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How a town uses an open source tool for collaboration and managing large files

LXer - Tue, 2017-09-19 13:12
Like many organizations, governments and townships are confronting challenges that involve collaboration and sharing of large files. In today's age of widespread cloud adoption, public institutions may be tempted to view public cloud storage as a simple, low-cost solution to managing data; however, significant concerns persist around security, data protection liability, control, and platform/vendor lock-in.read more

Programming: OpenJ9, SCons, and Adafruit NeoPixel Stick

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 13:04
  • Some Early Tests Of The Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine

    With IBM's newly open-sourced J9 Java Virtual Machine as the Eclipse OpenJ9, I've run some quick benchmarks to get an idea how its performance is comparing to the de facto Java Virtual Machine, Hotspot.

  • SCons 3.0 Released

    For those that haven't jumped fully on the Meson build system bandwagon, the SCons 3.0 software construction utility is now available.

  • Small Glowing Thing

    Quite a while ago I obtained an Adafruit NeoPixel Stick. It was cheap enough to be an impulse buy but it took me some time to get around to actually doing something with it.

    I’ve been wanting to play a little more with the ATtiny range of microcontrollers so these things seemed to go together nicely. It turns out that getting an ATtiny programmed is actually rather simple using an Arduino as an ISP programmer. I’ve written up some notes on the procedure at the 57North Hacklab wiki.

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Kernel: Next Linux kernel 4.13 RC, the Linux Foundation and Graphics News

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 13:02
  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux Kernel 4.14, the Next LTS Release

    A day early than expected, Linux creator Linus Torvalds cautiously kicked off the development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series, which looks to be the next LTS (Long Term Support) branch, with the first Release Candidate (RC) milestone.

    That's right, two weeks after the release of Linux kernel 4.13, which is currently the most stable and advanced kernel series, being adopted by more and more GNU/Linux distributions each day, the first RC development snapshot of Linux kernel 4.14 is ready for public testing, officially closing the merge window. And it looks like some core new functionality will be implemented in this release.

  • Linux Foundation wants to promote sustainable open source development with new initiatives

    During last week’s Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles, the Linux Foundation announced a series of projects designed to promote sustainability and growth in open source development.

    We wrote last week about their “Open Source Guides for the Enterprise,” which will see a series of guides by professionals from many different organizations released over the next few months.

    Following that, the foundation announced the Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software, or CHAOSS, project. With CHAOSS, the Linux Foundation wants to provide a platform for measuring and analyzing open source projects.

    The foundation also announced that it has granted a CII security badge to 100 projects through a voluntary process for open source projects to prove their security measures stack up professionally.

  • Intel ANV Lands New Vulkan 1.0.61 Extensions, Android Prep Support
  • AMDGPU Increasing Fragment Size For Performance

    Christian König of AMD yesterday sent out an AMDGPU kernel patch for boosting the default fragment size for GCN graphics cards pre-Vega.

    The patch is quite trivial and is for boosting the default fragment size from 64KB to 2MB, similar to the move made with the latest Vega GPUs. This change is for GFX6/GFX7/GFX8 graphics processors or basically all the GCN cards prior to Vega "GFX9".

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VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly

LinuxToday - Tue, 2017-09-19 13:00

The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends

Debian: Tails 3.2 RC, Debian Policy, and Mini-DebConf 2017 Conference

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 12:54
  • Tails 3.2 release candidate has been released for testing

    The LiveUSB Linux distribution, Tails (the amnesic incognito live system), has received a new release candidate for the upcoming 3.2 update that’s due out on the 26th of this month. The update comes with some big under-the-hood changes to the system which should improve hardware support and the email experience.

    If you’ve ever decided to try Tails on newer hardware, you may have had some driver issues; with this release, Tails ships with the Linux 4.12.12 kernel which is one of the latest. With it, users will get a better hardware experience; for example, the NVIDIA Maxwell series of graphics cards are now supported.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- September 2017
  • Mini-DebConf 2017 Debian Conference to Take Place November 23-26 in Cambridge UK

    Debian developer and leader of the debian-cd project Steve McIntyre announced the official dates and schedule of this year's Mini-DebConf conference for Debian developers and users.

    The Mini-DebConf 2017 conference will take place for four days, from Thursday, November 23 until Sunday, November 26, and it will be hosted at Arm's office in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Arm is Steve McIntyre's employer and the industry's leading supplier of microprocessors for embedded and IoT devices.

    "I'm organizing another mini-DebConf in Cambridge this year. Again, my employer Arm is going to host the conference for four days in November," said Steve McIntyre in the mailing list announcement. "I'm also hoping to find sponsors again to cover some other costs for the conference for things like food - please contact me if you can help!"

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Early Linux 4.14 Kernel Benchmarks Are Looking Promising

Phoronix - Tue, 2017-09-19 12:26
I've begun running some Linux 4.14-rc1 kernel benchmarks and in some areas there appears to be nice gains with this in-development kernel...

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 12:16
  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly

    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update.

    We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.

  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched

    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8.

    The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

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Clang-Refactor Tool Lands In Clang Codebase

Phoronix - Tue, 2017-09-19 12:16
The clang-refactor tool is now living within the LLVM Clang SVN/Git codebase...

SCons 3.0 Released

Phoronix - Tue, 2017-09-19 12:08
For those that haven't jumped fully on the Meson build system bandwagon, the SCons 3.0 software construction utility is now available...

5 Raspberry Pi Alternatives to Build Your Own Small Computer

LXer - Tue, 2017-09-19 11:57
The Raspberry Pi is not the only single board computer available. There are several others that are worth a look. Check out these Raspberry Pi alternatives.

AMDGPU Increasing Fragment Size For Performance

Phoronix - Tue, 2017-09-19 11:56
Christian König of AMD yesterday sent out an AMDGPU kernel patch for boosting the default fragment size for GCN graphics cards pre-Vega...

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 11:37
  • Spy Files Russia

    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia.

    While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.

  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month

    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month.

    CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month.

    Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.

  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

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Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 11:20
  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC

    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.

  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen

    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.

  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD

    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.

  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years

    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.

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Can Artful Aardvark Regain Ubuntu's Popularity on the Desktop?

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 11:03

The upcoming Artful Aardvark release marks Ubuntu's return to GNOME as its desktop environment. After seven years, Unity will be abandoned, along with plans for a single desktop for all devices and the replacement of the X window system with Mir.

According to Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu's founder, these changes are being made in the hopes of making profitable Canonical, Ubuntu's governing company, and to allow Canonical to focus on its server and OpenStack business. However, to desktop users, the more pressing issue is whether these changes can help Ubuntu regain its domination of the desktop.

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Ethical Hacking Distro Parrot Security Gets ZFS Support, It's Based on Debian 10

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 11:01

Parrot Security OS, the security-oriented GNU/Linux distribution designed with IoT (Internet of Things) security, ethical hacking, and cloud-based penetration testing in mind, has been updated recently to version 3.8.

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Google Code-in 2017 lets students win prizes while learning about open source

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 10:58

Open source is changing the world, and it is important that children get educated on the subject as early as possible. Its a competitive workforce out there, and students need to be prepared. Of course, learning about open source doesn't have to be a chore -- gaining knowledge can sometimes be fun too.

Google does a lot for the open source community -- far more than just contributing code. Actually, the search giant hosts two very important education-focused open source events -- "Google Code-in" for younger teen students and "Google Summer of Code" for University-level learners. Today, the company announces the 8th annual edition of the former -- Google Code-in 2017. Not only can these teens gain experience by working on an open source project, but they can also win prizes!

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How a town uses an open source tool for collaboration and managing large files

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 10:56

The internationally renowned ski resort village of Megève, France, uses open source to manage increasing volumes of data while also making it more easily accessible. Located in the French Alps, Megève welcomes more than 80,000 visitors annually as the host of multiple concerts, cultural, and sporting events, including the Tour de France. With more than 300 employees, the city’s IT department manages more than 220 workstations, 40 virtual servers, and 60 switches connected to its network.

Sharing and collaborating on digital files is vital to all aspects of daily work in Megève. Many city departments must share files securely with external partners, particularly the communication department, which produces a great amount of content for tourists. This material includes large files such as models, final proofs, and photo libraries, which must be exchanged with designers, printers, and other partners. Similarly, architect firms working on calls for town planning projects routinely transfer files such as 3D plans, which can exceed 40+GB in size.

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postmarketOS: An Ultimate Linux Distro For Your Smartphones Is Coming

TuxMachines - Tue, 2017-09-19 10:51

One of the key strengths of Linux-based operating systems is their ability to run on a variety of hardware, ranging from a decade old computers to the latest generation Intel chips. The kernel developers work day and night to keep our devices breathing running. In the past, we have also prepared a list of Linux distributions that are best suited for older computers with limited hardware requirements.

This brings us to the question — Why aren’t tons of Linux operating system options available for mobile devices? The mobile ecosystem is chiefly dominated by Android and iOS, with Android enjoying a presence on a wide range of devices. But, on the fronts of updates, even Android fails to deliver. Very often the top-of-the-line flagship devices are deprived of the latest updates just after 2-3 years. To solve this question, postmarketOS has appeared on the horizon.

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