, is widely installed in desktop Linux distributions (like Ubuntu), home routers and IoT devices, and provides functionality for serving DNS, DHCP, router advertisements and network boot. Google discovered seven distinct issues within the kit: three potential remote code executions, one information leak, and three denial of service vulnerabilities affecting the latest version at the project git server as of September 5.

  • SEC hack came as internal security team begged for funding

    Last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed a 2016 breach of a test system that allowed an unknown party to get access to unpublished corporate information in the SEC's Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval (EDGAR) system. The breach potentially allowed the bad actors to profit from trades based on the information. SEC Chairman Jay Clayton revealed the extent of that breach in a policy statement on the importance of the commission's cyber-security mission. But just a few months before the SEC discovered the initial breach last year, as Reuters reports, members of the SEC's own internal digital forensics and security team wrote a letter bemoaning the lack of support they received from the agency's Office of Information Technology and SEC leadership.

  • Hacks Are Always Worse Than Reported: All Of Yahoo Email Was Hacked In 2013. All. Of. It.

    Given recent and massive stories about data security breaches by some very, very large players in the technology and financial spaces, we have developed a mantra that you should have on repeat in your head any time you read stories about a breach: however big the breach is reported to be initially, it's always bigger. We formulated that 12 years ago and it has continually held true. We saw it with Equifax. We saw it with Deloitte. And you will also likely recall that 2013 and 2014 were not banner years for data security at a little company called Yahoo. Hacks of Yahoo's email platform were reported initially to be in the hundreds of thousands in terms of the number of accounts compromised. As Verizon began negotiating the purchase of Yahoo, that number crept into the hundreds of millions. Eventually, Yahoo settled on a billion compromised accounts resulting from the hacks.

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