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What Drew Me to Solus?

TuxMachines - Sun, 2016-10-23 16:56

I’ve been using Windows since Windows 95 until the current version, Windows 10 but nn personal usage, I am not using any Windows operating system since Windows Vista. I have enough with Windows and fully switch to Ubuntu since 2010. I started with Ubuntu for a couple of releases till I fed up with it’s release cycle that i need to update distro by re-installing the it in every 6 months. Most of Linux enthusiast will advise me to stick with Long Term Support releases if I do not want to keep updating the OS. Somehow I am the person who constantly chasing for the latest software which the open source world is able to provide to the end user.

Also: Solus 1.2.1 Shannon Released

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Ubuntu's Additional Drivers tool: Would it be a bad idea for a DE to implement a similar feature?

Reddit - Sun, 2016-10-23 16:23

Like Gnome Software, for example. Handling packages, flatpaks and updates for different distributions.

Has any DE considered a GUI tool similar to additional drivers? If not, what is stopping them from doing it? Let me rephrase, is it impossible, in the technical term, to have it handle different packages, detection and so on for different distributions? (RPM/Deb/...)

Installing necessary drivers is probably one of the most common issues for many Linux users. I'm really curious to know why this hasn't been considered by any of the most popular DEs, such as Gnome and KDE.

submitted by /u/BishamonX
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Netflix on Firefox for Linux

LXer - Sun, 2016-10-23 16:14
If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround.

Elementary OS 0.4 LOKI is one of the best distro based on Ubuntu & better too

TuxMachines - Sun, 2016-10-23 16:00

Elementary OS 0.4 LOKI was released on last month 09 Sep, 2016 almost one and half year of development, after succeeds Freya which was released in April of 2015. Elementary OS 0.4 LOKI based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Long Term Support).

Elementary is one of the beautiful Linux distribution based on Ubuntu LTS release with power of Pantheon flagship desktop environment. Loki is clean, elegant, polish, perfect and best designed Linux distributions for beginners, Mac & windows users, it looks similar to Mac OS.

The previous release of elementary OS Freya was downloaded more than 1.2 million times, which is the biggest achievement on FOSS as per elementary founder, Daniel Foré reports.

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LLGL Aims To Be Abstraction Layer For OpenGL, Direct3D 11/12 & Vulkan

Phoronix - Sun, 2016-10-23 15:46
One of my "hobbies" when news is light and there isn't any fun/new/exciting hardware keeping me busy on a given weekend is checking out the various Vulkan projects on GitHub. It's been great seeing all of the independent graphics renderers/engines being tried by different individuals, tons of different Vulkan samples, and a lot of other innovative projects around Vulkan, many of which I've written about in the past few months on Phoronix. One of the projects I see being regularly updated when checking on weekends and haven't written about yet is LLGL, the Low-Level Graphics Library...

"LRNG" Patches Posted To Implement New /dev/random For Linux 4.9

Phoronix - Sun, 2016-10-23 15:22
Earlier this year patches were posted for a new /dev/random implementation for the Linux kernel dubbed LRNG -- simply, the Linux Random Number Generator. The LRNG work has yet to be merged in the mainline kernel but the code has now been updated for Linux 4.9...

KDE Applications 16.12 Release Schedule Ratified

Phoronix - Sun, 2016-10-23 15:10
The KDE developer community has firmed up the schedule for the KDE Applications 16.12 release...

Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Phoronix - Sun, 2016-10-23 15:00
This weekend I pulled out a Core i5 powered HP EliteBook that served as Intel's Software Development Vehicle for Sandy Bridge. I hadn't touched this laptop in a long time but decided to see how the current Linux + Mesa graphics stack on Ubuntu 16.10 compares to the older Linux distributions when Sandy Bridge hardware was more relevant...

MySQL and database programming for beginners

LinuxToday - Sun, 2016-10-23 15:00

MySQL's community manager shares tips and resources for beginners and previews his All Things Open talk.

Kali linux login loop?!

Reddit - Sun, 2016-10-23 13:52

Well here's the problem. I was in my non-root acc and i was watching YouTube after a while i decided to start my deluge to fix some preferences of it. Suddenly my computer lags and a black screen appears then it shows again the login screen I try to log back in and it shows my desktop (wallpaper black) and it throws me again to the login screen. The other 2 acc i have work like charm. I don't wanna delete the acc because I have spend hours configuring it. (deluge = torrent - kali = debian like distro) Thanks in advance.

submitted by /u/superCalculator
[link] [comments]

How OpenStack keeps its summits safe and welcoming

LXer - Sun, 2016-10-23 13:01
The great promise of a global open source software project like OpenStack is that it can bring together the best and the brightest from all around the world to together create something far greater than any one person, company, or nation could do on its own.

Mhddfs - Combine Several Smaller Partition into One Large Virtual Storage

LinuxToday - Sun, 2016-10-23 13:00

 tecmint: mhddfs is a driver for Linux that combines several mount points into one virtual disk.

Security News

TuxMachines - Sun, 2016-10-23 12:58
  • Friday's security updates
  • World’s first hack-proof Wi-Fi router with open source firmware is here

    Turris Omnia WiFi Router, the world’s first hack-proof router with open source firmware launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic.

  • Open-source hack-proof router aims to close cyber security gap

    Routers are the gateway of every home internet network. Yet, while many computers run antivirus software, little has been done thus far to protect routers against cyber threats. A new device, described as the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched on Thursday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague.

    The main strength of the Turris Omnia router, a spin-out of a cyber security research project by Czech Republic’s domain administrator NIC.cz, is the fact that it automatically updates and patches vulnerabilities as they become known.

  • Adding a phone number to your Google account can make it LESS secure.

    Recently, account takeovers, email hacking, and targeted phishing attacks have been all over the news. Hacks of various politicians, allegedly carried out by Russian hackers, have yielded troves of data. Despite the supposed involvement of state-sponsored agents, some hacks were not reliant on complex zero-day attacks, but involved social engineering unsuspecting victims. These kinds of attacks are increasingly likely to be used against regular people. This recently happened to a friend of mine:

    Two weeks ago, an ex-colleague (actually, my officemate at Google way back in 2002) — let’s call him Bob — had his Google account compromised while on vacation in Hawaii. With his primary email account compromised, the attacker could have:

  • “Dirty COW”, the most dangerous Linux Bug for the last 9 years

    Red Hat, the leading open source software developer firm, has revealed that Linux Kernel has been infected with a serious bug for the past 9 years. The bug has been dubbed as Dirty Cow. It is deemed dangerous because through this bug, an attacker can get write access to read-only memory.

  • Serious Dirty COW bug leaves millions of Linux users vulnerable to attack
  • Rigging the Election

    When Dorothy discovers fraud in the land of Oz, she is told by the Wizard, "Don't look behind the curtain." But she does. In America, we demand truth and accountability in so many aspects of our daily lives, and yet somehow there's little public outcry for transparency within voting, the sacred cornerstone of our democracy. For the most part, we sleep soundly under the blanket of assurances from government officials. FBI Director James Comey even attempted a spin of irony recently, noting that our "clunky" voting process actually makes wholesale rigging more difficult. However, Comey misses the bigger picture.


    Hardly anyone uses the same computer from 12 years ago, yet large sections of the country currently vote on aging electronic systems which utilize proprietary software that cannot be publicly examined. Unverifiable technology remains deployed in 29 states – including Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida – and other key battleground states, which may determine our next president. Races in these areas are not evidence based, and consequently, we cannot be certain ballots reflect voter intent. Bereft of such knowledge, how can we put faith in the legitimacy of our government?

  • Cyber attack: hackers 'weaponised' everyday devices with malware to mount assault

    The huge attack on global internet access, which blocked some of the world’s most popular websites, is believed to have been unleashed by hackers using common devices like webcams and digital recorders.

    Among the sites targeted on Friday were Twitter, Paypal and Spotify. All were customers of Dyn, an infrastructure company in New Hampshire in the US that acts as a switchboard for internet traffic.

    Outages were intermittent and varied by geography, but reportedly began in the eastern US before spreading to other parts of the country and Europe.

    Users complained they could not reach dozens of internet destinations, including Mashable, CNN, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Yelp and some businesses hosted by Amazon.

  • Homeland Security Is ‘Investigating All Potential Causes’ of Internet Disruptions

    Cyber attacks targeting a little known internet infrastructure company, Dyn, disrupted access to dozens of websites on Friday, preventing some users from accessing PayPal, Twitter and Spotify.

    It was not immediately clear who was responsible for the outages that began in the Eastern United States, and then spread to other parts of the country and Western Europe.

    The outages were intermittent, making it difficult to identify all the victims. But technology news site Gizmodo named some five dozen sites that were affected by the attack. They included CNN, HBO Now, Mashable, the New York Times, People.com, the Wall Street Journal and Yelp.

  • Blame the Internet of Things for Destroying the Internet Today

    A massive botnet of hacked Internet of Things devices has been implicated in the cyberattack that caused a significant internet outage on Friday.

    The botnet, which is powered by the malware known as Mirai, is in part responsible for the attack that intermittently knocked some popular websites offline, according to Level 3 Communications, one of the world’s largest internet backbone providers, and security firm Flashpoint.

    “We are seeing attacks coming from a number of different locations. We’re seeing attacks coming from an Internet of Things botnet that we identified called Mirai, also involved in this attack,” Dale Drew, chief security officer at Level 3 Communications, said on a livestream on Friday afternoon.

  • How to Understand Today’s Internet Outage in 4 Words

    A massive DDoS attack against a major DNS service likely using a botnet of IoT devices resulted in Internet issues across the eastern United States Friday, making it hard for many users to access their favorite sites.

    Phew. That’s a lot of acronyms.

  • IoT Can Never Be Fixed

    This title is a bit click baity, but it's true, not for the reason you think. Keep reading to see why.

    If you've ever been involved in keeping a software product updated, I mean from the development side of things, you know it's not a simple task. It's nearly impossible really. The biggest problem is that even after you've tested it to death and gone out of your way to ensure the update is as small as possible, things break. Something always breaks.

    If you're using a typical computer, when something breaks, you sit down in front of it, type away on the keyboard, and you fix the problem. More often than not you just roll back the update and things go back to the way they used to be.

  • Hacked Cameras, DVRs Powered Today’s Massive Internet Outage

    A massive and sustained Internet attack that has caused outages and network congestion today for a large number of Web sites was launched with the help of hacked “Internet of Things” (IoT) devices, such as CCTV video cameras and digital video recorders, new data suggests.

    Earlier today cyber criminals began training their attack cannons on Dyn, an Internet infrastructure company that provides critical technology services to some of the Internet’s top destinations. The attack began creating problems for Internet users reaching an array of sites, including Twitter, Amazon, Tumblr, Reddit, Spotify and Netflix.

  • How an army of vulnerable gadgets took down the web today

    At some point this morning, one of the US’s critical internet infrastructure players was hit with a staggering distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack that has taken out huge swaths of the web. Sites like Twitter, Netflix, Spotify, Reddit, and many others — all clients of a domain registration service provider called Dyn — have suffered crippling interruptions and, in some cases, blanket outages.

    Details are now emerging about the nature of the attack. It appears the cause is what’s known as a Mirai-based IoT botnet, according to security journalist Brian Krebs, who cited cyber-threat intelligence firm Flashpoint. Dyn’s chief strategy officer Kyle Owen, who spoke with reporters this afternoon, later confirmed Flashpoint’s claim, revealing that traffic to its servers was clogged with malicious requests from tens of millions of IP addresses in what the company is calling a "very sophisticated and complex attack."

  • Fixing the IoT isn't going to be easy

    A large part of the internet became inaccessible today after a botnet made up of IP cameras and digital video recorders was used to DoS a major DNS provider. This highlighted a bunch of things including how maybe having all your DNS handled by a single provider is not the best of plans, but in the long run there's no real amount of diversification that can fix this - malicious actors have control of a sufficiently large number of hosts that they could easily take out multiple providers simultaneously.

    To fix this properly we need to get rid of the compromised systems. The question is how. Many of these devices are sold by resellers who have no resources to handle any kind of recall. The manufacturer may not have any kind of legal presence in many of the countries where their products are sold. There's no way anybody can compel a recall, and even if they could it probably wouldn't help. If I've paid a contractor to install a security camera in my office, and if I get a notification that my camera is being used to take down Twitter, what do I do? Pay someone to come and take the camera down again, wait for a fixed one and pay to get that put up? That's probably not going to happen. As long as the device carries on working, many users are going to ignore any voluntary request.

  • Indiscreet Logs: Persistent Diffie-Hellman Backdoors in TLS

    Software implementations of discrete logarithm based cryptosystems over finite fields typically make the assumption that any domain parameters they are presented with are trustworthy, i.e., the parameters implement cyclic groups where the discrete logarithm problem is assumed to be hard. An informal and widespread justification for this seemingly exists that says validating parameters at run time is too computationally expensive relative to the perceived risk of a server sabotaging the privacy of its own connection. In this paper we explore this trust assumption and examine situations where it may not always be justified.

    We conducted an investigation of discrete logarithm domain parameters in use across the Internet and discovered evidence of a multitude of potentially backdoored moduli of unknown order in TLS and STARTTLS spanning numerous countries, organizations, and protocols. Although our disclosures resulted in a number of organizations taking down suspicious parameters, we argue the potential for TLS backdoors is systematic and will persist until either until better parameter hygiene is taken up by the community, or finite field based cryptography is eliminated altogether.

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Blockchain and FOSS

TuxMachines - Sun, 2016-10-23 12:57
  • R3 Finally Open Sources Blockchain Project, Admits Budget Difficulty

    One major criticism on private Blockchain development initiatives led by banks and financial institutions has been the ambiguity in the coding language and structure of permissioned ledgers. The R3 Consortium is attempting to neutralize it by open sourcing its technology.

    R3 Corda, a private Blockchain platform specifically developed for financial establishments with massive transactional volumes by R3CEV, is officially rendered open source by the consortium after over 70 of its member financial institutions came to a consensus in setting a standard for the Blockchain technology.

  • Blockchain-Fueled Open-Source P2P Energy Trading System Wins Energy Hackathon

    Following a weekend of solution seeking, collaboration and competition, the highlight of the Hackenergy 2016 event was a blockchain-fueled peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading system called EcoCoin, which grabbed top honors.

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Tizen News

TuxMachines - Sun, 2016-10-23 12:56
  • New details revealed about future Samsung QLED TVs

    Samsung has unveiled the latest details of his stunning, next-generation TV. Named SUHD Qualmark Red TV, it’s based on the proprietary technology Samsung has pioneered: QLED, long for Quantum dot Light-Emitting Diode.

    According to sources from Samsung Electronics, the product will cover the high-end spectrum of the market, proposing itself as the top premium TV produced by the South Korean company. This move, which confirms Samsung’s continuos attention to innovation, proves the drive of the enterprise on delivering the highest quality products with consistency while maintaining a strong focus on research and development.

  • Samsung Z2 Officially Launched in Indonesia

    The Samsung Z2 launch which was initially planned for the month of September in Indonesia, however that didn’t turn out to be true. Samsung Indonesia have finally launched the Z2 in the country at an official launch event. The launch took place at the country’s capital Jakarta on Wednesday that is the 19th of October. The smartphone has been priced at 899,000 Indonesian Rupiah ($70 approx.). Samsung are also bundling a free Batik back cover with the smartphone for the early customers. This is also the first Tizen smartphone to be launched in Indonesia.

  • Game: Candy Funny for your Tizen smartphone

    Here is another puzzle type game that has recently hit the Tizen Store for you to enjoy. “Candy Funny” is brought to you by developer Julio Cesar and is very similar to Candy Crush.

    You have 300 levels available to play and all levels have 3 stars , the number of stars shows how good or bad you actually are. You don’t have much time to accumulate the highest score you can and unlock further screens.

  • Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016 Game for Tizen Smartphones

    Games2Win India Pvt. Ltd. (www.games2win.com) an Indian app development company has more than 800 proprietary apps and games in all smartphone and tablet platforms. Now, they have 51 million downloads of their apps and games in all platforms. They have already got 8 games in the Tizen Store and today they added a new cricket game “Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016”.

  • Slender Man Game Series now available on Tizen Store

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