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Updated: 26 min 54 sec ago

Programming: GCC and Java

Wed, 2017-06-21 18:08
  • D Language Support Cleared For Being Added To GCC

    The GCC Steering Committee has approved of allowing the D language front-end and runtime to be included as part of the GNU Compiler Collection.

  • Intel Posts Control-Flow Enforcement Support For GCC

    Last year Intel published a research whitepaper for Control-Flow Enforcement Technology (CET) while they have now posted a set of GCC patches for implementing this safeguard within the GCC compiler.

  • ARM's Cortex A55/A75 Get Tuned Up In GCC

    ARM's Cortex A55 and A75 processors have received their initial tuning support within the GCC 8 compiler code.

  • Mikeal Rogers: Node.js Will Overtake Java Within a Year

    Mikeal Rogers has been with the Node.js Foundation since day one. His job as community manager for the foundation involved hands-on oversight of operations, from communications and marketing to conference planning, to running board meetings. Rogers’ main contribution, though, is organization and coordination within the Node.js open source community — particularly in scaling governance and processes as the project has accelerated from a dozen early contributors to many hundreds.

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Mozilla News: Firefox Focus for Android, $2 Million Prize to Decentralize, and Ad Blocking

Wed, 2017-06-21 17:53
  • Firefox Focus for Android Promises to Block Annoying Ads, Protect Users' Privacy

    Mozilla announced today that the Firefox Focus web browser that the Open Source company launched last year for iPhone and iPad devices is now also available for Android.

    Designed from the ground up to be simple, fast, and always private, the Firefox Focus mobile app for Android doesn't feature tabs and it's free of any visual clutter that might get in your way when surfing the Internet from your mobile device. It comes built-in with an ad blocker that promises to block annoying ads.

  • A $2 Million Prize to Decentralize the Web. Apply Today

    Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are offering a $2 million prize for big ideas that decentralize the web. And we’re accepting applications starting today.

    Mozilla believes the Internet is a global public resource that must be open and accessible to all. In the 21st century, a lack of Internet access is far more than an inconvenience — it’s a staggering disadvantage. Without access, individuals miss out on substantial economic and educational opportunities, government services and the ability to communicate with friends, family and peers.

    Currently, 34 million people in the U.S. — 10% of the country’s population — lack access to high-quality Internet connectivity. This number jumps to 39% in rural communities and 41% on Tribal lands. And when disasters strike, millions more can lose vital connectivity right when it’s needed most.

  • Google, Mozilla both say they sped up the web today. One by blocking ads. One with ads

    Mozilla's announced that its “Firefox Focus” ad-busting browser has made it to Android.

    Focus has been available on iOS since late 2016. The browser's lead feature is hiding traces of web searches so that ads can't follow you around the web. Mozilla feels doing so enhances privacy and speeds up surfing as you won't be downloading all the background ad-serving cruft built into web pages.

    Now it's released the browser for Android, and fair enough too given that iOS' market share now trails that of Google's mobile OS.

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Univention Corporate Server 4.2-1

Wed, 2017-06-21 17:49
  • Debian-Based Univention Corporate Server 4.2 Linux OS Gets First Point Release

    Univention GmbH's Maren Abatielos is today informing us about the release and immediate availability for download of the first point release to the Debian-based Univention Corporate Server 4.2 server-oriented operating system.

    Being the first to be rebased on the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, Univention Corporate Server 4.2 launched in early April this year with increased binary compatibility with Debian, systemd as default init system for new installations, MBD3 support for the Univention Directory listener, and a new configurable web portal.

  • First point release of UCS 4.2 published

    With UCS 4.2-1 the first point release for Univention Corporate Server 4.2 is now available.

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Boot Repair Tool - Repair The Most Boot Related Problems

Wed, 2017-06-21 17:44

​We all encounter many times the boot related problems and most of them are simply related to GRUB. Many people find it way too hard sometimes to enter long commands or search forums to find the way they can solve it. Today I am going to tell you how to use a simple, small software to solve most of the boot related problems. This tool is known as Boot Repair Tool. Now no more talk and get to work.

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KDE News: Calamares, FOSSASIA, DigiKam, Curves, KRuler, and More

Wed, 2017-06-21 17:28
  • Calamares Testing

    My project for Blue Systems is maintaining Calamares, the distro-independent installer framework. Not surprisingly, working on it means installing lots of Linux distro’s. Here’s my physical-hardware testing setup, which is two identical older HP desktop machines and a stack of physical DVDs. Very old-school. Often I use Virtual Box, but sometimes the hum of a DVD is just what I need to calm down. There’s a KDE Neon, a Manjaro and a Netrunner DVD there, but the machine labeled Ubuntu is running Kannolo and sporting an openSUSE Geeko.

  • FOSSASIA SUMMIT 2017 and KDE

    I got an opportunity to represent KDE in FOSSASIA 2017 held in mid-March at Science Center, Singapore. There were many communities showcasing their hardware, designs, graphics, and software.

  • GSoC’17 : First Blog

    I’m glad to share this opportunity to be selected 2 times for Google Summer of Code project under KDE. It’s my second consecutive year working with DigiKam team.

    DigiKam is an advanced digital photo management application which enables user to view, manage, edit, organise, tag and share photographs under Linux systems. DigiKam has a feature to search items by similarity. This require to compute image fingerprints stored in main database. These data can take space on disk especially with huge collection and bloat the main database a lots and increase complexity to backup main database which include all main information for each item registered, as tags, label, comments, etc.

  • A tale of 2 curves

    As my first subject for this animation blog series, we will be taking a look at Animation curves.

    Curves, or better, easing curves, is one of the first concepts we are exposed to when dealing with the subject of animation in the QML space.

  • Pimping KRuler

    KRuler, in case you don't know it, is a simple software ruler to measure lengths on your desktop. It is one of the oldest KDE tools, its first commit dating from November 4th, 2000. Yes, it's almost old enough to vote.

    I am a long time KRuler user. It gets the job done, but I have often found myself saying "one day I'll fix this or that". And never doing it.

    Hidpi screen really hurt the poor app, so I finally decided to do something and spend some time during my daily commute on it.

  • Adding API dox QCH files generation to KDE Frameworks builds

    Things seemed to work okay on first tests, so last September a pull request was made to add some respective macro module to Extra-CMake-Modules to get things going and a blog post “Adding API dox generation to the build by CMake macros” was written.

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Linux on Devices: Linaro, Raspberry Pi, Joule, Edison, and Galileo

Wed, 2017-06-21 16:55
  • ARM-Android open source platform for Linaro

    Huawei is backing an initiative for an AOSP (Android open source project) using ARM-based hardware and the Linaro open source collaborative engineering organization to develop the software. Their common aim: an ARM ecosystem.

    The new HiKey 960 dev platform from Huawei is now listed on the 96Boards website and will become available through global distribution channels. It is expected to be of interest to mobile developers and product design for markets like digital signage, point of sale (POS) and robotics.

  • Intel pulls the plug on its Joule, Edison, and Galileo boards

    Intel is discontinuing its Linux-ready, Atom-based Intel Joule and Intel Edison COMs, its Quark-based Galileo Gen 2 SBC, and its Recon Jet sports eyewear.

  • 3 reasons to turn your Raspberry Pi into a DNS server with dnsmasq

    By making DNS requests from a local Raspberry Pi instead of a remote server, you can realize a few advantages. Fetching any kind of data from a local area network will always be faster than fetching something from the Internet.

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Games: Back to FOSS Roots and More Multi-/Cross-Platform Games (Proprietary)

Wed, 2017-06-21 16:47

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Graphics News: Intel KVMGT/XenGT GVT-g, Radeon Instinct Accelerator, Intel Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 4.13

Wed, 2017-06-21 16:33
  • Intel KVMGT/XenGT GVT-g Updated For 2017-Q2

    Intel developers have issued their quarterly official update to their GVT-g graphics virtualization technology stack for Linux KVM and Xen virtualization.

  • Radeon Instinct Accelerators Get Ready To Ship

    Not only is AMD getting ready to take on Intel in the server space with their just-launched EPYC 7000 series, they are looking to battle NVIDIA now in the GPU server arena. Following their announcement at the end of last year, Radeon Instinct accelerators for GPU compute servers are getting ready to ship.

  • Intel Preps Another Batch Of Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 4.13

    Intel has queued up another round of feature changes slated for the Linux 4.13 kernel.

    Intel open-source developers had already queued up a fair amount of work already this cycle in DRM-Next while today's pull request will likely be their last batch of real feature work with the DRM-Next window closing around this week.

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Devuan and Debian Updates

Wed, 2017-06-21 16:21
  • Re: [DNG] I have a question about libsystemd0 in devuan ascii

     

    As I see it, GNOME/Freedesktop.org/Red Hat/etc. are moving toward an
    Android model where everything else is all but officially excluded
    except for apps written specifically for their environment.  

  • Upgrading to Debian Stretch

    I’ve done it. Our server and all but one of our clients have been dist-upgraded to Debian Stretch. The dist-upgrade went smoothly on all clients. The server was another matter. Oh, the dist-upgrade was smooth but web-applications were ripped by the migration from PHP 5 to PHP 7. It was trivial to convert my recipe application to PHP 7, just a handful of MySQL calls needed changing. phpBB, OTOH, does not support PHP 7 and since we rarely use it, I will just remove it. It was useful when I taught in schools but I don’t need it now in the era of smartphones in every pocket. People use FB or e-mail or “messaging” and carry on. Coppermine Photo Gallery has a double whammy. It’s no longer supported by anyone and so will not be upgraded by the FLOSS community, most likely. I have invested quite a bit of work annotating photos in the database so I don’t want to abandon CPG. I can put it in a virtual machine running Jessie forever. It’s on the LAN so security is not much of an issue. My local library of Gutenberg texts is another matter. The CGI script was written in PASCAL, so that’s not a problem but the SWISH-e PHP interface does not build against PHP 7. The SWISH-e plugin is ancient, about 2012, so it’s not clear whether it will ever work with PHP 7. I just don’t want to dig that deep. SWISH-e still works so I could rewrite everything in PASCAL and carry on, but I could also move this web-application to a virtual machine running PHP 5. This library also was very valuable when I taught in northern schools with shaky Internet connections but it’s less important now. I can also use SWISH-e from the commandline if necessary. phpMyAdmin worked smoothly. It’s from Debian’s repository, of course.

  • So, Stretch happened...

    Things mostly went very well, and we've released Debian 9 this weekend past. Many many people worked together to make this possible, and I'd like to extend my own thanks to all of them.

    As a project, we decided to dedicate Stretch to our late founder Ian Murdock. He did much of the early work to get Debian going, and inspired many more to help him. I had the good fortune to meet up with Ian years ago at a meetup attached to a Usenix conference, and I remember clearly he was a genuinely nice guy with good ideas. We'll miss him.

    For my part in the release process, again I was responsible for producing our official installation and live images. Release day itself went OK, but as is typical the process ran late into Saturday night / early Sunday morning. We made and tested lots of different images, although numbers were down from previous releases as we've stopped making the full CD sets now.

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Microsoft Openwashing by the Linux Foundation, Lockin Model, and More Openwashing With the Linux Foundation

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:12

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OSS: Opus 1.2, GraphQL, casync, Tensor2Tensor and More

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:09

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Fedora 26 Plans, CDK 3.0 on Fedora 25, and Bodhi 2.8.0

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:07
  • FEDORA WORKSTATION 26 AND BEYOND

    Felt it been to long since I did another Fedora Workstation update. We spend a lot of time trying to figure out how we can best spend our resources to produce the best desktop possible for our users, because even though Red Hat invests more into the Linux desktop than any other company by quite a margin, our resources are still far from limitless. So we have a continuous effort of asking ourselves if each of the areas we are investing in are the right ones that give our users the things they need the most, so below is a sampling of the things we are working on.

  • Fedora Continues Working On Better NVIDIA Support, PipeWire Could Replace PulseAudio

    Christian Schaller of Red Hat has provided an update on some of the feature work that's coming around the corner with Fedora Workstation 26 and other work to land in the future.

  • Running CDK 3.0 on Fedora 25

    Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK) provides a Container Development Environment (CDE) that allows users to build a virtualized environment for OpenShift. This environment is similar to the user’s production environment and does not need other hardware or a physical cluster. CDK is designed to work on a single user’s desktop computer.

  • Bodhi: 2.8.0

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.02 Released

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:07

OpenMandriva Lx 3.02 is now available as the latest version of this Mandriva/Mandrake-derived Linux distribution.

OpenMandriva Lx 3.02 comes packing the Linux 4.11 kernel, systemd 233, KDE Frameworks 5.33 + Plasma 5.9.5 + Qt 5.8, X.Org Server 1.19.3 / Wayland 1.12, and Mesa 17.1.1 as offering a range of updated packages compared to its prior release.

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Using Kdump for examining Linux Kernel crashes

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:02

The kexec mechanism has components in the kernel as well as in user space. The kernel provides few system calls for kexec reboot functionality. A user space tool called kexec-tools uses those calls and provides an executable to load and boot the second kernel. Sometimes a distribution also adds wrappers on top of kexec-tools, which helps capture and save the dump for various dump target configurations. In this article, I will use the name distro-kexec-tools to avoid confusion between upstream kexec-tools and distro-specific kexec-tools code. My example will use the Fedora Linux distribution.

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Security: new updates, new flaws, and SELinux

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:00
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Never Trust Yellow Fruit

    You've probably heard about the WiFi Pineapple from Hak5. It's a fascinating device that allows you to do some creepy pen testing. It's the sort of tool that could be used for evil, but it's also incredibly useful for securing networks.

    The hardware is fairly basic and resembles an off-the-shelf router. The multiple network interfaces really shine, however, when paired with the operating system. The WiFi Pineapple software creates a rogue, hidden access point that purposefully tricks clients into connecting to it instead of the AP they're usually connected to.

  • Time to Patch: 'Stack Clash' Vulnerability Affects Wide Range of Unix-like OSes
  • Stack Clash Vulnerability Exploits Linux Stack Guard
  • What capabilities do I really need in my container?

    A few years ago the SELinux team realized that more and more applications were getting EPERM returns when a syscall requested some access. Most operators understood EPERM (Permission Denied) inside of a log file to mean something was wrong with the Ownership of a process of the contents it was trying to access or the permission flags on the object were wrong. This type of Access Control is called DAC (Discretionary Access Control) and under certain conditions SELinux also caused the kernel to return EPERM. This caused Operators to get confused and is one of the reasons that Operators did not like SELinux. They would ask, why didn’t httpd report that Permission denied because of SELinux? We realized that there was a growing list of other tools besides regular DAC and SELinux which could cause EPERM. Things like SECCOMP, Dropped Capabilities, other LSM … The problem was that the processes getting the EPERM had no way to know why they got EPERM. The only one that knew was the kernel and in a lot of cases the kernel was not even logging the fact that it denied access. At least SELinux denials usually show up in the audit log (AVCs). The goal of Friendly EPERM was to allow the processes to figure out why they got EPERM and make it easier for admin to diagnose.

  • Erebus Resurfaces as Linux Ransomware

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Why aren't more researchers using open source?

Wed, 2017-06-21 10:00

Academic researchers depend on a variety of highly specialized software to power their studies. The commercial software options in common use are expensive; either investigators must purchase a large number of licenses for common applications like data analysis tools, or they have to buy costly single licenses for specialized software, such as an application for a specific laboratory device.

It's surprising, then, that so few researchers are using open source instead of expensive commercial software. Not only does open source produce cost savings over commercial options—money that can be invested back into research—it also provides researchers the opportunity to develop software for their own specific needs, then share it with others doing similar work.

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KTechLab Revived

Wed, 2017-06-21 09:57
  • KTechLab is coming back

    KTechLab, the IDE for microcontrollers and electronics has joined KDE. Below I’m summarizing its current status and plans.

  • KDE KTechLab Is Being Revived After Nearly A Decade Hiatus

    The KTechLab integrated development environment focused on micro-controller circuit design and simulation is back to being under development after not seeing a major release since 2009.

    KTechLab has been stalled for the better part of a decade: at the time of its last release, it was working to transition from Qt3 to Qt4. The good news though is development on this IDE for microcontrollers and electronics has been rebooted and is now officially a KDE project.

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