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Red Hat open sources Ansible Galaxy for all

TuxMachines - Wed, 2016-10-12 00:25

Linux giant Red Hat wants to be a cloud power, but it's not giving up on its open-source roots. So, it should come as no surprise that it's open-sourcing its Ansible DevOps program's Galaxy code repository.

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DRM Driver Changes Sent In For Linux 4.9, Sadly No Changes For Nouveau

Phoronix - Wed, 2016-10-12 00:24
David Airlie a short time ago submitted the Linux 4.9 DRM subsystem update, including the much sought after open-source Direct Rendering Manager driver improvements. There's a lot of good stuff in here, but sadly the Nouveau changes look like they're going to have to wait until Linux 4.10...

Solus Devs Finalize Full-Disk Encryption for the OS, Coming Soon in Solus 1.2.1

TuxMachines - Wed, 2016-10-12 00:21

We bet that, by now, all of you know Solus is a rolling release operating system, right? But even rolling OSes get new, updated ISO images (installation mediums) from time to time for those who want to install the distro for the first time, or reinstall, right?

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Android Candy: More Life Gamification

LXer - Wed, 2016-10-12 00:13
You might remember a couple months ago mymention of Habitica, which isa gamification of your daily to-do list. One of my friends on Twittermentioned an app he uses on Android called Wokamon, which ties in withyour FitBit (or any of several other "step-counter" devices).

Intel’s ARM/FPGA Stratix 10 SoC is first 14nm FPGA

TuxMachines - Wed, 2016-10-12 00:08

Intel began sampling the Altera Stratix 10, a 14nm SoC that combines 4x Cortex-A53 cores with a Stratix V level FPGA, while using 70 percent less power.

Altera first announced the Stratix 10 SX back in 2013, but the SoC has been delayed, and has only begun sampling now. Along with the challenge of building the first 14nm FPGA, fabricated with Intel’s 14nm 3D Tri-Gate process, the rollout was also likely set back due to Intel’s recent acquisition of the chipmaker. Intel now says the SoC demonstrates “the most significant FPGA innovations in over a decade.”

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Choqok 1.6 Micro-Blogging Client Lands for KDE Users with Better Twitter Support

LinuxToday - Wed, 2016-10-12 00:00

Prominent new features of Choqok 1.6 include the renaming of the StatusNet microblog as GNU Social

Security News

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:36
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Crash: how computers are setting us up for disaster

    When a sleepy Marc Dubois walked into the cockpit of his own aeroplane, he was confronted with a scene of confusion. The plane was shaking so violently that it was hard to read the instruments. An alarm was alternating between a chirruping trill and an automated voice: “STALL STALL STALL.” His junior co-pilots were at the controls. In a calm tone, Captain Dubois asked: “What’s happening?”

    Co-pilot David Robert’s answer was less calm. “We completely lost control of the aeroplane, and we don’t understand anything! We tried everything!”

    The crew were, in fact, in control of the aeroplane. One simple course of action could have ended the crisis they were facing, and they had not tried it. But David Robert was right on one count: he didn’t understand what was happening.

    As William Langewiesche, a writer and professional pilot, described in an article for Vanity Fair in October 2014, Air France Flight 447 had begun straightforwardly enough – an on-time take-off from Rio de Janeiro at 7.29pm on 31 May 2009, bound for Paris. With hindsight, the three pilots had their vulnerabilities. Pierre-Cédric Bonin, 32, was young and inexperienced. David Robert, 37, had more experience but he had recently become an Air France manager and no longer flew full-time. Captain Marc Dubois, 58, had experience aplenty but he had been touring Rio with an off-duty flight attendant. It was later reported that he had only had an hour’s sleep.

    Fortunately, given these potential fragilities, the crew were in charge of one of the most advanced planes in the world, an Airbus 330, legendarily smooth and easy to fly. Like any other modern aircraft, the A330 has an autopilot to keep the plane flying on a programmed route, but it also has a much more sophisticated automation system called fly-by-wire. A traditional aeroplane gives the pilot direct control of the flaps on the plane – its rudder, elevators and ailerons. This means the pilot has plenty of latitude to make mistakes. Fly-by-wire is smoother and safer. It inserts itself between the pilot, with all his or her faults, and the plane’s mechanics. A tactful translator between human and machine, it observes the pilot tugging on the controls, figures out how the pilot wanted the plane to move and executes that manoeuvre perfectly. It will turn a clumsy movement into a graceful one.

  • Canonical Patches New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

    Today, October 11, 2016, Canonical published several security advisories to inform Ubuntu users about new Linux kernel updates for their supported operating systems.

    Four new kernel vulnerabilities are affecting Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) or later versions, and three the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) series of operating systems. They are also affecting the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for Raspberry Pi 2 kernel.

    The first security flaw is an unbounded recursion in Linux kernel's VLAN and TEB Generic Receive Offload (GRO) processing implementations, which could have allowed a remote attacker to crash the system through a denial of service or cause a stack corruption. It was discovered by Vladimír Beneš and affects Ubuntu 16.04 and 14.04.

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FreeBSD 11

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:35
  • FreeBSD 11
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE Announcement
  • FreeBSD Takes Open Source to 11 with Latest Release

    October 10, 2016, Boulder, CO. – The FreeBSD Project, in conjunction with the FreeBSD Foundation, is pleased to announce the release of the much anticipated FreeBSD 11.0. The latest release continues to pioneer the field of copyfree-licensed, open source operating systems by including new architecture support, performance improvements, toolchain enhancements and support for contemporary wireless chipsets. The new features and improvements bring about an even more robust operating system that both companies and end users alike benefit greatly from using.

  • Bodhi 4.0 Beta Ships with Number of Improvements

    FreeBSD 11.0 was also released today for those who think Linux is just too dang easy. The announcement said this is the first release in the stable 11.0 branch. Some of the listed highlights include:

    * OpenSSH DSA key generation has been disabled by default.
    * Wireless support for 802.11n has been added
    * ifconfig(8) utility will set the default regulatory domain to FCC on wireless interfaces
    * Up to 40% improvement in performance
    * Support for the AArch64 (arm64) and RISC-V architectures
    * Native graphics support has been added to the bhyve(8) hypervisor
    * Support for Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi 2 and Beaglebone Black peripherals

    Version 11 also features GNOME 3.18.4, LibreOffice 5.0.6, NVIDIA 346.96, Xorg X Server 1.17.4, GCC 4.8.5, GIMP, and Firefox 47.0.1. See the release announcement for download information.

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KDE neon offers cutting edge Plasma

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:32

For people who wish to keep up with the latest developments in KDE software and the Plasma desktop, one way to get a vanilla, cutting edge preview of what is coming out of the KDE project is to run KDE neon. KDE neon is an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution and live DVD featuring the latest KDE Plasma desktop and other KDE community software. Besides the installable DVD image, the project provides a rapidly-evolving software repository with all the latest KDE software. There are two editions of KDE neon, a User edition with stable releases of KDE packages, and the Developer edition which offers cutting edge development packages fresh from the build server.

At the end of September I decided to experiment with the User edition of KDE neon. The download for the User edition is approximately 970MB in size. Booting from the downloaded ISO brings up the Plasma desktop. The wallpaper is a collection of blue, purple and black regions. The application menu, task switcher and system tray sit at the bottom of the screen. The theme is mostly a combination of light grey and dark grey. On the desktop we find a single icon for launching the distribution's system installer.

KDE neon uses the Ubiquity graphical system installer it inherits from Ubuntu. The installer asks us to select our preferred language from a list and then gives us the option of downloading third-party software such as media codecs and Flash. We can also choose to download software updates during the installation process. We are then walked through disk partitioning, selecting our time zone from a map of the world, confirming our keyboard's layout and creating a user account. The installation process is pleasantly straight forward and we can typically take the defaults offered on each page. When the installer finishes setting up our new operating system we can either return to the live desktop or reboot the computer.

Once installed, KDE neon boots to a graphical login screen. Plasma is the only login session available to us and we can sign into the account we created during the installation process. The Plasma desktop looks the same as it did during the live session, but there are no icons on the desktop. We are not greeted by any welcome screen and there are no notifications or other distractions.

Shortly after signing into the Plasma desktop an icon in the system tray subtly indicates there are software updates available to us. Clicking the icon opens a widget which indicates the number of waiting updates and 42 were available the first day I was using KDE neon. At the bottom of the widget is an Update button and clicking the button launches the Discover software manager.

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Ubuntu 16.04, re-tested six months later

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:27

Six months in between releases is just too short of a period for meaningful, well-tested releases. As soon as issues are polished in one edition with a cumulative fix edition, there's a new version of Ubuntu and the headless chicken race starts again. We will soon have 16.10, and it will most likely suck, because there will be a million little problems that could not have been fully checked in time, but schedule be schedule, release we must. Woe any delays!

Ubuntu 16.04.1 Xenial Xerus is a better release than the GA flop, but it is still not good enough to recommend. The networking stack sucks more than what Trusty does, and overall, it is slower, less responsive, less mature, less complete. It is also not as good as Fedora, and there are some big regressions slash sad neglect in the software stack that tells me the whole idea of the Linux desktop is slowly dying. People did not like the Amazon store and the payware options in USC, but it was a first sane step to offering a mature version of Ubuntu to serious people. Alas, zealots shot it down, because they value pride over progress. And now what is left is a semi-functional distro that is a pale shadow of its former self.

So yes, it works better than before. 6/10 or so. Not even remotely close to the glory of the Trusty release, which heaped accolade upon accolade, accomplishment after another. Trusty just did everything. It was and still is awesome. Xerus is just weak. And even the post-fiasco release is still somewhat lame. Not worth upgrading. Xenial is in denial. I shall now patiently wait to see what doom the Yakety Sax is going to bring us. Ought to happen very very soon, and the timing of this article couldn't have been any more perfect. Stay tuned.

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Games for GNU/Linux

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:18

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HandyLinux decides to drop future english translations

LXer - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:16
HandyLinux is a Debian based distribution. It is mainly concentrated on beginners and user who prefer easy way to use Linux. It uses Xfce desktop environment, so it is even compatible with older hardware. But there is a sad news for people who prefer English language, HandyLinux team decided to stop English translations in future updates.[.....]

Fedora 25 Beta Released, Ships with GNOME 3.22 Desktop and Linux Kernel 4.8.1

TuxMachines - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:11

Today, October 11, 2016, Fedora Project released of the Beta milestone of the upcoming Fedora 25 Linux operating system, due for release in mid-November.

Also: Fedora 25 Beta Released

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Kexi 3.0.0 Released as the Perfect Microsoft Access Replacement for Linux

LinuxToday - Tue, 2016-10-11 23:00

softpedia: Kexi 3.0.0 is a major milestone of the open-source database manager suite, which is considered the perfect replacement for proprietary alternative from Windows or Mac OS X platforms

Install and configure DRDB for network filesystem replication on Debian 8

LXer - Tue, 2016-10-11 22:19
This tutorial explains the configuration of a DRBD network filesystem replication as hot standby (Primary/Secondary) with EXT4 filesystem and as Primary/Primary cluster for High Availability with OCFS2 filesystem.


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