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DebConf17 Reports

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:45
  • Why TUF does not shine (for APT repositories)

    In DebConf17 there was a talk about The Update Framework, short TUF. TUF claims to be a plug-in solution to software updates, but while it has the same practical level of security as apt, it also has the same shortcomings, including no way to effectively revoke keys.

    TUF divides signing responsibilities into roles: A root role, a targets rule (signing stuff to download), a snapshots rule (signing meta data), and a time stamp rule (signing a time stamp file). There also is a mirror role for signing a list of mirrors, but we can ignore that for now. It strongly recommends that all keys except for timestamp and mirrors are kept offline, which is not applicable for APT repositories – Ubuntu updates the repository every 30 minutes, imagine doing that with offline keys. An insane proposal.

  • I went all the way to Montréal for DebConf17, and all I got was a new MUA

    On Sunday night I got back from Montréal, where I attended both DebCamp17 and DebConf17. It was a wonderful two weeks. All I really did was work on Debian for roughly eight hours per day, interspersed with getting to know both people I’ve been working with since I first began contributing to Debian in late 2015, and people I didn’t yet know. But this was all I really needed to be doing. There was no need to engage in distracting myself.

    I enjoyed the first week more. There were sufficiently few people present that you could know at least all of their faces, and interesting-sounding talks didn’t interrupt making progress on one’s own work or unblocking other people’s work. In the second week it was great to meet people who were only present for the second week, but it felt more like regular Debian, in that I was often waiting on other people or they were waiting on me.

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Server: NASA, Kubernetes at GitHub, and Docker in Mainframes

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:43
  • NASA Launches Supercomputer Servers into Space

    During that time, it will run a series of supercomputing benchmarks, including High Performance Linpack, the High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) suite, and the NASA-derived NAS parallel benchmarks. Its operation will be compared to HPE servers of the same construction back on Earth. The idea is to make sure that the ISS-based system is able to deal with the realities of cosmic radiation, solar flares, unstable electrical power, and wide variations in temperature.

  • Kubernetes at GitHub

    Over the last year, GitHub has gradually evolved the infrastructure that runs the Ruby on Rails application responsible for github.com and api.github.com. We reached a big milestone recently: all web and API requests are served by containers running in Kubernetes clusters deployed on our metal cloud. Moving a critical application to Kubernetes was a fun challenge, and we’re excited to share some of what we’ve learned with you today.

  • Docker Can Now Containerize Legacy Apps Running on Mainframes

    Docker this week announced the first update to its rebranded flagship platform with the release of Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) 17.06. Back in March, Docker rolled out the first Docker EE, built on the backs of what had been known as Docker Commercially Supported and Docker Datacenter.

    The new release comes on the heels of a report last week from Bloomberg that the container company has been raising money, which will result in $75 million dollars being added to its coffers by the end of the month, bringing with it a new valuation of $1.3 billion — up $300 million from its previous valuation.

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Linux Foundation's Dronecode, Ethereum Blockchain, and Kernel Changes

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:41

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Games: Out of Reach, Darkwood and F1 2017

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:36

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FOSS: Redox, SDN BSD and Much More

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:33
  • Rust-Written Redox OS Closer To Self-Hosting

    The Redox operating system, the interesting original OS written around the Rust programming language, is closer to self-hosting as a result of this year's Google Summer of Code.

    The GSoC's goal has been to get Redox OS self-hosting where it can natively run a compiler toolchain for itself from within Redox rather than needing to build support on another platform.

    This summer has seen Redox OS now running on it GNU binutils, GCC, GNU Make, Dash, Curl, LLVM and Rustc, and more, but with these packages there are some limitations.

  • Podcast: CLUECON SPECIAL REPORT – The open source developer show bringing open source telephony together

    FreeSWITCH is a scalable open source cross-platform telephony platform designed to route and interconnect popular communication protocols using audio, video, text or any other form of media. It was created in 2006 to fill the void left by proprietary commercial solutions. FreeSWITCH also provides a stable telephony platform on which many applications can be developed using a wide range of free tools.

  • What are the differences between SDN open source and vendor products?

    Choosing between SDN open source and vendor-provided options is easier when you know some of the available choices. Industry analyst Lee Doyle lists some of the options.

  • Serverless launches open source Event Gateway to tie cloud functions together

    There’s a new open source tool in town for tying different event-driven functions together. Serverless, a startup that builds tools for building applications without having to worry about underlying infrastructure, announced a new Event Gateway project today that provides developers with a platform-agnostic tool for passing events from one program to another.

    Event Gateway combines two different sets of functionality: an API gateway that lets developers monitor and manage connections between different applications, and a publish-subscribe (Pub/Sub) service that is designed to route information from one to another.

  • Toad in the (open source data toolset) hole [Ed: openwashing proprietary software merely because it "supports" MySQL]

    Systems management and security software company Quest Software has announced its Toad Edge product.

    This is a commercial database toolset for software application development teams and database administrators (DBAs) to develop and manage open source database environments with the first release supporting MySQL.

  • Where are You Running Off To? Open Source GIS and Fitness Route Tracking
  • Juniper Wants OpenContrail to Garner More of the Spotlight

    Juniper Networks is looking to increase its focus on OpenContrail, noting the community around the open source software-defined networking (SDN) controller has been overshadowed by its commercial Contrail platform.

  • Visual Search Goes Open Source

    The Zappen visual search repository is available on Github under the LGPL license at https://github.com/ZappenVDNS. Future planned enhancements include machine learning and integration with the EmerDNS distributed domain name system.

  • HAMMER2 File-System Looks Like Its Getting Closer To Being Usable On DragonFlyBSD

    Matthew Dillon began developing the HAMMER2 file-system in 2012 and back then he talked about it being until at least 2013 when it would be usable, etc. Five years later, it's looking like HAMMER2 is closer to being usable on DragonFlyBSD systems.

    HAMMER2 offers greater redundancy, native compression support, writable snapshtos, and other improvements over Dillon's original HAMMER file-system.

  • Logging, backups, and newsyslog.conf on FreeBSD

    Disk space is cheap, and time is not.

  • Richard Stallman made me change the name of my music project

    What do music and software have in common, and how far can you apply the principles of the free software movement to the music industry? Those are questions that pianist Kimiko Ishizaka and I set out to answer in 2012 when we released the Open Goldberg Variations and again in 2015 with the Open Well-Tempered Clavier. Now, we are asking for support for our next big Bach project on Kickstarter.com.

  • Making an online survey? Try EUSurvey with upgraded features!

    The European Commission has released a new version of its multilingual online survey software EUSurvey. The enhanced OSS version 1.4.0.1 makes it easier to create and edit questionnaires thanks to new useful features.

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Development: Java EE, COBOL, and RcppArmadillo

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:29
  • Oracle Wants to Open Up Java EE

    Java Enterprise Edition could be leaving the tight control of Oracle and moving to an Open Source Foundation (maybe).

    Sure Java on the client side has had open-source options and sure they has been the Java Community Process (JCP) as well - But what about Java EE?

    Oracle is now openly talking about moving the Java EE process to a more open model that could include moving the whole model to a third party open source foundation.

  • Oracle Is Looking To Offload Java EE To A New Steward

    Oracle is looking to move Java EE off into an open foundation for future development.

    Oracle continues developing Java EE 8 as the Enterprise Edition with the official release expected before the end of the year, but following that, they are looking to move Java EE into some existing foundation to steward the project moving forward.

  • Don't hate COBOL until you've tried it

    COBOL is the Rodney Dangerfield of programming languages—it doesn't get any respect. It is routinely denigrated for its verbosity and dismissed as archaic. Yet COBOL is far from a dead language. It processes an estimated 85% of all business transactions, and 5 billion lines of new COBOL code are written every year.

    I worked for 10 years as a COBOL programmer, and I don't think it's quite as bad as its reputation would lead one to believe. In fact, it's quite good at handling currency and fixed-format records. But COBOL does have its quirks, many of them rooted in the computing environments of the early days of programming. This is a story of how a punch card ate my program.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.960.1.0

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Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, Red Hat, and the Latest FUD From Black Duck

Fri, 2017-08-18 23:25

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OpenGL vs. Vulkan On The AMD Ryzen 3

Fri, 2017-08-18 19:17

We have previously looked at Vulkan vs. OpenGL Linux game CPU core scaling and Linux game scaling across multiple CPUs but at the time did not have a Ryzen 3 system. Now having Ryzen 3 Linux box, here is a look at how the Vulkan versus OpenGL performance compares on the low-end processor. As well, it's a fresh look at the NVIDIA vs. RadeonSI/RADV performance.

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Chakra Linux: Its Own Beast, Its Own Beauty

Fri, 2017-08-18 19:14

There are so many Linux distributions available—so many, in fact, that it can become a bit of a challenge to find the one right for you. After you’ve looked at them enough, it seems the variations tend to blur together, such that one flavor of Linux is only a slight shift away from another.

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Debian GNU/Linux Running On Mobile Devices Like PocketCHIP, Samsung Galaxy, ZeroPhone, & Pyra

Fri, 2017-08-18 19:10

Debian is also called the universal operating system as it is used as a base for hundreds of Linux distributions. So, this claim also underlines that Debian should run on mobile devices too–right? Well, Debian developers are continuously working to add support for new devices and adapt it as per hardware and GUI capabilities of different devices.

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Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 5

Fri, 2017-08-18 19:02

Big update today and probably a very awaited one: here is an important step on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. Let’s get the new Ubuntu Dock installed by default! For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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5 Best Vector Graphics Editors for Linux

Fri, 2017-08-18 18:34

Here's a list of the best vector graphics software for Linux that can be used as Adobe Illustrator alternative for Linux.

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Oracle changes heart on Java EE

Fri, 2017-08-18 12:52
  • Oracle opens up Java EE

    Oracle continues to make progress Java EE 8, the enterprise edition for the Java platform, and moving forward it would like to advance Java EE within a more open and collaborative community. Specifications are nearly complete and the Java team expects to deliver the Java EE 8 reference implementation this summer.

    As the delivery of Java EE 8 approaches, Oracle believes they have the ability to rethink how Java EE is developed in order to “make it more agile and responsive to changing industry and technology demands.”

  • Oracle considers moving Java EE to an open source foundation

    With the finalization of the Java EE 8 platform on the horizon, Oracle on Thursday said it's considering moving Java Enterprise Edition technologies to an open source foundation.

    The move, Oracle said in a blog post, "may be the right next step, in order to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing, and change the governance process."

  • Oracle doesn't want Java EE any more

    Oracle wants to end its leadership in the development of enterprise Java and is looking for an open source foundation to take on the role.

    The company said today that the upcoming Java EE (Enterprise Edition) 8 presents an opportunity to rethink how the platform is developed. Although development is done via open source with community participation, the current Oracle-led process is not seen agile, flexible, or open enough. ”We believe that moving Java EE technologies to an open source foundation may be the right next step, to adopt more agile processes, implement more flexible licensing and change the governance process,” Oracle said in a statement.

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Security: Trezor, Kaspersky and Secure [sic] Enclave Processor

Fri, 2017-08-18 12:48

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Linux-loving lecturer 'lost' email, was actually confused by Outlook

Fri, 2017-08-18 11:07

ON-CALL Friday means a few things at El Reg: a new BOFH. A couple of beers. And another instalment of On-Call, our weekly column in which we take reader-contributed tales of being asked to do horrible things for horrible people, scrub them up and hope you click.

This week, meet “Newt” who a dozen or more years ago worked at a College that “decided to migrate from a Linux system to Microsoft Outlook with an Exchange back end.”

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