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Virtual keyboard software?

Reddit - Mon, 2018-11-12 23:31

I'm looking for a software to have the screen keyboard on my touch screen pc because the default gnome does not open if I use the browser, I write mail etc. Before I used onboard, but with fedora, the latter, does not attach to the bottom of the screen (I do not know why) and I do not want to use it in fluctuating mode. Some alternative software and an onboard solution?

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How to set up PySpark for your Jupyter notebook

LXer - Mon, 2018-11-12 23:29
Apache Spark is one of the hottest frameworks in data science. It realizes the potential of bringing together big data and machine learning. This is because:read more

Kernel: Linux System Wrapper Library, Microsoft Mice, and EXOFS

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 23:27
  • Kernel Developers Debate Having An Official Linux System Wrapper Library

    As new system calls get added to the Linux kernel, these syscalls generally get added to Glibc (and other libc libraries) for developers to make easy use of them from their applications. But as Glibc doesn't provide 1:1 coverage of system calls, sometimes is delayed in their support for new calls, and other factors, there is a discussion about providing an official Linux system wrapper library that could potentially live as part of the kernel source tree.

    This weekend was the initial proposal for having an official Linux system wrapper library. Though that initial proposal is a bit flawed in saying that "glibc is basically not adding new system call wrappers", as they are, just sometimes it takes a while among other factors. But it is accurate in reflecting a problem with the status quo.

  • Linux Getting Two-Line Patch To Finally Deal With The Quirky Microsoft OEM Mouse

    While Microsoft is self-proclaimed to love Linux, their common and very basic Microsoft OEM Mouse has not loved the Linux kernel or vice-versa... The Linux kernel HID code is finally getting a quirk fix to deal with the Microsoft OEM mouse as it would disconnect every minute when running at run-levels one or three.

    The basic Microsoft OEM Mouse that's been available for years (appearing as a PixArt vendor and USB ID 0x00cb) would disconnect every 60~62 seconds on Linux systems when connected out-of-the-box. This isn't some high-end gaming mouse but Microsoft's dead basic OEM optical mouse.

  • Linux Poised To Remove Decade-Old EXOFS File-System

    The Linux kernel will likely be doing away with EXOFS, a file-system that had been around since the Linux 2.6.30 days.

    EXOFS is a file-system originally derived from EXT2 file-system code for basing it on an external object store. This object-based file-system was originally developed by IBM.

    Veteran kernel developer Christoph Hellwig is now seeking to remove the EXOFS object-based file-system on the basis of it being "just a simple example without real life users."

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today's howtos and CLI examples

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 23:23

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OpenStack vs. Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes: What Fits Where?

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 23:08

Open-source cloud application infrastructure can be a confusing landscape to navigate with multiple projects, including OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes. While there are some points of overlap, each technology has its own merits and use-cases.

Among the vendors that uses and contributes to OpenStack, Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes is SUSE, which also has commercial products for all three technologies as well. In a video interview with eWEEK, Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO at SUSE explains how the three open-source technologies intersect at his company.

"We see that our customers don't use a single open-source project, most of the time they to use different ones, with different lifecycles and sometimes they overlap," Di Giacomo said.

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Mesa Drops Support For AMD Zen L3 Thread Pinning, Will Develop New Approach

Phoronix - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:48
It was just a few months back that the Mesa/RadeonSI open-source AMD Linux driver stack received Zen tuning for that CPU microarchitecture's characteristics. But now AMD's Marek Olšák is going back to the drawing board to work on a new approach for Zen tuning...

Linux Journal Reviews the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Laptop, Red Hat Wants to Hear About Desktop/Laptop Setups

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:45
  • Review: the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Laptop

    Canonical recently made an official announcement on its company blog stating that the Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop (that is, Project Sputnik) now ships with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) pre-installed. Upon reading this, I quickly reached out to Dell asking to review the laptop. I'm a Linux developer, and when a developer edition laptop is marketed with Linux pre-installed, I need to experience it for myself. The laptop eventually arrived, and like a child on Christmas morning, I excitedly pulled the device out of the box and powered it up for the first time.

    This is a pretty rock-solid notebook. The device is very light and easy to carry—meaning, it's mobile (which is very important in my book), thin and sleek. Not only does the device look good, but it also performs very well.

    [...]

    Overall, I had a very positive experience with the 7th generation Dell XPS 13. It's a powerful machine and fully capable of handling all sorts of developer workloads. And if used in a professional environment, it's very mobile as well. You can carry it from conference room to conference room and resume your work with little to no disruption. Ubuntu is well integrated with the machine, and it shows. You can't ask for more in a developer's laptop. I definitely consider this device to be well worth the investment.

  • What does your Linux setup look like?

    Jim Hall: I run Fedora Workstation on a Lenovo X1 Carbon laptop, with an ASUS 24" external display. That gives me a dual-display configuration that lets me work in one window on the larger display while having a separate space to run my music player or other apps. I love my Perixx ergonomic keyboard and my Microsoft Classic Intellimouse. When I'm feeling nostalgic, I swap out the ergo keyboard with my replica IBM Model M keyboard by Unicomp; the buckling spring keys are really easy to type with. My printer is an HP color LaserJet, which works seamlessly with Linux.

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Unix, Linux, and IncludeOS

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:42
  • An illustrated tour of Unix history

    Unix pioneer Rob Pike was there from the start, physically transporting key elements of the "Toronto distribution" of Unix to Berkeley when he started grad school, and then to Bell Labs, working alongside Dennis Ritchie and other key Unix programmers to develop and refine everything from modern editors to compilers to windowing systems.

    His hour-long "illustrated memoir" of the deep history of Unix is delightful, touching on the people and institutional forces that shaped the operating environment that has come to dominate modern computing (he even gives a mention to Cardiac, the cardboard computer that shaped my own computing life).

  • All Servers Are Now On Linux!

    The next step for these servers is to massage them into actual Linux Daemons, which shouldn't be HUGE, but it will take a minor rewrite of some bits of code. Not a huge issue until I have a real server though. So, really the next step is to get the base functionality built out in the next 3 Servers(Mob, Narrative, & Social)

  • IoT security and Linux: Why IncludeOS thinks it has the edge [Ed: Promoting IncludeOS by bashing Linux even though security of IncludeOS is yet unproven; Linux devices' Achilles heel: weak/consistent passwords, open ports]

    Per Buer, CEO and co-founder of Norwegian software company IncludeOS, thinks the growing use of Linux as an embedded operating system is giving it a role for which it is far from perfect.

    "Linux has impressive hardware and software support. It supports just about any protocol and any peripheral. It is all dynamic so anything at any time can connect to a Linux system," he wrote recently.

    "The result is a massive amount of code and following this a considerable number of potential bugs that could lead to compromise."

    He thinks his company's OS offers a better solution. It has created an open-source OS that links into the application at compile time, resulting in one software image where the OS functionality is inside the application and running directly on top of the hardware.

    IncludeOS links only the OS functionality that the application needs into the binary software image, thus reducing both its size and possible attack surfaces. This approach is normally termed a 'library OS'.

    IncludeOS runs in a single address space, so there are neither interprocess communications nor concepts like user space and kernel space.

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OpenStack vs. Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes: What Fits Where?

LXer - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:15
VIDEO: Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO at SUSE, explains how the three major open-source cloud technologies intersect at his company.

Debian in Events: Reproducible Builds and X2Go

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:02
  • Chris Lamb: Review: The "Trojan Room" coffee

    I was recently invited to give a seminar at the Cambridge University's Department of Computer Science and Technology on the topic of Reproducible Builds.

  • Results produced while at "X2Go - The Gathering 2018" in Stuttgart

    Over the last weekend, I have attended the FLOSS meeting "X2Go - The Gathering 2018" [1]. The event took place at the shackspace make spacer in Ulmerstraße near S-Bahn station S-Untertürckheim. Thanks to the people from shackspace for hosting us there, I highly enjoyed your location's environment. Thanks to everyone who joined us at the meeting. Thanks to all event sponsors (food + accomodation for me). Thanks to Stefan Baur for being our glorious and meticulous organizer!!!

    Thanks to my family for letting me go for that weekend.

    Especially, a big thanks to everyone, that I was allowed to bring our family dog "Capichera" with me to the event. While Capichera adapted quite ok to this special environment on sunny Friday and sunny Saturday, he was not really feeling well on rainy Sunday (aching joints, unwilling to move, walk interact).

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Fedora and NeuroFedora

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:00

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OpenStack vs. Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes: What Fits Where

LinuxToday - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:00

eWEEK VIDEO: Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO at SUSE, explains how the three major open-source cloud technologies intersect at his company.

GPL Licensing: FSF Update Rules Commons Clause Non-Free, Red Hat on Compliance

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:51
  • FSF Update Rules Commons Clause Non-Free

    The Free Software Foundation has added the Commons Clause to its list of non-free licenses among a number of recent updates to its licensing materials. Other changes clarify the GNU GPL position on translating code into another language and how to handle projects that combine code under multiple licenses.

  • More companies want fairness to open source license enforcement

    The 16 new companies in this announcement are a diverse set of technology firms whose participation makes evident the worldwide reach of the GPL Cooperation Commitment. They comprise globally-operating companies based on four continents and mark a significant expansion of the initiative into the Asia-Pacific region. They represent various industries and areas of commercial focus, including IT services, software development tools and platforms, social networking, fintech, semiconductors, e-commerce, multimedia software and more.

    The GPL Cooperation Commitment is a means for companies, individual developers and open source projects to provide opportunities for licensees to correct errors in compliance with software licensed under the GPLv2 family of licenses before taking action to terminate the licenses. Version 2 of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2), version 2 of the GNU Library General Public License (LGPLv2), and version 2.1 of the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPLv2.1) do not contain express “cure” periods to fix noncompliance prior to license termination. Version 3 of the GNU GPL (GPLv3) addressed this by adding an opportunity to correct mistakes in compliance. Those who adopt the GPL Cooperation Commitment extend the cure provisions of GPLv3 to their existing and future GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x-licensed code.

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ARMv8.5 Support Lands In GCC Compiler With Latest Spectre Protection

Phoronix - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:36
Landing just in time with the GCC 9 branching being imminent is ARMv8.5-A support in the GNU Compiler Collection's ARM64/AArch64 back-end...

New Part Day: A $6 Linux Computer You Might Be Able To Write Code For

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:22

The latest news from the world of cheap electronics is a single board computer running Linux. It costs six dollars, and you can buy it right now. You might even be able to compile code for it, too.

The C-Sky Linux development board is listed on Taobao as an ‘OrangePi NanoPi Raspberry Pi Linux Development Board” and despite some flagrant misappropriation of trademarks, this is indeed a computer running Linux, available for seven American dollars.

This board is based on a NationalChip GX6605S SoC, a unique chip with an ISA that isn’t ARM, x86, RISC-V, MIPS, or anything else that would be considered normal. The chip itself was designed for set-top boxes, but there are a surprising number of build tools that include buildroot, GCC and support for qemu. The company behind this chip is maintaining a kernel, and support for this chip has been added to the mainline kernel. Yes, unlike many other single board computers out there, you might actually be able to compile something for this chip.

Also: Modular automation controller builds on UP Squared SBC

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Security: Buttercup, Container Labeling, Serendipity and Security Updates

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:06
  • Buttercup – A Free, Secure And Cross-platform Password Manager

    In this modern Internet era, you will surely have multiple accounts on lot of websites. It could be a personal or official mail account, social or professional network account, GitHub account, and ecommerce account etc. So you should have several different passwords for different accounts. I am sure that you are already aware that setting up same password to multiple accounts is crazy and dangerous practice. If an attacker managed to breach one of your accounts, it’s highly likely he/she will try to access other accounts you have with the same password. So, it is highly recommended to set different passwords to different accounts.

  • Container Labeling

    Container policy is defined in the container-selinux package. By default containers run with the SELinux type "container_t" whether this is a container launched by just about any container engine like: podman, cri-o, docker, buildah, moby. And most people who use SELinux with containers from container runtimes like runc, systemd-nspawn use it also.

    By default container_t is allowed to read/execute labels under /usr, read generically labeled content in the hosts /etc directory (etc_t).

    The default label for content in /var/lib/docker and /var/lib/containers is container_var_lib_t, This is not accessible by containers, container_t, whether they are running under podman, cri-o, docker, buildah ... We specifically do not want containers to be able to read this content, because content that uses block devices like devicemapper and btrfs(I believe) is labeled container_var_lib_t, when the containers are not running.

    For overlay content we need to allow containers to read/execute the content, we use the type container_share_t, for this content. So container_t is allowed to read/execute container_share_t files, but not write/modify them.

  • How my personal Bug Bounty Program turned into a Free Security Audit for the Serendipity Blog

    This blog and two other sites in scope use Serendipity (also called S9Y), a blog software written in PHP. Through the bug bounty program I got reports for an Open Redirect, an XSS in the start page, an XSS in the back end, an SQL injection in the back end and another SQL injection in the freetag plugin. All of those were legitimate vulnerabilities in Serendipity and some of them quite severe. I forwarded the reports to the Serendipity developers.

    Fixes are available by now, the first round of fixes were released with Serendipity 2.1.3 and another issue got fixed in 2.1.4. The freetag plugin was updated to version 2.69. If you use Serendipity please make sure you run the latest versions.

  • Security updates for Monday

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Avoiding senior moments with command-line functions

LXer - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:00
The trick is to make the documentation available on the CLI. Also, how to get a "yes" or "no" answer from grep.

How To Install and Configure GitLab on CentOS 7

LinuxToday - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:00

 Linuxize: GitLab is a web-based open source Git repository manager written in Ruby including wiki, issue management, code review, monitoring and continuous integration and deployment.

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