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Updated: 31 min 51 sec ago

Will Anything Make Linux Obsolete?

Tue, 2017-05-09 18:22

Remember blogging? Hell, remember magazine publishing? Shouldn't be hard. You're reading some now.

Both are still around, but they're obsolete—at least relatively. Two cases in point: my blog and Linux Journal.

Back when blogging was a thing, in the early 2000s, about 20,000 people subscribed to RSS feeds of my original blog (1999–2007, still mothballed here). At its peak, I posted many times per day and had a strong sense of connection with my readership.

Same went, by the way, for my postings in Linux Journal, on our website and on one of our own blogs, called IT Garage—lots of readers, lots of engagement.

Most early bloggers were journalists by profession or avocation—good writers, basically. Some blogs turned into online pubs. BoingBoing, TechCrunch and TPM all started as blogs.

But blogging began to wane after Twitter and Facebook showed up in 2006. After that journalism also waned, as "content generation" became the way to fill online publications. Participating in "social media" also became a requisite function for journalists still hoping to stay active online (if not also employed)

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Security Leftovers

Tue, 2017-05-09 18:17
  • 4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

    There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

    It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

  • 'Crazy bad' bug in Microsoft's Windows malware scanner can be used to install malware

    Miscreants can turn the tables on Microsoft and use its own antivirus engine against Windows users – by abusing it to install malware on vulnerable machines.

    A particularly nasty security flaw exists in Redmond's anti-malware software, which is packaged and marketed in various forms: Windows Defender, Windows Intune Endpoint Protection, Microsoft Security Essentials, Microsoft System Center Endpoint Protection, Microsoft Forefront Security for SharePoint, Microsoft Endpoint Protection, and Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection. All are, at this moment, at risk. It is switched on by default in Windows 8, 8.1, 10, and Windows Server 2012.

    It is possible for hackers to craft files that are booby-trapped with malicious code, and this nasty payload is executed inadvertently and automatically by the scanner while inspecting the data. The injected code runs with administrative privileges, allowing it to gain full control of the system, install spyware, steal files, and so on.

    In other words, while Microsoft's scanner is searching a downloaded file for malware, it can be tricked into running and installing the very sort of software nasty it's supposed to catch and kill.

  • [Microsoft Employee:] Why your security appliance will be hacked

    I’m no world-class hacker/penetration tester, but I’ve been able to break into any organization I’ve been (legally) hired to do so in an hour or less, except for one place that took me three hours. That was on my second engagement with the customer after it had implemented many of the protections I had recommended during my first visit.

  • How the Macron campaign slowed cyberattackers

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Leftovers: Gaming

Tue, 2017-05-09 18:16

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4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

Tue, 2017-05-09 17:34

There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

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LibreOffice 5.2.7 Is the Last in the Series, End of Life Set for June 4, 2017

Tue, 2017-05-09 17:28

The Document Foundation announced a few moments ago the release of the seventh and last scheduled point release for the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite.

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Cinnamon 3.4 Desktop Officially Released, It's Coming Soon to a Distro Near You

Tue, 2017-05-09 17:27

Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre was happy to announce today the official availability of the Cinnamon 3.4 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

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Qt Creator 4.3 RC1 released

Tue, 2017-05-09 17:25

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.3 RC1.

Since the Beta release we have kept ourselves busy fixing bugs, so please take this last opportunity to test and give us feedback. Take a look at the Beta release blog post or the more detailed change log for an overview of what has changed in 4.3.

Also: Qt Creator 4.3 RC1 Now Available For Developers

Qt 5.9 To Be An LTS Release, Qt 6 Planning On Radar

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Volunteers tailor Ubuntu Linux to UK’s health service

Tue, 2017-05-09 17:03

A group of Britisch IT health care specialists have tailored the Ubuntu Linux distribution for use by the UK’s national health service (NHS) on its workstations. The alpha version of NHSbuntu was unveiled at the South West CIO Forum on 27 April.

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today's leftovers

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:38
  • Today's bonkers bug report: Microsoft Edge can't print numbers

    Microsoft's Edge browser is the subject of an amusing new bug report, alleging it somehow manages to screw up printing strings of numbers.

    The report on Microsoft's developer portal describes the issue where PDF files printed through Edge will display numbers and text incorrectly when exported.

    "Edge displays PDF correctly but printed content differs notably," the bug notice reads. "Printed content depends on selected printer, on printer settings, and on used computer (please try a different setup if first result looks correct)."

    The report includes a pair of examples in a numbered table. The first table is sequentially numbered from 1-140. The second table, which is said to have been printed in Edge through the "print-to-PDF" function, has the boxes numbered out of sequence with the first six as "1,1,4,4,4,7".

  • Black Lab Enterprise Linux Goes Free Again as Income Comes from Hardware Sales
  • Apricity OS, An Arch Linux-based Distro, Is Now Officially Dead
  • Highlights of the OBS frontend development sprint

    This is the first in a series of posts in which the frontend hackers want to report to the OBS community about the progress they have made developing the web user interface and the API of the OBS. You can expect these posts to come in roughly every 2 weeks, and we very much hope you enjoy them!

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Leftovers: Software

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:38
  • Coreboot 4.6 Released
  • 4 terminal applications with great command-line UIs

    In this article, I'll look at a shortcoming of command-line interfaces—discoverability—and a few ways to overcome this problem.

    I love command lines. My first command line was DOS 6.2, back in 1997. I learned the syntax for various commands and showed off how to list hidden files in a directory (attrib). I would carefully craft my commands one character at a time. When I made a mistake, I would proceed to retype the command from the beginning. One fine day someone showed me how to traverse the history using the up and down arrow keys and I was blown away.

  • KStars 2.7.7 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows!

    I'm glad to announce the release of KStars 2.7.7 for Linux, Mac, and Windows!

    In this release, Robert Lancaster dedicated a lot of time to improving KStars What's Interesting Tool (WIT). It is now significantly improved and offers a rich educational experience to explore the heavens! Users can now explore many naked eye and deep sky objects, in addition to addon catalogs offered by KStars such as the Sharpless Catalog.

    Users wishing to have more fine control on what objects to observe and/or image should be using the Observation Planner that enable filtering of objects with custom constraints and limits. For casual users looking to find out what's interesting tonight, then this tool is the optimal choice.

  • Evolution 3.24.2 Open-Source Email and Groupware Client Brings Many Improvements

    The GNOME Project is preparing these days to release the second and last scheduled point release for the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, and some of the core components and apps are already receiving new versions.

    That's right, we're talking about GNOME 3.24.2, which should be out in the coming days, around the date of May 10, 2017, bringing various small enhancements and bug fixes to some of the components distributed as part of the GNOME 3.24 Stack. The Evolution email and groupware client is, again, among the first to be updated.

  • System76 Preps Consistent GNOME Experience for Their PCs Powered by Ubuntu 17.10

    System76's CEO Carl Richell is reporting today on some of the upcoming changes the Linux hardware company plans to make in regards to the look and feel of the GNOME desktop environment shipping with the next major Ubuntu release.

    As you are very much aware by now, Canonical is moving away from their unique and gorgeous Unity user interface to the GNOME 3 desktop environment for the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release later this year on October 19, 2017.

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today's howtos

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:37

Linux and Linux Foundation

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:37

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Linux and FOSS Events: DebConf17, OpenStack Summit, LPC, and Fedora

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:34
  • Bursary applications for DebConf17 are closing in 48 hours!

    This is a final reminder: if you intend to apply for a DebConf17 bursary and have not yet done so, please proceed as soon as possible.

    Bursary applications for DebConf17 will be accepted until May 10th at 23:59 UTC. Applications submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

  • OpenStack Summit Emphasizes Emerging Deployment Models

    The OpenStack Summit kicked off here today with multiple announcements and an emphasis on the evolution of the cloud deployment model.

    Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation, said during his keynote that there has been a 44 percent year-over-year increase in the volume of OpenStack deployments, with OpenStack now running on more than 5 million compute cores around the world.

  • OpenStack Foundation slams claims open source cloud platform's days are numbered

    The OpenStack Foundation is on a mission to clear up a number of misconceptions about the open source cloud platform, particularly those pertaining to its often predicted demise.

  • OpenStack Summit: All the biggest news from Red Hat to Rackspace & Dell EMC
  • Submission deadline for LPC refereed track proposals extended

    The deadline for submitting refereed track proposals for the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) has been extended until May 13. "The refereed track will have 50-minute presentations on a specific aspect of Linux "plumbing" (e.g. core libraries, media creation/playback, display managers, init systems, kernel APIs/ABIs, etc.) that are chosen by the LPC committee to be given during all three days of the conference." LPC will be held September 13-15 in Los Angeles, CA.

  • Conference travel for speakers

    In Free and Open Source Software culture, conferences became an important part of the community. Most of the projects or communities do the work over this beautiful thing known as the Internet, people are taking part from the warmth of their home. Conferences are the only time when we all get a chance to meet, discuss new ideas, share the knowledge among ourselves. Conference speakers are generally the volunteers who agree to spend a lot of time to prepare and then give the talk, do the QA session. This also involves a lot of travel, for any mid-sized to a big conference, you will always find at least couple of speakers traveling half of the world to give those talks.

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Linux Devices

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:33
  • Raspberry Digital Signage 9.0 released

    Raspberry Digital Signage is an operating system designed for digital signage installations on the Raspberry Pi: it displays a full-screen browser view restricted to a specified (web) resource.

  • Design your own RISC-V SoC with SiFive’s new “hassle-free” process

    SiFive announced free downloads and tools for rapid evaluation of its “fully synthesizable” RISC-V based Coreplex E31 and E51 cores on a $99 FPGA dev board.

    The 64-bit RISC-V ISA (instruction set architecture) was developed at the University of California, Berkeley in 2010, and subsequently became the basis of a University of Cambridge sponsored lowRISC open-source SoC project in mid-2014.

  • Exclusive: Samsung giveaway device will be the Gear S3 at the Tizen Developer Conference

    We’ve told you in an earlier post that the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC) this year would bring a free device giveaway, but we didn’t have more information in place at the time. Now, a trusted source has provided an insider tip about the TDC: the free device giveaway prize for 2017 will be a Samsung Gear S3 smartwatch. As for whether the prize is the Gear S3 Frontier or Gear S3 Classic, we do not know – so you could be looking at an LTE-capable smartwatch (Gear S3 Frontier or Gear S3 Classic LTE) or a WiFi-only model (Gear S3 Classic, non-LTE), but the smart money is probably on the WiFi only model. There could be a choice involved with this free device giveaway, but we’ll have to wait for more details to confirm.

  • Now, Android 'O' Beta version coming soon says Google
  • Low-cost Android phones to get iPhone features with new Qualcomm chips

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Leftovers: OSS

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:32
  • MapD's GPU-powered database is now open source

    As announced in a press release and blog post, the core database and its "associated visualization libraries" are available under the Apache 2.0 license. But enterprise-level features like the high availability, LDAP, ODBC, and horizontal scaling functionality—many of which debuted in the 3.0 version released earlier this month—will be kept close to the chest.

  • Sprint, Intel Join Forces on C3PO 5G User Plane Open Source Project

    SAN JOSE, California —Although it’s not May 4, the annual day of celebration to honor the iconic “Star Wars” movie, it still seems fitting to talk about Sprint’s new open source project, called C3PO. Last week at the 2017 NFV World Congress, Sprint revealed it’s working with Intel on the open source project the companies believe will result in a more flexible and scalable 5G control plane. C3PO stands for CUPS [control and user plane separation] for packet optimization.

  • Dell EMC's newest switches will come with its open network OS

    Dell's drive into open networking accelerated on Monday with the announcement of the first switches to ship with OS10, the company's network operating system that's based on open source.

    At Dell EMC World in Las Vegas, the company introduced two data-center switches running OS10 Enterprise Edition, an enhanced version of the open-source OS that Dell announced early last year.

    The software is based on technologies from the Linux Foundation and the Open Compute Project and is already available through an extended beta to customers who already have hardware. The Enterprise Edition is a complete software platform, including Dell's networking stack, but its open-source foundation means it can be extended with third-party software, said Jeff Baher, Dell EMC's executive director, networking.

  • Verizon unlocks the power of open source and virtualization with the addition of new whitebox options to its universal CPE offer
  • Dell EMC must adapt or die in open-source and cloud-dominated world, say analysts
  • 8 ways to get started with open source hardware

    Alan Kay, famed computer scientist, once said, "People who are really serious about software should make their own hardware." I'd argue that's as true today as it was in 1982 when he said it. However, what's changed between then and now is that hardware has gotten faster, smaller, and most importantly: cheaper. it's now possible to buy a full computer for $5.

    With big companies driving down prices for their own products, it's grown a manufacturing ecosystem capable of producing production-grade hardware that's cheap enough and accessible enough that it is now within reach of normal individuals. This accessibility and affordability are helping drive things like crowdfunding and the maker movement, but they're also giving way to more individuals being able to participate in open source through open source hardware.

  • The IDAR Graph

    UML (Unified Modeling Language)6 is the de facto standard for representing object-oriented designs. It does a fine job of recording designs, but it has a severe problem: its diagrams don't convey what humans need to know, making them hard to understand. This is why most software developers use UML only when forced to.1

    For example, the UML diagrams in figures 1 and 2 portray the embedded software in a fax machine. While these diagrams are attractive, they don't even tell you which objects control which others. Which object is the topmost controller over this fax machine? You don't know. Which object(s) control the Modem object? You don't know.

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Security Leftovers

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:29
  • [Old] Intel ME: The Way of Static Analysis
  • CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Users Get New Kernel That Patches CVE-2017-7895

    CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi announced today the availability of new stable kernels for the CloudLinux 7, CloudLinux 6, and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid operating systems.

    The updated kernel is available for download right now from the production repository of the CloudLinux 7, CloudLinux 6 Hybrid, and CloudLinux 6 operating systems, versioned 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.47. It replaces kernel 3.10.0-427.36.1.lve1.4.44 on CloudLinux 7 and Hybrid, as well as kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25 on CloudLinux 6.

  • Mac users installing popular DVD ripper get nasty backdoor instead

    Hackers compromised a download server for a popular DVD-ripping software named HandBrake and used it to push stealthy malware that stole victims' password keychains, password vaults, and possibly the master credentials that decrypted them, security researchers said Monday.

  • Google's Fuzz bot exposes over 1,000 open-source bugs

    Google's OSS-Fuzz bug-hunting robot has been hard at work, and in recent months, over 1,000 bugs have been exposed.

    According to Chrome Security engineers Oliver Chang and Abhishek Arya, software engineer Kostya Serebryany and Google Security program manager Josh Armour, the OSS-Fuzz bot has been scouring the web over the past five months in the pursuit of security vulnerabilities which can be exploited.

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Announcement of LibreOffice 5.2.7

Tue, 2017-05-09 14:20

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.2.7, the seventh minor release of the LibreOffice 5.2 family, targeted to enterprises and individual users in production environments.

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