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Control Plane Engineering Is Key for Big Kubernetes Deployments

LXer - Thu, 2017-02-16 04:21
If you’re interested in running a complex Kubernetes system across several different cloud environments, you should check out what Bob Wise and his team at Samsung SDS call “Control Plane Engineering.” Wise, during his keynote at CloudNativeCon last year, explained the concept of building a system that sits on top of the server nodes to ensure better uptime and performance across multiple clouds, creates a deployment that’s easily scaled by the ClusterOps team, and covers long-running cluster requirements.

Getting Started with LDAP

Reddit - Thu, 2017-02-16 04:16

Hi

I want to incorporate more Linux machines into my network, but I am having a hard time managing them. I want them to be set up where they have domain/network logins like windows and I found out about LDAP. I found a server OS that was supposed to do the trick called Univention Corporate Server which can be found here and it states that it can handle Windows and Linux machines, I have had a very hard time using it. I have not been able to attach any Linux machine to it. If anybody knows how to help get me started with this, any help would be appreciated.

submitted by /u/sysadmin84
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The Basics: Explaining Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and Docker Swarm

LinuxToday - Thu, 2017-02-16 04:00

The IT world is turning to containers, but to control them you need container management programs.

Running Manjaro Linux w/ KDE Plasma; Need Help With Multiple Monitors with Different DPIs

Reddit - Thu, 2017-02-16 03:34

Howdy!

I'm running Manjaro Linux with KDE Plasma. I have two monitors, one with 1x DPI and a second one that's 4K and needs to be scaled 1.5x. Windows handles this beautifully but I've been struggling to get this working right on my Linux setup.

The first monitor is 3440 x 1440 but is physically large and is scaled at 1x. It's basically like 1080p in terms of scaling.

The second monitor is 3840 x 2160 (4k) and should be scaled at 1.5x.

Right now Manjaro ships with X11, I believe. Now, my understanding is that X11 isn't capable of doing multiple DPIs and I would need to install Wayland.

My question is, will Wayland provide me with what I'm looking for? Is it mature enough to work with KDE Plasma? If so, how do I do it? Any guides, videos, or reference material anyone could provide me?

submitted by /u/dantheman213
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What happens when we just assume positive intent?

LXer - Thu, 2017-02-16 03:07
I never make New Year's resolutions. I've never understood the concept, never felt motivated to change with the calendar, and always been cynical of the effectiveness of "resolving" to change.Instead, I like to continually examine my habits and think about how I can improve on a more frequent basis. That said, 2016 has been an interesting year, and the beginning of 2017 I think is a good opportunity to think about how to be intentional about my behavior in all aspects of my life.read more

MPV 0.24 Media Player Adds Experimental Stream Recording, X11 Pseudo HiDPI Scaling

Phoronix - Thu, 2017-02-16 02:26
MPV Player, the popular fork of MPlayer/MPlayer2, is out this week with a significant feature update...

Is X really that awfull?

Reddit - Thu, 2017-02-16 02:07

Seems like everyone & his grandmother wants to see X vanish in favour of Wayland these days. I am not watching that debate very actively, but I can't be to notice that threads and articles pop up like mushrooms after reign with "this or that on wayland".

As much as I understand there is some technical critique of X11, but a lot seems to usually boil down to X is old, we need something new. Personally I found X11 to be a 30 year old project 30 years ahead of it's time. When I took some CS classes at university back in 2000, it was a bliss to be able to sitt at my computer at home and just ssh to Solaris at the school instead of sharing same hot rum with 25 other people behind small 14" screens. I just imagine now if we could have X clients runing on TVs and phones being able to log in to our linux computers and display stuff on TV screens directly from linux.

Instead we are reinventing protocols and have to spend $$ on hardware (chromecasts & co for example) to be able to do this. I have read Unix haters book some many moons ago, and while I did found it amuzing, I just didn't recognize myself in most of X11 (or Unix) critique, just as I don't recognize myself today in most of critiques of X11 and I did some OpenGL and X11 programmigng back in days.

I won't go into technicalities, but do we really have to reinvent wheel all the time and rewrite everything from scratch, instead of improving what we already have. I am quite sure there are pecularities and problems with X11, but to me concepts it builds on seems to be sound. Not to be disrespectfull or to diminish anyone, I am very gratefull for all the Open Source software I use on everyday basis, but that just something I was wondering about lately and am interesting to hear what other think about the issue.

submitted by /u/arthurno1
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Using Scripting Languages in IoT: Challenges and Approaches

LXer - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:52
Scripting languages (aka Very High-Level Languages or VHLLs), such as Python, PHP, and JavaScript are commonly used in desktop, server, and web development. And, their powerful built-in functionality lets you develop small useful applications with little time and effort, says Paul Sokolovsky, IoT engineer at Linaro. However, using VHLLs for deeply embedded development is a relatively recent twist in IoT.

today's leftovers

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:26

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Desktop GNU/Linux

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:25
  • Munich's great Linux desktop initiative may end [Ed: Misleading summary - if not altogether factually incorrect - from Microsoft Peter and now Andy Patrizio. Is Microsoft giving them marching orders? Longtime Microsoft propagandist Patrizio helps his bosses with Munich FUD.]
  • Munich May Ditch Linux Desktops For Windows [Ed: "End of an era," it says. No. It's not. It hasn't even been decided yet. Old tactics again...]
  • Chromium OS – Exton Build 170212 – with YouTube and Spotify working fast and responsive

    The difference between Chromium OS and Google Chrome OS
    Chromium OS is the open source project, used primarily by developers, with code that is available for anyone to checkout, modify, and build. Google Chrome OS is the Google product that OEMs ship on Chromebooks for general consumer use.

  • Should you run Linux without a desktop environment?

    One of the best things about Linux is that there is a wide variety of desktop environments available to choose from for your computer. But not everybody uses a desktop environment like GNOME, Unity, etc. Some folks prefer to skip them entirely, for various reasons.

    A redditor recently asked about Linux users who skip desktop environments, and he got some interesting answers.

  • Ukuu Makes it Easy to Install Mainline Kernel on Ubuntu

    Ever wondered how to install new kernel releases on Ubuntu? Using Ukuu (which stands for ‘Ubuntu Kernel Update Utility’) is one way to do it. This straightforward desktop app help you install a new kernel in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and other Ubuntu-based distributions, using the “mainline” kernels published by Canonical.

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Leftovers: Software and Games

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:22
  • Flatpak 0.8.3 Released, Can Now Work With NVIDIA's Linux Driver

    With the release of Flatpak 0.8.3, this open-source sandboxing tech is a bit more suited for Linux gaming.

  • Video calls for Signal now in public beta

    This represents an entirely new calling infrastructure for Signal, and should increase voice call quality as well. We think it's a big improvement, but we're rolling it out in stages to collect feedback from people with different devices, networks, and regions in order to ensure there are no surprises when it's enabled for everyone by default.

  • Vivaldi 1.8 Browser Enters Development, Lets You Create Notes with Drag and Drop

    While some of you are enjoying their new Vivaldi 1.7 web browser with its built-in screenshot tool, it looks like the Vivaldi developers have started working on the next major update, Vivaldi 1.8.

    Vivaldi's Pål Andreas Franksson had the pleasure of announcing the availability of Vivaldi Snapshot 1.8.755.3, the first development release in the new series, which implements a bunch of new features and improvements that some of you have requested lately.

  • Unreal Engine 4.15 Brings Nintendo Switch Support, 50% Faster C++ Compile Times

    Epic Games, through Alexander Paschall, proudly announced today the general availability of Unreal Engine 4.15 game engine for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Packed with almost 80 improvements that have been added numerous contributors from all over the world during three months, Unreal Engine 4.15 is adding a lot of exciting new features, starting with support for the Nintendo Switch gaming console and continuing with faster C++ compile times, reduced by 50 percent.

  • Wednesday Madness, a few good Linux gaming deals going on

    Every Wednesday, I shall highlight some deals you might be interested in if you’re running a little low on funds.

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Intel Goes Ahead & Drops i915 Driver From OpenGL 2.1 To 1.4 By Default

Phoronix - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:21
Intel Linux developers have partially reverted Mesa work done years ago to drop the default OpenGL behavior with the older i915 driver from exposing OpenGL 2.0+ support to now only having OpenGL 1.4 out-of-the-box...

Android Leftovers

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:17

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Leftovers: OSS

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:10
  • Open Source Accessibility Tools Help Streamline Inclusive Development

    IBM is embarking on a new era of open source accessibility by releasing tooling, samples and design patterns to help streamline the development of inclusive web and mobile applications.

    IBM has released two new projects on the developerWorks/open community, AccProbe and Va11yS, to help alleviate accessibility roadblocks during the agile development process, strengthen the user experience by adhering to industry standards, and reduce costs by ensuring accessibility is done right from the beginning.

  • Software-Defined Storage Opens Up: 10 Projects to Know

    Throughout 2016, the SDS (Software-Defined Storage) category achieved many new milestones and became increasingly tied to successful cloud deployments. With SDS, organizations can manage policy-based provisioning and management of data storage independent of the underlying hardware. They can also deploy free and open source SDS solutions. Many people are familiar with Ceph and are leveraging it within their OpenStack deployments, but Ceph is far from the only relevant open source SDS project.

  • What Is Open Source Software?
  • Interview: Cloud Foundry on its 2017 awareness-raising plans for open source PaaS

    The Cloud Foundry was originally developed in-house at VMware before being handed over to EMC/VMware spin-off Pivotal Software, which, in February 2014, put in motion a plan to establish an open governance model for the PaaS. This, in turn, paved the way for the foundation to be established in January 2015.

  • Control Plane Engineering Is Key for Big Kubernetes Deployments

    If you’re interested in running a complex Kubernetes system across several different cloud environments, you should check out what Bob Wise and his team at Samsung SDS call “Control Plane Engineering.”

    Wise, during his keynote at CloudNativeCon last year, explained the concept of building a system that sits on top of the server nodes to ensure better uptime and performance across multiple clouds, creates a deployment that’s easily scaled by the ClusterOps team, and covers long-running cluster requirements.

  • Intro to Control Plane Engineering by Bob Wise, Samsung SDS

    Large, high-performance and reliable Kubernetes clusters require engineering the control plane components for demands beyond the defaults. This talk covers the relationship between the various components that make up the Kubernetes control plane and how to design and size those components.

  • Try out Firefox on Wayland easily

    Today I finally managed to compile and run a Firefox version, which was patched to work on Wayland natively. To achieve this, I used the forked and enhanced Firefox version of the Red Hat developer Martin Stransky.

    For all those who are unaware of the Wayland project, it’s an succesor to the very old, but still common X display server for Linux operating systems. Compared to X, Wayland is a lot smaller in its code base, written from scratch, far more secure and build up on the newest 3D graphic driver stack. Unfortunately not all big Linux applications support it yet. The work on Wayland compatibility for Firefox was already requested some years ago and it was not moving forward very fast. Fortunately, some days ago it looks like the first patches have been merged into master.

  • It's Now Easier Trying Firefox Wayland Support On Arch Linux & Flatpak Distributions

    Jonas Heinrich took to a Firefox branch maintained by Red Hat developer Martin Stransky to getting it working on Arch Linux, getting the Firefox build into an AUR repository, and also producing a Flatpak build of the Wayland-patched Firefox.

    With his firefox-wayland-git package via AUR, Firefox can run without any usage of XWayland. This is as upstream Firefox continues getting closer to landing all of the Wayland support upstream so it will be an out-of-the-box experience in the hopefully not too distant future.

  • RethinkDB Resurfaces With Linux Foundation

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has bought the source code to the recently mothballed RethinkDB NoSQL JSON database. It relicensed the code under the Apache License, and contributed it to The Linux Foundation.

    As we reported recently, the news was announced in October that after more than seven years of development, the company behind RethinkDB was shutting down, although RethinkDB and Horizon would continue to be available, distributed under open source licenses.

  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Fourth Quarter 2016
  • FreeBSD 12 Looking At Dropping SVR4 Binary Compatibility

    FreeBSD has long had a SVR4 (System V Release 4) compatibility layer, but FreeBSD 12 will likely do away with this support.

    Is anyone still making use of UNIX System V R4 binaries on FreeBSD? The System V Release from the late 80's... The FreeBSD developers have been trying to find out if anyone is still serious about using SVR4 binary compatibility on FreeBSD, but so far they haven't been able to find parties that are still truly caring.

  • How and Why to do Open Source Compliance Training at Your Company

    Education and communication are two essential building blocks in any open source software compliance program. Both help ensure that employees, as well as others outside the organization, possess a good understanding of the organization’s policies governing the use of open source software.

    Employee training serves as a venue to publicize and promote the compliance policy and processes within the organization and to foster a culture of compliance.

  • [Older] Open Standards and Open Source in Telecom

    “Open standards” and “open source” are two terms that can often be confused. While regular readers of this blog are likely able to differentiate, for clarification’s sake, open source is the term used for software when the original source code is freely available and can also be redistributed and modified. But it doesn’t just reference access to the source code – distribution terms of open source software must comply with its own set of criteria.

    When telecommunications was in its infancy, standards were needed and established before any technology was released. As the development of new networks and technology grows, it will mean prototypes in open source, collaborative projects, which are challenges that we’ve discussed in a previous blog post. The development of new internet-enabled mobile devices and internet service providers have brought telecommunications to the forefront, as well as trends towards cooperation between the Open Standards and Open Source communities, as previously highlighted in our blog about the need for collaboration in mobile security.

read more

Development News

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:08
  • Using Scripting Languages in IoT: Challenges and Approaches

    Scripting languages (aka Very High-Level Languages or VHLLs), such as Python, PHP, and JavaScript are commonly used in desktop, server, and web development. And, their powerful built-in functionality lets you develop small useful applications with little time and effort, says Paul Sokolovsky, IoT engineer at Linaro. However, using VHLLs for deeply embedded development is a relatively recent twist in IoT.

  • Things Every Hacker Once Knew

    One fine day in January 2017 I was reminded of something I had half-noticed a few times over the previous decade. That is, younger hackers don’t know the bit structure of ASCII and the meaning of the odder control characters in it.

    This is knowledge every fledgling hacker used to absorb through their pores. It’s nobody’s fault this changed; the obsolescence of hardware terminals and the near-obsolescence of the RS-232 protocol is what did it. Tools generate culture; sometimes, when a tool becomes obsolete, a bit of cultural commonality quietly evaporates. It can be difficult to notice that this has happened.

    This document is a collection of facts about ASCII and related technologies, notably hardware serial terminals and RS-232 and modems. This is lore that was at one time near-universal and is no longer. It’s not likely to be directly useful today - until you trip over some piece of still-functioning technology where it’s relevant (like a GPS puck), or it makes sense of some old-fart war story. Even so, it’s good to know anyway, for cultural-literacy reasons.

  • Futhark: A Pure, Functional Language For GPU Computing

    Futhark was presented earlier this month at FOSDEM as a "purely functional array language" with its compiler able to "efficiently generate high-performance GPU code."

    Futhark is a high-level, parallel-focused programming language that aims to compete with the performance of hand-written code targeting particular GPUs. Futhark hopes to be more portable across GPUs while tapping into the full GPU potential if you were writing finely-tuned code targeting a particular graphics processor. Futhark's compiler currently translates this code into OpenCL for GPU execution, but I'm told by one of the attendees at FOSDEM for this event, Futhark is also working on an approach to turn their code into pure-OpenGL for execution on GPUs without OpenCL, CUDA, or Vulkan.

read more

Security Leftovers

TuxMachines - Thu, 2017-02-16 01:06
  • Re-thinking Web App Security

    The implications of storing your data locally are quite profound.

  • ASLR^CACHE Attack Defeats Address Space Layout Randomization

    Researchers from VUSec found a way to break ASLR via an MMU sidechannel attack that even works in JavaScript. Does this matter? Yes, it matters. A lot. The discovery of this security flaw along with the practical implementation is really important mainly because of two factors: what it means for ASLR to be broken and how the MMU sidechannel attack works inside the processor.

  • The Biggest Risk with Container Security is Not Containers

    Container security may be a hot topic today, but we’re failing to recognize lessons from the past. As an industry our focus is on the containerization technology itself and how best to secure it, with the underlying logic that if the technology is itself secure, then so too will be the applications hosted.

    Unfortunately, the reality is that few datacenter attacks are focused on compromising the container framework. Yes, such attacks do exist, but the priority for malicious actors is mounting an attack on applications and data; increasingly for monetary reasons. According to SAP, more than 80 percent of all cyberattacks are specifically targeting software applications rather than the network.

read more

Munich City Government to Dump Linux Desktop

LinuxInsider - Thu, 2017-02-16 00:59
Munich city officials turned lots of heads 10 years ago, when they voted to swap out Microsoft Windows with LiMux -- a custom desktop version of the Linux operating system, based on Ubuntu Linux. The current municipal government wants to dump LiMux and replace its 15,000 computers with Windows 10. The city's general council this week voted to investigate how much time and money it will take to build a Windows 10 client for use by the city's employees. The city spent millions of euros over the last decade on the Windows replacement project.

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