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Unix, Linux, and IncludeOS

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:42
  • An illustrated tour of Unix history

    Unix pioneer Rob Pike was there from the start, physically transporting key elements of the "Toronto distribution" of Unix to Berkeley when he started grad school, and then to Bell Labs, working alongside Dennis Ritchie and other key Unix programmers to develop and refine everything from modern editors to compilers to windowing systems.

    His hour-long "illustrated memoir" of the deep history of Unix is delightful, touching on the people and institutional forces that shaped the operating environment that has come to dominate modern computing (he even gives a mention to Cardiac, the cardboard computer that shaped my own computing life).

  • All Servers Are Now On Linux!

    The next step for these servers is to massage them into actual Linux Daemons, which shouldn't be HUGE, but it will take a minor rewrite of some bits of code. Not a huge issue until I have a real server though. So, really the next step is to get the base functionality built out in the next 3 Servers(Mob, Narrative, & Social)

  • IoT security and Linux: Why IncludeOS thinks it has the edge [Ed: Promoting IncludeOS by bashing Linux even though security of IncludeOS is yet unproven; Linux devices' Achilles heel: weak/consistent passwords, open ports]

    Per Buer, CEO and co-founder of Norwegian software company IncludeOS, thinks the growing use of Linux as an embedded operating system is giving it a role for which it is far from perfect.

    "Linux has impressive hardware and software support. It supports just about any protocol and any peripheral. It is all dynamic so anything at any time can connect to a Linux system," he wrote recently.

    "The result is a massive amount of code and following this a considerable number of potential bugs that could lead to compromise."

    He thinks his company's OS offers a better solution. It has created an open-source OS that links into the application at compile time, resulting in one software image where the OS functionality is inside the application and running directly on top of the hardware.

    IncludeOS links only the OS functionality that the application needs into the binary software image, thus reducing both its size and possible attack surfaces. This approach is normally termed a 'library OS'.

    IncludeOS runs in a single address space, so there are neither interprocess communications nor concepts like user space and kernel space.

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OpenStack vs. Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes: What Fits Where?

LXer - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:15
VIDEO: Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO at SUSE, explains how the three major open-source cloud technologies intersect at his company.

Debian in Events: Reproducible Builds and X2Go

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:02
  • Chris Lamb: Review: The "Trojan Room" coffee

    I was recently invited to give a seminar at the Cambridge University's Department of Computer Science and Technology on the topic of Reproducible Builds.

  • Results produced while at "X2Go - The Gathering 2018" in Stuttgart

    Over the last weekend, I have attended the FLOSS meeting "X2Go - The Gathering 2018" [1]. The event took place at the shackspace make spacer in Ulmerstraße near S-Bahn station S-Untertürckheim. Thanks to the people from shackspace for hosting us there, I highly enjoyed your location's environment. Thanks to everyone who joined us at the meeting. Thanks to all event sponsors (food + accomodation for me). Thanks to Stefan Baur for being our glorious and meticulous organizer!!!

    Thanks to my family for letting me go for that weekend.

    Especially, a big thanks to everyone, that I was allowed to bring our family dog "Capichera" with me to the event. While Capichera adapted quite ok to this special environment on sunny Friday and sunny Saturday, he was not really feeling well on rainy Sunday (aching joints, unwilling to move, walk interact).

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Fedora and NeuroFedora

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:00

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OpenStack vs. Cloud Foundry vs. Kubernetes: What Fits Where

LinuxToday - Mon, 2018-11-12 22:00

eWEEK VIDEO: Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO at SUSE, explains how the three major open-source cloud technologies intersect at his company.

GPL Licensing: FSF Update Rules Commons Clause Non-Free, Red Hat on Compliance

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:51
  • FSF Update Rules Commons Clause Non-Free

    The Free Software Foundation has added the Commons Clause to its list of non-free licenses among a number of recent updates to its licensing materials. Other changes clarify the GNU GPL position on translating code into another language and how to handle projects that combine code under multiple licenses.

  • More companies want fairness to open source license enforcement

    The 16 new companies in this announcement are a diverse set of technology firms whose participation makes evident the worldwide reach of the GPL Cooperation Commitment. They comprise globally-operating companies based on four continents and mark a significant expansion of the initiative into the Asia-Pacific region. They represent various industries and areas of commercial focus, including IT services, software development tools and platforms, social networking, fintech, semiconductors, e-commerce, multimedia software and more.

    The GPL Cooperation Commitment is a means for companies, individual developers and open source projects to provide opportunities for licensees to correct errors in compliance with software licensed under the GPLv2 family of licenses before taking action to terminate the licenses. Version 2 of the GNU General Public License (GPLv2), version 2 of the GNU Library General Public License (LGPLv2), and version 2.1 of the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPLv2.1) do not contain express “cure” periods to fix noncompliance prior to license termination. Version 3 of the GNU GPL (GPLv3) addressed this by adding an opportunity to correct mistakes in compliance. Those who adopt the GPL Cooperation Commitment extend the cure provisions of GPLv3 to their existing and future GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x-licensed code.

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ARMv8.5 Support Lands In GCC Compiler With Latest Spectre Protection

Phoronix - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:36
Landing just in time with the GCC 9 branching being imminent is ARMv8.5-A support in the GNU Compiler Collection's ARM64/AArch64 back-end...

New Part Day: A $6 Linux Computer You Might Be Able To Write Code For

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:22

The latest news from the world of cheap electronics is a single board computer running Linux. It costs six dollars, and you can buy it right now. You might even be able to compile code for it, too.

The C-Sky Linux development board is listed on Taobao as an ‘OrangePi NanoPi Raspberry Pi Linux Development Board” and despite some flagrant misappropriation of trademarks, this is indeed a computer running Linux, available for seven American dollars.

This board is based on a NationalChip GX6605S SoC, a unique chip with an ISA that isn’t ARM, x86, RISC-V, MIPS, or anything else that would be considered normal. The chip itself was designed for set-top boxes, but there are a surprising number of build tools that include buildroot, GCC and support for qemu. The company behind this chip is maintaining a kernel, and support for this chip has been added to the mainline kernel. Yes, unlike many other single board computers out there, you might actually be able to compile something for this chip.

Also: Modular automation controller builds on UP Squared SBC

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Security: Buttercup, Container Labeling, Serendipity and Security Updates

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:06
  • Buttercup – A Free, Secure And Cross-platform Password Manager

    In this modern Internet era, you will surely have multiple accounts on lot of websites. It could be a personal or official mail account, social or professional network account, GitHub account, and ecommerce account etc. So you should have several different passwords for different accounts. I am sure that you are already aware that setting up same password to multiple accounts is crazy and dangerous practice. If an attacker managed to breach one of your accounts, it’s highly likely he/she will try to access other accounts you have with the same password. So, it is highly recommended to set different passwords to different accounts.

  • Container Labeling

    Container policy is defined in the container-selinux package. By default containers run with the SELinux type "container_t" whether this is a container launched by just about any container engine like: podman, cri-o, docker, buildah, moby. And most people who use SELinux with containers from container runtimes like runc, systemd-nspawn use it also.

    By default container_t is allowed to read/execute labels under /usr, read generically labeled content in the hosts /etc directory (etc_t).

    The default label for content in /var/lib/docker and /var/lib/containers is container_var_lib_t, This is not accessible by containers, container_t, whether they are running under podman, cri-o, docker, buildah ... We specifically do not want containers to be able to read this content, because content that uses block devices like devicemapper and btrfs(I believe) is labeled container_var_lib_t, when the containers are not running.

    For overlay content we need to allow containers to read/execute the content, we use the type container_share_t, for this content. So container_t is allowed to read/execute container_share_t files, but not write/modify them.

  • How my personal Bug Bounty Program turned into a Free Security Audit for the Serendipity Blog

    This blog and two other sites in scope use Serendipity (also called S9Y), a blog software written in PHP. Through the bug bounty program I got reports for an Open Redirect, an XSS in the start page, an XSS in the back end, an SQL injection in the back end and another SQL injection in the freetag plugin. All of those were legitimate vulnerabilities in Serendipity and some of them quite severe. I forwarded the reports to the Serendipity developers.

    Fixes are available by now, the first round of fixes were released with Serendipity 2.1.3 and another issue got fixed in 2.1.4. The freetag plugin was updated to version 2.69. If you use Serendipity please make sure you run the latest versions.

  • Security updates for Monday

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Avoiding senior moments with command-line functions

LXer - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:00
The trick is to make the documentation available on the CLI. Also, how to get a "yes" or "no" answer from grep.

How To Install and Configure GitLab on CentOS 7

LinuxToday - Mon, 2018-11-12 21:00

 Linuxize: GitLab is a web-based open source Git repository manager written in Ruby including wiki, issue management, code review, monitoring and continuous integration and deployment.

GNOME and KDE Krita Picks

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 20:47
  • Richard Hughes: More fun with libxmlb

    A few days ago I cut the 0.1.4 release of libxmlb, which is significant because it includes the last three features I needed in gnome-software to achieve the same search results as appstream-glib.

  • Usability Testing in Open Source Software (SeaGL)

    I've been involved in Free/open source software since 1993, but recently I developed an interest in usability testing in open source software. During a usability testing class in my Master's program in Scientific and Technical Communication (MS) I studied the usability of GNOME and Firefox. Later, I did a deeper examination of the usability of open source software, focusing on GNOME, as part of my Master's capstone. (“Usability Themes in Open Source Software,” 2014.)

    Since then, I've joined the GNOME Design Team where I help with usability testing.

  • [Krita] Second Edition of “Dessin et peinture numérique avec Krita” published!

    The first edition was written forfor Krita 2.9.11, almost three years ago. A lot of things have changed since then! So Timothée has completely updated this new edition for Krita version 4.1. There are also a number of notes about the new features in Krita 4.

    And more-over, D-Booker worked again on updating and improving the French translation of Krita! Thanks again to D-Booker edition for their contribution.

  • [Krita] Interview with HoldXtoRevive

    About 4 years ago I downloaded GIMP as I wanted to get back into art after not drawing for about 15 years. I got a simple drawing tablet soon after and things just progressed from there.

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Mozilla: Firefox, Reps, Encryption and Testday Results

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 20:42
  • Firefox Ups the Ante with Latest Test Pilot Experiment: Price Wise and Email Tabs

    Over the last few years, the Test Pilot team has developed innovative features for Firefox desktop and mobile, collaborating directly with Firefox users to improve the browser – from reminders to return to a tab on your desktop to a simple and secure way to keep track of your passwords.

    Today, just in time for the holiday shopping season, the Firefox Test Pilot team is introducing Price Wise and Email Tabs — the latest experimental features designed to give users more choice and transparency when shopping online. These game-changing desktop tools are sure to make shopping a breeze with more options to save, share, track and shop. We’ve also made a few updates to the Test Pilot program itself to make it even easier to become a part of the growing Firefox users testing new features.

  • Let Price Wise track prices for you this holiday shopping season

    The online shopping experience is really geared towards purchases that are made immediately. Countless hours have been spent to get you checked out as soon as possible. If you know what you want, and you’re happy with the price, this is great. On the other hand, sometimes you want to take your time, and wait for a deal. For those times, we have our new Test Pilot experiment, Price Wise.

  • Sharing links via email just got easier thanks to Email Tabs

    If your family is anything like ours, the moment the calendar flips to October, you’re getting texts and emails asking for holiday wish lists. Email remains one of the top ways people save and share online, so you likely do what we do: help make everyone’s life easier by diligently copy and pasting the URLs, titles and descriptions into a list. What if Firefox could make that process easier? Thanks to our new Test Pilot experiment Email Tabs, it can.

  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – October 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Tim Maks van den Broek, our Rep of the Month for October 2018!

    Tim is one of our most active members in the Dutch community. During his 15+ years as a Mozilla Volunteer he has touched many parts of the Project. More recently his focus is on user support and he is active in our Reps Onboarding team.

  • As far as I'm concerned, email signing/encryption is dead

    A while back, I used to communicate a lot with users of my popular open source project. So it made sense to sign emails and let people verify — it’s really me writing. It also gave people a way to encrypt their communication with me.

    The decision in favor of S/MIME rather than PGP wasn’t because of any technical advantage. The support for S/MIME is simply built into many email clients by default, so the chances that the other side would be able to recognize the signature were higher.

  • Firefox 64 Beta 8 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday November 09th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 64 Beta 8.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: Gabriela, gaby2300.

    From Bangladesh team: Maruf Rahman, Tanvir Rahman, Md. Raihan Ali, Sajedul Islam, Rizbanul Hasan, Mehedi Hasan, Md. Rahimul Islam, Shah Yashfique Bhuian.

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Do you think that lowering redundancy by sharing packages justifies the inconvenience of not being able to have native portable offline programs?

Reddit - Mon, 2018-11-12 20:38

I understand that this is the "linux way", and I get it that it's "smart" to do it like this, but me, personally, would gladly sacrifice tens or hundreds of megabytes for self-contained, portable, software without any hassle with dependencies and the reliance on an internet connection. Storage is cheap. Everyone has at least 500 gigs of storage. What everyone doesn't have is the convenience of just drag and dropping his program onto a USB and taking it with himself to a friend, or using it on a fresh install. The whole concept of linux relies on rolling releases, and constant updating of packages which eventually won't be compatible with older software. If the guys didn't invent snap and flatpack and appimage (which is supposedly the best because it runs natively without sandboxing), Linux would be severely behind the convenience of Windows. But still, there is a very limited amount of appimage versions of software, and making one yourself takes up a great deal of effort and time. Ubuntu is now pushing snaps, but I don't trust canonical, and they are inferior to appimage. I wish the dudes at appimage would adretise better and people would get more interested in all this because you are too reliant on the internet and the merciful repository gods giving you packages. Couldn't the whole appimage process be automated? Why does it have to go all the way from github? Why can't it just make an ultimate package from the readily available packages already on the computer? I think this is the future of linux, and it will be great to just store a portable program, and just slap it onto a usb, and KNOW that it will work anywhere and everywhere. This will also help people who fix computers, and other guys who don't have constant access to the internet. What do you think?

submitted by /u/plippp
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Latest Games for GNU/Linux

TuxMachines - Mon, 2018-11-12 20:11
  • Little Misfortune is a sweet looking adventure, should hopefully get Linux support

    From the same developer who made Fran Bow (which supports Linux), Little Misfortune is what they're calling an interactive story. With a focus on exploration and the characters, including sweet and dark elements with choices that have consequences.

    With that in mind, when I spoke to the developer in regards to a Linux build they said "We will try to have it, yes! :)". Not solid, but a very positive response especially since they've supported Linux before.

  • Luna and the Moonling is a sweet puzzle game that's now available on Linux

    Luna and the Moonling from Greyborn Studios is a colourful puzzle game with an aim to put a new spin on block-pushing puzzle gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    For those who aren't aware, some of the people from Greyborn Studios previously worked on some pretty major titles like System Shock 2, Thief, Skylanders, Red Faction and quite a few more.

    "From the moment we released in early access last year we’ve had requests from Linux gamers to support the platform," said Michael Ryan, CTO & Technical Director of Greyborn Studios. "We’re big fans of the platform ourselves and were happy to oblige. We really hope Linux users enjoy the game, and welcome them to the Greyborn community," Ryan said.

  • Odd Realm is a sandbox settlement builder inspired by Dwarf Fortress and Rimworld with Linux support
  • Valve gave out more details about Artifact, including some public APIs and pre-order is up

    Artifact, the multi-lane card game from Valve is closing in on release and so Valve have given out a bunch of new details on what to expect.

    Firstly, it's now up for pre-order on Steam for £15.99/$20 and for that price you will get 10 card packs, 5 event tickets, and two complete starter decks. Considering how much such packs cost for real-life card games, that price is actually quite reasonable I think. Additional packs of cards will be $1.99, each pack has 12 random cards. You will also be able to buy and sell cards on the Steam Market.

  • Zeon 25, a retro-inspired hardcore shoot 'em up is now in Early Access

    The Doom-inspired UI bar along the bottom looked quite amusing, haven't really seen many games do something like that in recent years. Looks like it could be worth a shot, the action looks intense enough to keep me interested for sure.

    While it's in Early Access, they're hoping to add a co-op mode along with new maps, new enemies, new levels and so on. The full release is currently scheduled for Q1 2019 although that may change depending on how much feedback they get during development.

  • Neuroslicers is a narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS that will have Linux support

    Neuroslicers from developer Dream Harvest seems like a very interesting title. A narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS and it will be coming to Linux.

  • Feral Interactive have put out the system requirements for Total War: WARHAMMER II, due on Linux this month

    Ready your swords and your axe as Total War: WARHAMMER II is heading to Linux this month and Feral Interactive have now put up the system requirements.

  • Here's What You Need to Play Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux and macOS

    UK based video games publisher Feral Interactive revealed today the official system requirements of the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game for Linux and Mac systems.

    In mid-June, Feral Interactive teased Linux and Mac gamers with the upcoming release of the Total War: WARHAMMER II port for their beloved platforms, the sequel to the critically acclaimed Total War: WARHAMMER video game released more than two years ago. The company said that the Linux and macOS port is coming in November.

    Well, November is here, and now Feral Interactive has revealed the official system requirements for playing the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game on Linux and macOS-powered computers, saying that the port will be available on these two platforms later this month.

  • Warhammer: Vermintide 2 ‘Back to Ubersreik’ DLC Remasters Three Maps From The First Game

    Warhammer: Vermintide 2, Fatshark’s first person rat-murdering action game, will be getting another DLC next month. The Back to Ubersreik DLC takes players to the setting of the first Vermintide game, and will feature remasters of three maps seen in the original Vermintide.

  • Dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a rather nice Anniversary Update that's worth a look

    After managing to sell a few thousand copies, the dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a great update now available.

    For those who missed the story, the developer Bearded Giant Games initially failed to really get anywhere with the game. They wrote a post on Gamasutra about it, where they said it had been a "a soul crushing experience". A pretty sobering reading, as game development has become so much harder in the past few years with stores being flooded with new games. Anyway, many months later they managed to hit over 6,000 sales and so this update is a thank you for keeping the developer going.

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booting from live usb - nomodeset problem

Reddit - Mon, 2018-11-12 20:07

I have tried to install both Solus 3.9999 and Fedora 29 using nomodeset because of my nvidia card. I can not reach a gui to install either operating system. I get a black screen with a blinking cursor. Any suggestion or something I may be doing wrong?

submitted by /u/VolcanicHowl
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