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Updated: 58 min 30 sec ago

Kernel and Drivers

Tue, 2017-03-14 02:09
  • Kernel 4.10 gives Linux support for AMD Ryzen multithreading

    With the release of its Ryzen 7 series CPUs, AMD came out swinging at Intel’s high-end Core i7 line. As I noted in a previous column, version 4.10 of the Linux kernel corrects an issue that kept Intel CPUs from reaching their turbo speeds, but there’s also something in the new kernel for Team Red.

  • Linus Torvalds explains how to Pull without jerking his chain

    Linux kernel developers have again given Linus Torvalds cause for complaint.

    The Linux Lord felt the need to take to the Linux Kernel Mailing List late last week to tell a chap called Wolfram Sang that “If you cannot explain a reason for a merge or be bothered to try to write a commit message, you shouldn't be doing that merge. It really is that simple.”

  • Microsoft admits mistake, pulls problematic Windows 10 driver

    The driver, listed as "Microsoft -- WPD -- 2/22/2016 12:00:00 AM -- 5.2.5326.4762," wasn’t accompanied by any details, although we knew from the name that it related to Windows Portable Devices and affected users who had phones and tablets connected to the OS.

    While the driver was an optional update for Windows 7 and 8.1 users, it was installed automatically for those on Windows 10.

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Events: Open Networking Summit and OpenStack Summit

Tue, 2017-03-14 02:08
  • Opening Up Virtual Reality Development with WebVR

    “Virtual reality (VR) is nothing new — people have been experimenting with it for decades. But only recently, we have come to terms with having commercial hardware like Oculus or HTC Vive to experience and enjoy VR content within our home,” says Rabimba Karanjai, a full-time graduate researcher and Mozilla contributor, who will be speaking about virtual reality development at the upcoming Open Networking Summit.

  • Helping PTG attendees and other developers get to the OpenStack Summit
  • Submitting a Talk To OpenStack Summit

    I haven’t written a post for some time now, been busy creating something very special which i hope to share about really soon. I usually write in this blog about technical things, and i will continue to do this after this post but i wanted to share some of the insights i gained both from being a returning speaker and track chair in the recent OpenStack summits.

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Leftovers: OSS

Tue, 2017-03-14 02:08

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Munich Strikes Back at Microsoft's Dirty Tricks and Lobbying

Tue, 2017-03-14 00:49
  • There's a Munich disagreement over Open source

    Moves by German politicians to undo Munich’s decade experiment in open source are unnecessary, according to the bloke in charge of the project.

    There are moves to replace the Linux based systems at Munich after a decade of it being the poster-child for open sauce operating systems. Munich's ruling SPD-CSU coalition is apparently a fan of phasing out the use of open-source software.

    Last month, the general council backed a proposal that the administration should investigate how long it will take and how much it will cost to build a Windows 10 client. Once it has that information the council will vote to replace LiMux the custom version of Ubuntu which the council has been developing.

  • Munich IT chief slams city's decision to dump Linux for Windows

    THE HEAD OF IT at the City of Munich's IT services provider [email protected], Karl-Heinz Schneider, has claimed that there are no "compelling technical reasons" for the authority to order a migration back to Windows.

    Last month, Munich voted to investigate the viability of creating a Windows 10 client, thus ending its multi-million euro, nine-year experiment in running the municipality on Linux.

    Schneider, who heads up the company responsible for Munich's desktop Linux implementation, has spoken out about the move during an interview with German IT publication Heise.de.

  • Munich's desktop Linux was 'working fine' before politicians decreed return to Windows

    Speaking to German IT publication Heise.de, Schneider claimed that he was surprised by the move, adding that any compatibility problems that the City had initially encountered had been fixed.

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New ISO images for LMDE 2 “Betsy”

Mon, 2017-03-13 23:21

LMDE 2 received many updates in the last 2 years, including many improvements which were ported from Linux Mint as well as all the new versions of MATE, Cinnamon and the Xapps.

Also: Linux Mint Debian Edition Updated (LMDE 2)

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LLVM 4.0.0 Release

Mon, 2017-03-13 23:12
  • LLVM 4.0.0 Release

    It is my pleasure to announce that LLVM 4 is now available.

  • LLVM 4.0 Released

    Hans Wennborg has announced the release of LLVM 4.0 and connected sub-projects like Clang 4.0. LLVM/Clang 4.0 is a big update to this open-source compiler infrastructure stack and also marks the change to their new versioning scheme.

    For release highlights of LLVM/Clang 4.0, see our feature overview for the advancements made to this compiler stack over the past half-year. LLVM 4.0 was supposed to ship back in February but bugs had dragged out the release until today.

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Orion Ubuntu Laptop Review: The Powerful MacBook Pro Alternative

Mon, 2017-03-13 21:50

The choice of a new laptop for many consumers is still seen as the head-to-head comparison of Microsoft’s Windows 10 or Apple’s macOS. The third option of moving to a Linux-powered machine has always been a much trickier prospect. A dizzying range of Linux "flavors" coupled with the mysteries of hardware support stops many adept users from making the switch. What if you had an off-the-shelf approach to Linux hardware that just worked?

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Mirantis shifts again, will offer managed solutions based on open-source technologies

Mon, 2017-03-13 21:44

Mirantis is (or, as we will see, was) known as the pure play OpenStack vendor. The company focused on offering large organizations products and services that helped them leverage the open-source, OpenStack cloud computing platform to build their own clouds for internal or external use.

Over time, however, there has been some doubt cast upon how much of a market opportunity there is for these sort of OpenStack service providers. The OpenStack ecosystem has been the source of much angst as consolidation, rationalization and unrealized hopes and dreams too their toll.

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Minifree Ltd.'s GNU+Linux Computers

Mon, 2017-03-13 21:29

Minifree Ltd.—doing business as "Ministry of Freedom"—exists mainly for reasons Linuxers will like: to make it easier for people to get computers that respect their freedom and privacy, and to provide funding for a meaningful project, called Libreboot.

Minifree describes Libreboot as a free (libre) and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement that offers faster boot speeds, better security and many advanced features compared to most proprietary boot firmware.

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FPGA-based 96Boards SBC boasts quantum-resistant crypto

Mon, 2017-03-13 21:20

Arrow is prepping a 96Boards CE “Chamelon96” SBC that runs Linux on an Intel Cyclone V ARM/FPGA SoC, and offers WiFi, BT, and quantum-resistant security.

After Arrow revealed plans to follow up on its Qualcomm-backed DragonBoard 410C SBC with three more Linux ready, open spec 96Boards SBCs, one of the boards — the Chameleon96 — has been detailed on RocketBoards.org. The Cyclone V based, 85 x 54mm Chameleon96, which is the first 96Boards form factor SBC to include an FPGA, was also announced by SecureRF, which is offering its quantum-resistant cryptography technology on the board (see farther below).

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GUADEC 2017 Registration is Open!

Mon, 2017-03-13 21:18

This year, the GNOME project’s annual European conference will be taking place in Manchester, UK. Happening between 28th July and 2nd August, it will be the biggest and most important GNOME event of 2017. The conference will provide an opportunity to find out about the latest technical developments, learn new skills and tools, attend talks and participate in workshops and discussions. Everyone is welcome to attend – see the GUADEC 2017 website for more details.

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today's leftovers

Mon, 2017-03-13 12:28
  • A baudy Linux Hack: Hayes Modem modded to Linux Desktop (and modem time machine).
  • Post -Linux Playa at PUCP
  • Surf Demystified

    Surf is a simple, lightweight browser from Suckless Tools, the same people who brought you dmenu and dwm. When compiled and configured right, Surf is incredibly robust and stable, able to handle most websites extremely well, and it has a clean and simple layout without buttons and bars to encroach on the web material you're reading. Unfortunately, Surf is underdocumented, so most who try Surf give up after a few minutes, moving on to Firefox or Chromium or Palemoon or Midori. This web page serves as the needed documentation to make Surf a pleasure to work with.

    Surf gains a new credibility and significance now (2017), because in 2017, most browsers have declined in stability and performance, over the last several years, to the point where several of them are unusable on various distros.
    ...

  • When the memory allocator works against you

    Cloning mozilla-central with git-cinnabar requires a lot of memory. Actually too much memory to fit in a 32-bits address space.

    I hadn’t optimized for memory use in the first place. For instance, git-cinnabar keeps sha-1s in memory as hex values (40 bytes) rather than raw values (20 bytes). When I wrote the initial prototype, it didn’t matter that much, and while close(ish) to the tipping point, it didn’t require more than 2GB of memory at the time.

    Time passed, and mozilla-central grew. I suspect the recent addition of several thousands of commits and files has made things worse.

  • Microsoft's former open source VP Wim Coekaerts [iophk: "Swapnil knows better than that, I guess he's just after money now"]
  • GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

    The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

    GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

  • Consumer Reports to Begin Evaluating Products, Services for Privacy and Data Security

    The standard as it’s now written is a first draft. We hope that everyone from engineers to industry groups to concerned parents will get involved in shaping future versions of it. We’ve placed the standards on GitHub, a website that’s widely used by software developers to share ideas and work on group projects. Because GitHub can be hard for newcomers to navigate, we’ve also built a website that has the same information.

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Debian and Raspbian

Mon, 2017-03-13 12:28
  • Bits from the DPL -- January-February 2017 (update)

    Here is my report for January and February 2017. (Sorry for the second post. I forgot a paragraph and I thought it was important enough to issue an updated bits mail).

  • Debian Is Gearing Up For Stretch, Planning A Future Roadmap

    Debian project leader Mehdi Dogguy has written a status update concerning the work going on for the first two months of 2017.

  • Getting started with Perl on the Raspberry Pi

    When I spoke recently at SVPerl (Silicon Valley Perl) about Perl on the Raspberry Pi, someone asked, "I heard the Raspberry Pi is supposed to use Python. Is that right?" I was glad he asked because it's a common misconception. The Raspberry Pi can run any language. Perl, Python, and others are part of the initial installation of Raspbian Linux, the official software for the board.

    The origin of the myth is simple. The Raspberry Pi's creator, UK Computer Science professor Eben Upton, has told the story that the "Pi" part of the name was intended to sound like Python because he likes the language. He chose it as his emphasis for kids to learn coding. But he and his team made a general-purpose computer. The open source software on the Raspberry Pi places no restrictions on us. We're all free to pick what we want to run and make each Raspberry Pi our own.

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How to grow healthy open source project infrastructures

Mon, 2017-03-13 10:46

In 2013 I joined the OpenStack Infrastructure team. In the four years I spent with the team, I learned a considerable amount about the value of hosting an infrastructure for an open source project in the open itself.

In 2014 I gave a talk at All Things Open and was interviewed by Jason Baker about how we'd done our systems administration in the open. My involvement on this team led me to advocate for systems administrators to use revision control and learn about tools for working with a distributed team. At the OpenStack Summit in Austin in 2016, our team did a talk on navigating the open source OpenStack Infrastructure.

The leadership of the OpenStack project in the space of open source infrastructures inevitably led us to encounter other open source projects that were similarly open sourcing their entire, or portions of, the infrastructure used in their project. In February of 2016, I launched OpenSourceInfra.org to begin tracking these infrastructures. The source for this site is hosted on GitLab, and we've seen a steady increase in merge proposals to add new projects over the past several months.

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Games and Graphics

Mon, 2017-03-13 10:44
  • GeForce GTX 1080 Ti: Core i7 7700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Gaming Performance

    Since last week's tests of the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, a number of Phoronix readers have requested tests of this high-end GP102 graphics card to be done under both the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X and Core i7 7700K. Here are those OpenGL and Vulkan gaming results for those looking at high-end Linux gaming performance.

  • Arceri Is Working To Further Improve Mesa's Shader Cache Startup Performance

    Timothy Arceri at Valve is still working on the on-disk Mesa shader cache even though the GLSL/TGSI shader cache and RadeonSI binary caches have landed. In particular, his recent effort has been about improving the cold performance -- or when there isn't a shader cache present or it needs to be re-generated.

    Then the shader cache is cold, he and others riding Mesa Git have found it to be much slower than the previous behavior or when the shader cache is disabled on Mesa Git. As of a few days ago, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided took three minutes and 15 seconds to load with the shader cache disabled, but four minutes and 23 seconds to load when the cache is enabled but cold. Fortunately, he's worked out a patch to reduce that cold cache time to three minutes and 33 seconds. So there is still some time involved when needing to store the shader in the cache, but it's much better than before. That patch is outlined here.

  • Nouveau Patch For Enabling The GLSL/TGSI On-Disk Shader Cache
  • The Linux Game Jam 2017 is a thing now, go sign up
  • City Climber, a silly physics-based game about climbing released for Linux, some thoughts

    GOL contributor SangreDeReptil wrote about City Climber [Steam] coming to Linux last year and now this silly physics-based climbing game has a Linux release. I checked it out!

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Security News

Mon, 2017-03-13 10:28
  • The Nintendo Switch already hacked through a known vulnerability?

    It appears that the not-so-well hidden Nintendo Switch browser shipped with a bunch of old vulnerabilities that hackers were able to leverage. Yesterday, hacker qwertyoruiop (known for Jailbreaks of multiple iOS versions, and who also contributed to the PS4 1.76 Jailbreak) posted a screenshot of what seems to be a Webkit exploit running on the Nintendo Switch.

  • Linux: fix an existing bug for 11 years in the Kernel
  • Security, Consumer Reports, and Failure

    As one can imagine there were a fair number of “they’ll get it wrong” sort of comments. They will get it wrong, at first, but that’s not a reason to pick on these guys. They’re quite brave to take this task on, it’s nearly impossible if you think about the state of security (especially consumer security). But this is how things start. There is no industry that has gone from broken to perfect in one step. It’s a long hard road when you have to deal with systemic problems in an industry. Consumer product security problems may be larger and more complex than any other industry has ever had to solve thanks to things such as globalization and how inexpensive tiny computers have become.

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